event Calendar

pacific northwest United States (or, wa)

    • October 31, 2020
    • (EDT)
    • November 01, 2020
    • (EDT)

    FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS FOR AMERICANS TO STUDY IN SCANDINAVIA

    Deadline: November 1, 2020

    New York, NY—The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications for Fellowships & Grants for Americans to Study in Scandinavia during the 2021-22 academic year.

    ASF offers both year-long fellowships of up to $23,000 and short-term (1-3 month) grants of up to $5,000 to graduate students (preferably dissertation-related) and academic professionals interested in pursuing research or creative arts projects in the Nordic region. Awards are made in all fields.

    For further information and to begin an online application, please click here!

    Deadline: November 1, 2020

    For email inquiries, please contact grants@amscan.org.

    The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) promotes firsthand exchange of intellectual and creative influence between the United States and the Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. A publicly supported American nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, ASF has an extensive program of fellowships, grants, intern/trainee sponsorship, publishing, and cultural activities. Headquartered in New York City, ASF has members throughout the United States, and alumni and donors worldwide. For more information, visit amscan.org.

    • October 31, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • September 30, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • Online - The Danish American Archive and Library - Blair, NE

    NEW VIRTUAL EXHIBIT - SPREADING "THE WORD": THE DANA COLLEGE THEATER TROUPE TOUR OF 1942

    The Danish American Archive and Library in Blair, Nebraska, presents its first stand-alone online exhibit: Spreading “The Word”: The Dana College Theater Troupe Tour of 1942. The exhibit tells the story of a group of students at the now-defunct Dana College who went on tour to 12 Midwestern Danish American communities in six states. The students performed a play in the original Danish language by the acclaimed Danish playwright Kaj Munk, who two years later was assassinated by German Nazis. Dana College had strong Danish roots, and the exhibit also highlights how WWII and the German occupation of Denmark impacted the students.

    View The Exhibit

    Photos: Copyright and courtesy of The Danish American Archive and Library - Blair, NE

    The world and the Danish American Archive and Library also face a challenge today. “During the Corona epidemic, we haven’t been able to welcome visitors to the archive as we usually do but with this online exhibit we hope to reach a wide audience – both locally and farther afield,” says Jill Hennick, the Danish American Archive and Library’s Executive Director. The archive has over 1,400 cubic feet of documents about Danish American lives and nearly 14,000 books in its library. “This exhibit will have a wide-ranging appeal to anyone interested in our country’s immigration history, the Scandinavian aspect of the Midwest, or WWII,” says Hennick.

    Through photos, letters and lively excerpts from a student diary, the exhibit provides insight into the troupe’s stops in 12 Danish American communities: Omaha, Nebraska; Kimballton, Des Moines, Cedar Falls, Hampton and Ringsted in Iowa; Chicago, Illinois; Racine, Wisconsin; Askov, Minneapolis and Evan in Minnesota; and Viborg, South Dakota. As shown in the exhibit, in many of these locations, residents as well as visitors can still find traces of Danish history, culture, language and cuisine.

    The Dana College drama troupe tour was led by Professor Paul Nyholm, a first-generation Danish immigrant pastor who later received a medal for his support of Denmark during the German occupation. The purpose of the tour was to create unity among Danish Americans, keep the Danish language alive, spread knowledge of Kaj Munk and his play, and encourage a strong faith in God.

    “Ultimately, the students’ performance was seen by 2,000 people but this theater troupe tour – the first in Dana’s history – was a big undertaking for the students and the director,” says Hennick, who lists several reasons: The student actors were second- and third-generation Danish immigrants who needed to learn the lines in a language that few, if any, of them spoke fluently. The Danish American communities were declining – by the 1940s, there were relatively few people who understood Danish, so gathering a local audience for a performance in that language was quite a feat. Added to that, Kaj Munk was somewhat controversial, and his play about faith and miracles is a serious dramatic play that might not appeal to everyone.

    Online internship

    The online exhibit was created working with a graduate history student from American Public University – a Danish American herself – who conducted her public history practicum remotely from South Carolina. “This is our first completely online intern – it’s one of the ways that we are adapting to the Corona epidemic but hosting an online internship also enables us to work with students from a wider geographical area,” says Jill Hennick. The archive has previously worked with ten interns from four different universities. Hennick says: “Being a research library, we find it ideal to work with interns who bring the items in our collection to life.”

    About the archive

    The Danish American Archive and Library in Blair, Nebraska, is dedicated to preserving and sharing Danish American history. It grew out of the archives of Dana College and the United Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church. Since 2010, when Dana College closed, the archive has been an independent non-profit institution. Its mission is to collect, catalog, preserve and make available to the public its vast holdings of documents, photos and other media that show the history and contributions to American life of Danish Americans. The archive is located at 1738 Washington Street in Blair and is open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday by appointment only. To find out more about the archive and for a detailed list of the collections, go to danishamericanarchive.com or call 402-426-7910.

    View the new online exhibit at dana1942theword.org.

    • October 31, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • October 31, 2024
    • (CDT)
    • 5 sessions

    HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

    Autumn Images from Tivoli

    (Photos by NFDA Officer Katrine Vange)

    Halloween, contraction of All Hallows’ Eve, a holiday observed on October 31, the evening before All Saints’ (or All Hallows’) Day. The celebration marks the day before the Western Christian feast of All Saints and initiates the season of Allhallowtide, which lasts three days and concludes with All Souls’ Day. In much of Europe and most of North America, observance of Halloween is largely nonreligious. - Britannica

    Pumpkins and ghosts have captured the imagination of Danish kids, leaving the barrel-smashing, cat-liberating February fancy dress fest of Fastelavn behind.

    Although Halloween is generally considered a tradition with American origins, it’s actually European, and is thought to have its roots in Celtic customs up to 2,000 years old.

    In Ireland, offers were made to Celtic gods and the dead, and scary-looking lamps were carved out of beets – setting the tradition for today’s pumpkins.

    Conversion to Christianity later saw the Celtic tradition combined with All Saints Day – the result was Hallow’s Evening or Hallowe’en.

    The tradition was largely imported to the United States by Irish immigrants in the 19thcentury.

    Although Halloween is one of the biggest annual celebrations in the US, it has been slow to catch on in many European countries which celebrate All Saints Day – or in the case of the United Kingdom, Guy Fawkes’ Night – at the same time of year.

    That has also been the case in Denmark. Although the country does not have a tradition for celebrating All Saints Day due to the predominance of the Lutheran Church of Denmark, kids have traditionally had the chance to dress up and win sweet-tasting treats in February, during Fastelavn.

    As such,Halloween did not really register in Denmark until around the turn of the century.

    In 1999, toy store chain Fætter BR began selling Halloween costumes, contemporary reports from broadcaster DR show.

    Almost half of all families with children in Denmark now buy sweets or candy at Halloween, according to DR.

    That has given a boost to the country’s pumpkin farmers, who have seen sales double over the last ten years.

    "Trick or treat" has now been rendered as the somewhat clunky, and no less aggressive, ‘slik eller trylleri, ellers er dit liv forbi’ (‘candy or magic, or your life is over!) and can be heard on Danish doorsteps on October 31st.

    More people in Denmark now purchase fancy dress costumes for Halloween than they do for Fastelavn, according to sales figures from supermarket company Coop reported by DR.

    Coop's sales of fancy dress costumes for Fastelavn have been on a downward curve at since 2011, and were overtaken by sales for Halloween in 2007.

    Last year saw Coop sell three times as many costumes for Halloween compared to Fastelavn, DR reports.

    General enthusiasm for and pervasion of American culture in Denmark are no small part of the explanation for the trend, according to DR, which notes that Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day have also been successfully transplanted into the Danish calendar.

    Halloween’s timing also benefits stores, which can sell items for the day at a time of the year when a lack of other events makes it ideal for promotion. - From "The Local" DK


    • October 31, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • October 31, 2022
    • (CDT)
    • 3 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - PETER LASSEN

    Peter Lassen (31 Oct 1800 - 26 April 1859) born in Farum (Copenhagen), Denmark in 1800, is the namesake for both Lassen County and Lassen Volcanic National Park. He was a blacksmith by trade and characterized the “old pioneer” spirit and explorations of the Wild West. (Historical records differ on his specific birth date.)

    Lassen began his life in America in Boston, moved to Philadelphia and Missouri as he continued westward, eventually reaching Oregon, Fort Ross and Bodega Bay. He traveled south to Sutter’s Fort in Sacramento, where he was appointed to a posse to look for horses stolen from Sutter’s Ranch.

    When Lassen arrived at the confluence of the Sacramento River and Deer Creek, he was so impressed with the country side, he obtained the required Mexican citizenship so he could purchase 22,000 acres at Deer Creek. In 1845 he established the Bosuejo Ranch and then returned to Missouri to bring people to live there. The emigrants in his group were the first to cross the Lassen Trail.

    He established Benton City, also known as Lassen Ranch. He built Adobe buildings, a blacksmith shop and a store. Benton City became one of the most important sites in Northern California at the time. It was a residence for Colonel Fremont in 1846, for he and 60 of his men.

    Lassen later sold and divided his property holdings between two men and went prospecting for gold. Lassen found gold in 1855 in Honey Lake Valley and held many leadership positions. One of his many roles was president of the Nataqua Territory and surveyor. He was friends with several Native American tribes. He and his party built a cabin for the winter. The cabin burned down in 1896 and was not replaced.

    Lassen continued to search for additional locations for prospecting. He discovered a silver mine near Black Rock Dessert in Nevada. He organized a scouting party of two groups to meet at Black Rock Canyon. The day after he and his two traveling companions, Edward Clapper and Lemericus Wyatt, arrived at the site in April of 1859, Lassen and Clapper were shot and killed. Speculation remains if the shot was indeed fired by a Native American or a member of his own scouting party. Native Americans are attributed for their deaths on the Lassen Monument. Wyatt escaped being shot and rode 124 miles to Susanville to share the tragic news.

    A scouting party was able to recover Lassen’s body, but not Clapper’s. Area residents erected a monument to Lassen to recognize him for the many good deeds of his lifetime. He is buried under the Ponderosa pine tree he camped his first night in the Honey Lake Valley. The original monument burned in 1917 and was replaced with the current one.

    According to historic documents, Clapper’s body was recovered in May 1990 by rock hunters in the Black Rock Desert. They found a skull and upper body skeleton that was determined to be the remains of Edward Clapper. In May of 1992, his remains were placed at the Lassen Monument located on Wingfield Road, just south of Susanville.

    Lassen County

    High in the northeastern Sierra is Lassen County, where volcanic activity has shaped the landscape. Peter Lassen, a Danish immigrant, came to Oregon in 1839 and later settled in the northern Sacramento Valley. He returned to Missouri and led a 12-wagon emigrant train along “Lassen Emigrant Trail” in 1848 into California. - Wikipedia


    • November 05, 2020
    • (PST)
    • September 02, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • 11 sessions
    • First Lutheran Church - Astoria, OR

    LOWER COLUMBIA DANISH SOCIETY MONTHLY MEETINGWe have moved to virtual meetings during the COVID-19 pandemic…
    To maintain the Oregon-state mandated limit on public gatherings and the 6 ft (2 M) of physical distance we need to protect our neighbors, friends, and families from COVID-19 infection, we unfortunately need to move to virtual meetings for the time being.

    A number of our normally-scheduled activities will not take place, but we will be converting as many of them into pandemic-safe events as we can.

    The Lower Columbia Danish Society is an independent organization whose mission is to promote

    • Danish heritage and culture

    • Participation in the annual Astoria Scandinavian Midsummer Festival

    • Activities that foster a sense of hygge and community

    MEMBERSHIP - Our organization welcomes ALL who are interested in Danish heritage and culture - you do not need to be of Nordic descent to participate. At this time there is no membership fee to join us. See our CONTACT US page for membership information.

    Upcoming Events

    REGULAR MONTHLY MEETINGS - We are based in the picturesque river-city of Astoria, Oregon, USA but we draw members from many surrounding communities in Washington and Oregon. We normally meet the first Thursday of every month at the First Lutheran Church, 725 33rd Street, Astoria, OR 97013 USA from 7 pm until about 9 pm. Our meetings begin with a short business meeting, feature an interesting Danish-themed program, and include tasty snacks for all. See our UPCOMING EVENTS page for future meetings.

    Email: lowercolumbiadanes@gmail.com 

    Website

    • November 06, 2020
    • (CST)
    • December 06, 2020
    • (CST)
    • Nordic Northwest - Portland, OR

    SCANFAIR 2020

    First Online Market - Nov 6 - 15

    Second Online Market - Nov 29 - Dec 6

    ScanFair 2020 is right around the corner! Experience the sights, sounds, tastes, and traditions of the Nordic Holiday season. While ScanFair 2020 may look and feel different from the previous years, but nevertheless we've come up with some exciting ways for you and your friends and family to participate!  We are excited to announce that ScanFair 2020 will be comprised of three different elements, including a ScanFair exhibit, a ScanFair guide to the Nordic Holidays (including recipes, how to's, articles, and more!), and finally our ScanFair online market which will be running from November 6th to 15th and November 29th to December 6th!

    Scanfair 2020

    • November 07, 2020
    • (CST)
    • National Nordic Museum - Seattle, WA

    VIRTUAL ART CLASS FOR KIDS: MOSAIC INSPIRED BY LA VAUGHN BELLE

    Virtual Art Class

    Learn how to make a mosaic craft inspired by La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns.

    La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns and related events are supported in part by the ScanDesign Foundation.

    EXHIBIT - LA VAUGHN BELLE: A HISTORY OF UNRULY RETURNS

    Exhibit Runs October 8 - January 3

    In the mid-17th century, Denmark established a colonial presence in the Caribbean and participated in the transatlantic slave trade until the early 19th century. Though Denmark was the first European country to abolish the transport of enslaved Africans in 1792, approximately 120,000 people from present-day Ghana were brought to the Danish West Indies (now the United States Virgin Islands) to plant and harvest sugar cane. The emancipation of slaves on the Danish West Indies occurred in 1848, and the Virgin Islands’ former plantation economy collapsed. In 1917, Saint Croix, Saint John, and Saint Thomas were sold to the United States and introduced into yet another national narrative. In October 2020, the National Nordic Museum will present the exhibition La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns. This exhibition brings to light whole truths of this historical episode through the fragments of material culture it left behind.

    La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns features the paintings of contemporary artist La Vaughn Belle. Based on the island of Saint Croix, Belle investigates the legacy of colonialism. The exhibition will feature approximately six large-scale paintings from her series “Chaney (We Live in the Fragments)” (2015-present). “Chaney” refers to ceramic shards found in abundance in the soil of Saint Croix. Belle explains, “There are small fragments of pottery, often blue and white, that surface the soil in the Virgin Islands after a hard rain and glimmer. Coming first as plates, tea pots and cups from Holland, England, Denmark and North America as part of the vast transatlantic trade of the last centuries of the second millennia, they became its detritus, broken down into the soil, just like the traded bodies. The fragments return to the open air as offerings. Children would pick up these shards, claim them and grind them round to mimic coins.” The unearthing of this patterned pottery evokes the past and its legacy. Belle paints enlargements of different Chaney patterns and, when pieced together as a series, the images become a visual metaphor for the diverse origins and identities of Caribbean people today. Belle notes that “as daughters and sons of the dispersion, we are but many fragments – Danish, British, Yoruba, Akwamu, Kalinago, Taino – we are pieces of patterns and peoples that we may no longer recognize or acknowledge.”  

    This exhibition will be the first solo exhibition of Belle's work in the Pacific Northwest. La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns will be complemented by public programming, including an artist's talk and a screening of the documentary We Carry It Within Us (2017).

    Welcome Back!

    Please reserve your tickets in advance online.

    All visitors must reserve tickets before arriving to the Museum, including Members, complimentary pass holders, and general admission. Please only reserve tickets for the date and time you intend to visit, in order to keep more tickets available for more people. Remember, Members are always free but must reserve their entry time in advance online. Members must log in prior to purchasing tickets to receive their free tickets. Log in using the red button at top right of every page or use this Log In link.

    Nordic Museum Welcome Back Page

    • November 10, 2020
    • (CST)
    • November 10, 2024
    • (CST)
    • 5 sessions

    MORTENSAFTEN

    Sankt Morten is the Danish name of Saint Martin of Tours. According to legend, Martin was forced to become a bishop by his parishioners and tried to hide in a barn. However, the noise of the geese gave him away. For this reason, but probably in reality because of the goose slaughtering season, it is tradition to eat a goose dinner, although over time duck has become a more practical dish on this occasion.

    In Denmark, Mortensaften, meaning the evening of St. Martin, is celebrated with traditional dinners, while the day itself is rarely recognized. (Morten is the Danish vernacular form of Martin.) The background is the same legend as mentioned above, but nowadays the goose is most often replaced with a duck due to size, taste and/or cost.








    Mortensaften Youtube Video

    • November 11, 2020
    • (CST)
    • November 18, 2020
    • (CST)
    • The Danish Pioneer - Chicago, IL

    DANISH PIONEER HOLIDAY ISSUE DEADLINE

    The Danish Pioneer’s Big Holiday Issue 2020 is Around the Corner

    Deadline: November 18

    The Danish Pioneer’s Staff will be working on the newspaper’s big holiday issue through the Thanksgiving Weekend. If you would like to repeat your holiday greeting from last year or place a NEW holiday greeting ad or advertise for the first time, your support is very much appreciated. Please send an e-mail to Editor Linda Steffensen at dpioneer@aol. com or call 847-882-2552 for the 2020 Christmas Issue Advertising Prices. The economical ad prices are the same as last year. The Danish Pioneer celebrates its 148th anniversary in 2020. Thank you to all!

    • November 15, 2020
    • (CST)
    • September 15, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • 9 sessions
    • Online - New Issue Available

    CHURCH AND LIFE - NEW ISSUE

    For more information and to Subscribe...

    Subscribe Here

    CHURCH AND LIFE: A BRIEF HISTORY

    by Thorvald Hansen

    Church and Life (originally, Kirke og Folk) was begun by the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church in 1952 as an exclusively Danish publication in line with its original purpose which was to serve the Danish readership of the church. Until the 1930s the official church paper had been Kirkelig Samler, but when this had been replaced by the English language publication, Lutheran Tidings, the Danish readers were served by a page called Kirkelig Samler in the Danish language Dannevirke, a privately owned weekly which was unofficially related to the church. When this publication ceased in1951, Danish news of the church was no longer available and this was missed, particularly by older readers. It was to fill this vacuum that the new Danish publication was begun.

    The first issues were distributed gratis to some 750 individuals who might be interested, but within a short time it became a subscription paper with some 1,000 subscribers. It was a 16 page paper issued twice monthly. When the Lutheran Church in America was born in 1963 and Lutheran Tidings ceased publication, some of the readers of that paper became subscribers to Church and Life. Today it has become an exclusively English language publication of 12 to l6 pages (depending on the material available) and is issued monthly. The subscription price is $20 per year. Gifts and memorials make up the shortfall, and the paper continues to function in the black. For its content the paper depends upon the voluntary contributions of a significant number of writers. The December issue is at least twice the normal size for Christmas .

    In 1983 the name was changed to Church and Life. This is not, nor was it intended to be, a translation of the Danish, but rather an indication that the church body out of which it grew was concerned also with this earthly life.

    Throughout its long history the paper has had six full time editors: Holger Strandskov, Paul Wikman, Michael Mikkelsen, Johannes Knudsen, and Thorvald Hansen. The present editor, Joy Ibsen, is the daughter of a former pastor in the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church.
    Currently the paper serves some 460 subscribers as a tie that binds them, not only to one another, but to the religious and social environment with which they have been familiar. This is not an exclusive group, nor are they guided by nostalgia, but one to which any and all who share similar values are more than welcome.


    Reference: Evangelical Lutheran Church in America


    • November 19, 2020
    • (CST)
    • November 22, 2020
    • (CST)
    • National Nordic Museum - Seattle, WA

    JULEFEST

    It's time for our 

    43rd annual Julefest!

    Julefest looks a little different this year, but you can still find fun, festive holiday cheer at the Museum.

    Though we can't gather in the thousands for Nordic music, holiday treats, and dozens of vendors, we're still celebrating at the Museum. We kick off Museum with a Julefest-themed Virtual Crafts & Cocktails on Thursday, November 19. Then November 20—22, you'll find an expanded selection of goodies in the Museum Store, plus amazing holiday decorations throughout the Museum. We can't have Santa this year, but you can still take a seasonal selfie with the perfect holiday backdrop! These three days will also feature a special, reduced admission price. 

    Julefest 
    Thursday, November 19—Sunday, November 22
    10am–5pm

    Admission Prices: 

    • Free for Members and children 13 and under

    • $10 general admission (includes admission to the Museum's permanent exhibitions and visiting exhibitions)

    • You must reserve your tickets in advance with our new timed ticket admission form online or by phone

    • We expect tickets to sell out for the weekend, so reserve yours now

    Welcome Back!

    Please reserve your tickets in advance online.

    All visitors must reserve tickets before arriving to the Museum, including Members, complimentary pass holders, and general admission. Please only reserve tickets for the date and time you intend to visit, in order to keep more tickets available for more people. Remember, Members are always free but must reserve their entry time in advance online. Members must log in prior to purchasing tickets to receive their free tickets. Log in using the red button at top right of every page or use this Log In link.

    Nordic Museum Welcome Back Page

    • November 20, 2020
    • (PST)
    • December 02, 2020
    • (PST)
    • Online - Northwest Danish Association - Seattle, WA

    DANISH AMERICA JULE-AUKTION

    Do your holiday shopping early this year while you support the Northwest Danish Association at the virtual Danish American Jule-Auktion! 

    The online Christmas auction will feature various items from Denmark, home-made gifts, stays in vacation homes and hotels, as well as gift certificates for local Pacific Northwest businesses.

    Pick up will be an option for all purchases, shipping will be available for select items. 

    The cause: Your holiday shopping at the 2020 Jule-Aukion will fund Northwest Danish Association’s programs that support elders in their homes, provide scholarships for students, and enrich our wider community. 

    We hope you will join us and bid! 

    NWDA Website NWDA Facebook
    • November 25, 2020
    • (CST)
    • February 28, 2021
    • (CST)
    • 4 sessions
    • Online Concerts

    JESSICA LYNNE WITTY

    Jessica Lynn Witty Facebook

    Tour and Tickets

    My story is not ordinary. I feel pretty ordinary, on the inside. But when I tell people where I come from and how I got here, it usually stirs up a gasp or two. My official story simply states that I grew up in Denmark and now live in the Pacific Northwest, but there is much more to it than that. So I decided to tell it. 

    My childhood was spent divided on three different continents. Strangest of all, I was born in South America. Valdivia, Chile to be exact. My parents were missionaries, but soon after my arrival, they decided to move back to the US. I was 6 months old. Needless to say, I don't remember anything from Chile at all. I ended up with dual citizenship - but not a Chilean one, as you might think, but a Danish/American citizenship. 

    My parents met in New York. My mom, from a small town of Sejlflod in Jylland, Denmark. My Dad from the Pacific Northwest. So when they decided, with 6 months old me in their arms to move back to the US, they settled on Tacoma, WA. Kind of fortuitous that my journey should lead me back here - only about 10 blocks away from my first American home. But that's for a later chapter. 

    My parents divorced when I was three and my mother decided to move us, three girls, to Denmark. First Skanderborg, then what I now consider my hometown, Haslev. This is where I went to school, where I had friends, where I learned about life, and love and longing. This is where I grew up. If you can call yourself a "grown-up" at 17; that's when I moved away from home. 
    I then became what I would call a "Copenhagen nomade" moving almost 25 times in the 13 or so years I lived there, interrupted only by a 2-year stint in Barcelona - also a story for another chapter.

    I finally up-rooted, if I ever had roots, and moved to the Pacific Northwest in 2010 when I was 31.

    And that's the short, cliff notes version story. But that's not really how I want to tell it. I want to tell my story by delving into how that story made me, me. What it was like, being a part of two worlds, and what sometimes felt like not being a part of anything at all. Feeling like an outsider for all the wrong reasons, trying so hard to belong, but not feeling like I belonged at all.
    As a child, I would spend the entire year going to school and living my life in Haslev and every other summer I would visit my Dad in Seattle. The alternating summers, he would visit us. I spoke (and still do speak) both languages fluently... mostly without an accent in either language. My dad would call every week long-distance to keep in touch with us girls. And in the '80s that was not cheap! My mom, even though she is 100% Dane, would make traditional Danish cooking right alongside fried chicken and cornbread. I felt the duality every day. 

    Consequently, it somehow made me feel divided. Instead of belonging everywhere, I felt like I didn't belong anywhere. 
    I suppose, with a different outlook on life, this duality could have made me feel abundant, like a citizen of the world, who had many homes. But my upbringing in so many ways nourished lack and dependence. And it made me feel stretched too thin. I was too American to be Danish and too Danish to be American. So I was, effectively, neither.

    Every time I came back to Denmark I would miss the US terribly. But it was never actually true the other way around. This only occurred to me when I finally moved here, that the homesickness I would feel for the US when gone, never set in for Denmark. Yes, I missed my family, but not the culture, not the place itself. 

    In reality, moving to the US clarified a lot of things for me. I have always been more American than Danish, I know that now. I've been loud, brazen, and always had big dreams and big gestures. Not in any way the proper little girl my mother tried to raise me to be. I had a terrible temper, that felt uncontrollable at times and a big voice that was repeatedly told to not shine too brightly, not to make the other kids feel bad. 

    This may seem harsh, but anyone from Denmark would notice this as "Janteloven" or "The Law of Jante" - a culturally-induced oppression that the Danes all know too well. Again, this is a phenomenon I will explain in depth in another chapter. Suffice it to say, it's a classic "crabs in a bucket" syndrome. When one tries to climb out the others will pull it back down.

    So I suppose I was not entirely caught in the middle. I sometimes describe myself as "half-and-half", with a chuckle. But that doesn't really describe me. In reality, I am more like 75/25. In the last ten years, I have learned to embrace my Danish roots, while also fully encompassing how American I really am. Immigrant heritage and all. 

    In truth, it probably doesn't matter what continent we are on. Denmark for me was a time in my life when I tried to hide who I truly was, in order to try and fit in. It was a time of listening to others over my own intuition, my inner voice. It was a time of not being and owning who I truly am and what my life's purpose is. The US for me has been the journey of fully growing into my true self. A journey of growth and self-exploration. Of owning all sides of me, even the ones I don't necessarily like. And most importantly listening to my own truth rather than what others say. It's not about Denmark and it's not about the US. It's about what each country represents to me and who I became during each timeframe I spent there. 

    I can now look at being "half-and-half" and feel grateful that I was blessed with so much diversity. And I can own my big voice and my larger than life attitude and put myself on a stage and feel right at home. But I can also remember where I came from, and what is truly important in life. Love of family, love of friends and most importantly, self-love.
    • November 26, 2020
    • (CST)
    • November 26, 2021
    • (CST)
    • 2 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - TOM PAULSEN

    Tom Bech Paulsen (November 26, 1922 - May 24 2017) was born, Thorkild Bech Poulsen, in Lemvig, Denmark, on the family estate. Tom lived through the Depression and came of age just before WW II started. As per long standing family tradition he joined the Danish Royal Guards when he was of age. He was the 10th generation of Poulsen's to do so.

    During his stint as a Royal Guard, World War II broke out. Germany quickly invaded and occupied Denmark. The Royal Guards as a whole were interned into a prisoner of war camp. The King, Christian X of Denmark, was eventually able to negotiate the Guards release upon a promise that the Guards would cease and desist their fight against Germany occupation. Upon his release, Tom returned to Lemvig and promptly joined the Danish Resistance. He became a cell leader and did his upmost to fight the occupation. 

    These escapades were as mundane as drawing up plans of the local German beach defensive, to the Resistance calling in a bomber airstrike on a local Gestapo headquarters. However, the two actions he was most proud of during his time as a Danish Resistance fighter was being a part of a group of people that risked their lives to help Danish Jews flee to Sweden. And second, finding a wounded American pilot in hiding and help him escape to Sweden.

    After the end of World War II, the American pilot he helped rescue sent him a letter telling Tom he arrived safely back in the USA and how thankful he was for his help. Thus began a correspondence that eventually led to the pilot sponsoring Tom's bid to become an American residence. It was not an easy path, he had a 5 year waiting period before entry was allowed. While waiting, he lived and worked in Canada for a Swedish construction company that was building barracks for American Airforce bases in Alaska. 

    Eventually Tom made it to Seattle, Washington where he decided to settle. He worked hard to become an American citizen. Back then, to become a citizen, you needed to stand before an immigration judge. When asked why he wanted to be an American citizen. Tom responded, "Your Honor, I have always been an American citizen, I was just born in the wrong country".

    Tom worked hard to build Tom Paulsen Construction into a premier custom home construction company. He has won many awards through his career including Architect Institute of America Home of the Year award. However, he always credited his success to his employees. His philosophy was to build his homes like fine Danish furniture. To that extent he hired and mentored the best Danish, German, and American Carpenters he could find and treat them as family. 

    Tom loved to dance and play soccer on the Danish soccer team (until his 60's). He met the love of his life Nadine Blomquist, at a Swedish club dance. Tom and Nadine enjoyed traveling throughout the world for 58 years. Tom's other hobbies were scuba diving, hunting, and learning to fly. Most importantly, Tom was a loving husband, father, grandfather, and friend. All who knew Tom can attest to his love of life, determination, and caring soul.  He died May 24, 2017. - Seattle Times
    • December 05, 2020
    • (CST)
    • National Nordic Museum - Seattle, WA

    PANEL DISCUSSION ON NORDIC COLONIALISM IN THE CARIBBEAN

    La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns and related events are supported in part by the ScanDesign Foundation.

    EXHIBIT - LA VAUGHN BELLE: A HISTORY OF UNRULY RETURNS

    Exhibit Runs October 8 - January 3

    In the mid-17th century, Denmark established a colonial presence in the Caribbean and participated in the transatlantic slave trade until the early 19th century. Though Denmark was the first European country to abolish the transport of enslaved Africans in 1792, approximately 120,000 people from present-day Ghana were brought to the Danish West Indies (now the United States Virgin Islands) to plant and harvest sugar cane. The emancipation of slaves on the Danish West Indies occurred in 1848, and the Virgin Islands’ former plantation economy collapsed. In 1917, Saint Croix, Saint John, and Saint Thomas were sold to the United States and introduced into yet another national narrative. In October 2020, the National Nordic Museum will present the exhibition La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns. This exhibition brings to light whole truths of this historical episode through the fragments of material culture it left behind.

    La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns features the paintings of contemporary artist La Vaughn Belle. Based on the island of Saint Croix, Belle investigates the legacy of colonialism. The exhibition will feature approximately six large-scale paintings from her series “Chaney (We Live in the Fragments)” (2015-present). “Chaney” refers to ceramic shards found in abundance in the soil of Saint Croix. Belle explains, “There are small fragments of pottery, often blue and white, that surface the soil in the Virgin Islands after a hard rain and glimmer. Coming first as plates, tea pots and cups from Holland, England, Denmark and North America as part of the vast transatlantic trade of the last centuries of the second millennia, they became its detritus, broken down into the soil, just like the traded bodies. The fragments return to the open air as offerings. Children would pick up these shards, claim them and grind them round to mimic coins.” The unearthing of this patterned pottery evokes the past and its legacy. Belle paints enlargements of different Chaney patterns and, when pieced together as a series, the images become a visual metaphor for the diverse origins and identities of Caribbean people today. Belle notes that “as daughters and sons of the dispersion, we are but many fragments – Danish, British, Yoruba, Akwamu, Kalinago, Taino – we are pieces of patterns and peoples that we may no longer recognize or acknowledge.”  

    This exhibition will be the first solo exhibition of Belle's work in the Pacific Northwest. La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns will be complemented by public programming, including an artist's talk and a screening of the documentary We Carry It Within Us (2017).

    Welcome Back!

    Please reserve your tickets in advance online.

    All visitors must reserve tickets before arriving to the Museum, including Members, complimentary pass holders, and general admission. Please only reserve tickets for the date and time you intend to visit, in order to keep more tickets available for more people. Remember, Members are always free but must reserve their entry time in advance online. Members must log in prior to purchasing tickets to receive their free tickets. Log in using the red button at top right of every page or use this Log In link.

    Nordic Museum Welcome Back Page

    • December 08, 2020
    • (CST)
    • National Nordic Museum - Seattle, WA

    GALLERY TALK WITH DIRECTOR OF COLLECTIONS, EXHIBITIONS AND PROGRAMS LESLIE ANN ANDERSON

    La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns and related events are supported in part by the ScanDesign Foundation.

    EXHIBIT - LA VAUGHN BELLE: A HISTORY OF UNRULY RETURNS

    Exhibit Runs October 8 - January 3

    In the mid-17th century, Denmark established a colonial presence in the Caribbean and participated in the transatlantic slave trade until the early 19th century. Though Denmark was the first European country to abolish the transport of enslaved Africans in 1792, approximately 120,000 people from present-day Ghana were brought to the Danish West Indies (now the United States Virgin Islands) to plant and harvest sugar cane. The emancipation of slaves on the Danish West Indies occurred in 1848, and the Virgin Islands’ former plantation economy collapsed. In 1917, Saint Croix, Saint John, and Saint Thomas were sold to the United States and introduced into yet another national narrative. In October 2020, the National Nordic Museum will present the exhibition La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns. This exhibition brings to light whole truths of this historical episode through the fragments of material culture it left behind.

    La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns features the paintings of contemporary artist La Vaughn Belle. Based on the island of Saint Croix, Belle investigates the legacy of colonialism. The exhibition will feature approximately six large-scale paintings from her series “Chaney (We Live in the Fragments)” (2015-present). “Chaney” refers to ceramic shards found in abundance in the soil of Saint Croix. Belle explains, “There are small fragments of pottery, often blue and white, that surface the soil in the Virgin Islands after a hard rain and glimmer. Coming first as plates, tea pots and cups from Holland, England, Denmark and North America as part of the vast transatlantic trade of the last centuries of the second millennia, they became its detritus, broken down into the soil, just like the traded bodies. The fragments return to the open air as offerings. Children would pick up these shards, claim them and grind them round to mimic coins.” The unearthing of this patterned pottery evokes the past and its legacy. Belle paints enlargements of different Chaney patterns and, when pieced together as a series, the images become a visual metaphor for the diverse origins and identities of Caribbean people today. Belle notes that “as daughters and sons of the dispersion, we are but many fragments – Danish, British, Yoruba, Akwamu, Kalinago, Taino – we are pieces of patterns and peoples that we may no longer recognize or acknowledge.”  

    This exhibition will be the first solo exhibition of Belle's work in the Pacific Northwest. La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns will be complemented by public programming, including an artist's talk and a screening of the documentary We Carry It Within Us (2017).

    Welcome Back!

    Please reserve your tickets in advance online.

    All visitors must reserve tickets before arriving to the Museum, including Members, complimentary pass holders, and general admission. Please only reserve tickets for the date and time you intend to visit, in order to keep more tickets available for more people. Remember, Members are always free but must reserve their entry time in advance online. Members must log in prior to purchasing tickets to receive their free tickets. Log in using the red button at top right of every page or use this Log In link.

    Nordic Museum Welcome Back Page

    • December 24, 2020
    • (CST)
    • December 25, 2020
    • (CST)
    • Denmark and United States

    GLÆDELIG JUL!

    Christmas in Denmark embodies the spirit of joy and enthusiasm to the maximum. As December approaches, every house and street is lit up with colourful lights, so much so that it neutralizes the effect of a dull winter. Most Danes believe that Christmas is about carols and songs, the aroma of spruce, oranges and freshly baked cookies. One of the city's oldest traditions is being adorned with thousands of candles to create an atmosphere of warmth, togetherness, relaxation and love. Usually, every store and street is elaborately decorated with green, red or white paper hearts, since this is the Danish symbol during Christmas. Again, even houses and dinner tables are ornamented with lights and hearts. Christmas cookies and æbleskiver are made for both the children and adults. Read on to learn more about the customs and traditions of Christmas in Denmark. 

    Some people in Denmark give and receive extra Advent presents on the four Sundays of Advent.

    Different types of Advent candles and calendars are popular in Denmark. A Kalenderlys (calendar-candle) is an Advent candle and most people have one of these types of candles. A Pakkekalender (gift calendar) is also a fun way to countdown to Christmas Eve. There are 24 small gifts for the children in the calendar, one for each day until Christmas Eve.

    Julekalender (christmas calendar) is a television series with 24 episodes. One episode is shown each day in December with the last one being aired on Christmas Eve. The first Julekalender was shown on TV in Denmark in 1962. The two main Danish TV channels DR and TV2 both show different versions of Julekalender each year. The theme of the stories in the Julekalender normally follow a similar storyline, with someone trying to ruin Christmas and the main characters saving Christmas!

    As well as the TV series, both DR and TV2 produce paper advent calendars to go along with the stories! DR is the oldest TV channel in Denmark and it's paper calendar is called Børnenes U-landskalender (Children's U-Country Calendar) (goes to another site). It's been making the calendars for over 50 years and profits from the sale of the calendar go to help poor children in a developing country. The calendar made by TV2 is called julekalender and profits from that calendar go to help Julemærkefonden, a children's charity in Denmark.

    You can also support Julemærkefonden when you send Christmas Cards in Denmark. Every year a set of Christmas stamps/stickers/seals called julemærket are sold in December to help raise money for the charity. You use a normal postage stamp as well, the julemærket stickers just make the post look more Christmassy! You can out more about julemærket on https://www.julemaerket.dk (goes to another site)

    Christmas Parties are held from 1st November to 24th December where everyone has a good time! Making cakes and biscuits is popular in the time before Christmas. Gingerbread cookies and vanilla ones are often favorites.

    In Denmark most people go to a Church Service on Christmas Eve about 4.00pm to hear the Christmas sermon or talk. It's also an old, traditional custom to give animals a treat on Christmas Eve, so some people go for a walk in the park or woods and they might take some food to give the animals and birds. You might also go for a walk to give you an appetite for the Christmas meal!

    When they get home the main Christmas meal is eaten between 6.00pm and 8.00pm. It's served on a beautifully decorated table. Popular Christmas foods include roast duck, goose or pork. They are served with boiled and sweet potatoes, red cabbage, beetroot and cranberry jam/sauce.

    Most families have a 'ris á la mande' (a special kind of rice pudding, made of milk, rice, vanilla, almonds and whipped cream) for dessert. All but one of the almonds are chopped into pieces. The person who finds the whole almond gets a present called a Mandelgave (almond present). Traditionally the little present was a marzipan pig! Now a marzipan pig is still sometimes given, but it's also often something like sweets or a little toy.

    After the meal the lights on the Christmas Tree are lit, people might dance around the tree and sing carols. Then it's time for people to open their presents. The Christmas tree normally has a gold or silver star on the top and often has silver 'fairy hair' on it to make it glitter.

    On Christmas day people meet with their family and have a big lunch together with danish open-faced sandwiches on rye-bread.

    In Denmark, children believe that their presents are brought by the 'Julemanden' (which means 'Christmas Man' or 'Yule Man'). He looks very similar to Santa Claus and also travels with a sleigh and reindeer. He lives in Greenland, likes rice pudding and is helped by 'nisser' which are like elves.

    St. Lucia's Day (or St. Lucy's Day) is also celebrated on December 13th, although it's more famous for being celebrated in Denmark's neighbor, Sweden.

    In Danish Happy/Merry Christmas is 'Glædelig Jul'. Happy/Merry Christmas in lots more languages.

    • January 01, 2021
    • (CST)
    • January 01, 2025
    • (CST)
    • 5 sessions

    GODT NYTÅR!

    New Year’s Eve rituals exist in many parts of the world and Denmark is no different. Here’s a short guide to understanding some of the best-known traditions.

    The Queen Margrethe’s New Year’s Eve speech at 6pm signals the beginning of a long and festive night. It’s a live broadcast from the Queen’s office in Christian IX’s Palace at Amalienborg, an annual essential that first started with King Christian IX in the 1880s. The Queen takes this opportunity to summarize the year’s main political events, both global and local. The speech always concludes with a salute to the nation with the words “Gud bevare Danmark” (God preserve Denmark), which signals the time to begin the meal.

    Unlike the Christmas dishes consumed just a few days prior, the New Year’s Eve menu consists of boiled cod, served with home-made mustard sauce and all the trimmings. However, Danes are less traditionally bound to the food when it comes to New Year. So, many Danes prepare exotic and alternative specialities for their New Year’s dinner.

    For dessert, the famous Kransekake, a Danish invention from the 1700s. Like champagne, it is one of the fixed elements of New Year’s Eve. It’s a towering cake made from layer-upon-layer of marzipan rings. The cake’s turret-like shape promises happiness and wealth for the coming year.

    Just before midnight, many Danes gather in front of the television to watch a short movie in black and white from 1963 called “90-års fødselsgaden” (“Dinner for one”, also known as “The 90th Birthday”).

    At the midnight countdown, it is a tradition for everyone celebrating indoors to stand on a sofa or a chair and jump into the new year. It symbolizes the hope for better time/eases the transition and then everyone wishes each other a Happy New Year. At this point a choir performs the Danish anthem and the Danish Monarch song.

    Shortly afterwards, people gather in the streets to set off fireworks. Danes traditionally celebrate New Year with lots of fireworks. It was only around 1900 that fireworks began to become something that ordinary people could buy. Before that, New Year was celebrated by using guns to fire shots into the air. It was done because of an old belief that loud noises and fireworks keep spirits and negative energies away.


    • January 03, 2021
    • (CST)
    • National Nordic Museum - Seattle, WA

    EXHIBIT - LA VAUGHN BELLE: A HISTORY OF UNRULY RETURNS

    EXHIBIT ENDS JANUARY 3, 2021

    In the mid-17th century, Denmark established a colonial presence in the Caribbean and participated in the transatlantic slave trade until the early 19th century. Though Denmark was the first European country to abolish the transport of enslaved Africans in 1792, approximately 120,000 people from present-day Ghana were brought to the Danish West Indies (now the United States Virgin Islands) to plant and harvest sugar cane. The emancipation of slaves on the Danish West Indies occurred in 1848, and the Virgin Islands’ former plantation economy collapsed. In 1917, Saint Croix, Saint John, and Saint Thomas were sold to the United States and introduced into yet another national narrative. In October 2020, the National Nordic Museum will present the exhibition La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns. This exhibition brings to light whole truths of this historical episode through the fragments of material culture it left behind.

    La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns features the paintings of contemporary artist La Vaughn Belle. Based on the island of Saint Croix, Belle investigates the legacy of colonialism. The exhibition will feature approximately six large-scale paintings from her series “Chaney (We Live in the Fragments)” (2015-present). “Chaney” refers to ceramic shards found in abundance in the soil of Saint Croix. Belle explains, “There are small fragments of pottery, often blue and white, that surface the soil in the Virgin Islands after a hard rain and glimmer. Coming first as plates, tea pots and cups from Holland, England, Denmark and North America as part of the vast transatlantic trade of the last centuries of the second millennia, they became its detritus, broken down into the soil, just like the traded bodies. The fragments return to the open air as offerings. Children would pick up these shards, claim them and grind them round to mimic coins.” The unearthing of this patterned pottery evokes the past and its legacy. Belle paints enlargements of different Chaney patterns and, when pieced together as a series, the images become a visual metaphor for the diverse origins and identities of Caribbean people today. Belle notes that “as daughters and sons of the dispersion, we are but many fragments – Danish, British, Yoruba, Akwamu, Kalinago, Taino – we are pieces of patterns and peoples that we may no longer recognize or acknowledge.”  

    This exhibition will be the first solo exhibition of Belle's work in the Pacific Northwest. La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns will be complemented by public programming, including an artist's talk and a screening of the documentary We Carry It Within Us (2017).

    La Vaughn Belle: A History of Unruly Returns and related events are supported in part by the ScanDesign Foundation.

    Welcome Back!

    Please reserve your tickets in advance online.

    All visitors must reserve tickets before arriving to the Museum, including Members, complimentary pass holders, and general admission. Please only reserve tickets for the date and time you intend to visit, in order to keep more tickets available for more people. Remember, Members are always free but must reserve their entry time in advance online. Members must log in prior to purchasing tickets to receive their free tickets. Log in using the red button at top right of every page or use this Log In link.

    Nordic Museum Welcome Back Page

    • February 10, 2021
    • (CST)
    • February 10, 2023
    • (CST)
    • 3 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - BENEDICTE MARIE WRENSTED

    Benedicte Marie Wrensted (February 10, 1859 – January 19, 1949) was a notable Danish-American photographer best known for the many photographs she took of the Shoshone native people in Idaho. She is remembered for her documentation of the Northern Shoshone, Lemhi, and Bannock tribes in Idaho between 1895-1912.

    Born in Hjørring, Jutland, Benedicte learned photography (one the the few professions considered suitable for women at the time) from her aunt, Charlotte Borgen. She then opened her own studio in Horsens, which she ran until she emigrated to the United States in 1894. 

    After arriving in America, Benedicte moved to Pocatello, Idaho where her brother Peter had settled. Here she acquired a studio in 1895 where she took photographs of the local inhabitants and recorded the growth of the town. Her documentary photographs of the Shoshone and Bannock Native Americans are still considered to be of great anthropological importance. Many of her Native American images are preserved at the Smithsonian Institution and the National Archives.

    Wrensted's parents were Captain Carl V. Wrensted, later an innkeeper, and Johanne Borgen.  She grew up and attended school in Frederikshavn in the far north of Jutland. One of the few professions considered suitable for women at the time was photography. Wrensted learnt the craft in the 1880s from her aunt, Charlotte Borgen, who was a photographer in Frederikshavn.  She then opened a studio of her own in Horsens.

    She was known for her expressive handling of natural light and the painterly quality of her photographs. Wrensted photographed The Edmos, a prominent Native American family from the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, quite often.

    Wrensted became a U.S. citizen in 1912, at age 53, and the same year she ended her career as a photographer. She sold her studio in Pocatello and moved to Los Angeles where she died on January 19, 1949 shortly before her 90th birthday.

    Many of her Native American images are preserved at the Smithsonian Institution and the National Archives. In the fall of 1984, Smithsonian anthropologist, Joanna Cohan Scherer was looking for photographs in the Smithsonian Institute's "Handbook of North American Indian" and came across the clutter of the Bannock County Historical Society in Pocatello, Idaho. She came across some Bannock County images that had the imprint "B. Wrensted, Pocatello." After rediscovering these photographs and finding a collection of glass plate negatives in the National Archives labeled "Portraits of Indians from Southeastern Idaho Reservations, 1897".she was determined to find out more about Wrensted. She consulted tribal elders from the nearby Fort Hall Indian Reservation, wrote letters to people, checked business directories and looked through tons of museums and libraries in an effort to uncover the background of Wrensted and her photographs. The Idaho Museum of Natural History has a goal of demonstrating ways in which photographs can be placed within a historical context. Only 1% of Wrensted's images at the National Archives and Records Administration were identified at the onset of a digital library collection project. Once they were shown to the descendants at the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, information regarding families of origin were discovered and with the help of written records, 84% of Wrensted subjects have now been identified.

    Scherer encourages the reader to "go beyond consideration of Wrensted's portraits as art," by advocating for the identification of the individual people portrayed in the photos as a means of avoiding stereotyping and the characterization of generic Indians as more "noble savages". "What sets Wrensted's work apart," says Schere, "is her skill in portraying the humanity—the individuality—of the people who posed for her. She captured their presence with a dignity and beauty that transcend time and place." According to Scherer's estimates, today 170 of Wrensted's Shoshone Bannock images are known to exist in various collections, with a substantial number at the Idaho Museum of Natural History. Wrensted's photographs of her Indian subjects were not left with the people of the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, but were, as Scherer tells us, "uprooted from their place of origin and put into impersonal hands—namely, the National Archives in Washington, D.C."

    Idaho State University - Benedicte Wrensted Collection:

    View Collection Online

    • April 01, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • April 01, 2025
    • (CDT)
    • 5 sessions

    BODTKER GRANTS - DEADLINE

    Deadline for Submission: April 15

    The Danish American Heritage Society is pleased to offer grants to qualified researchers for study in area of common interest. Bodtker Grants provide stipends of up to $5,000 for students or graduates interested in exploring  topics related to Danish history and heritage in North America. 


    A Bodtker Grant is primarily intended for research and internship at Danish American Archive and Library in Blair, Nebraska; the Danish American Archive at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa; or the Museum of Danish America in Elk Horn, Iowa. At the Board's discretion, proposals involving other Danish cultural and archival institutions may be considered.

    Deadlines: April 15 (Notification: May) or September 15(Notification: October)
    Stipend Amount: Up to $5,000

    Grant Application

    DAHS Website


    • May 05, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • May 09, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • Renaissance Hotel - Seattle, WA

    DANISH AMERICAN HERITAGE SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

    2021 Danish American Heritage Society Conference
    Traditions and Transitions: Ways of Being Danish
    May 5-9, 2021 (Thursday-Sunday)




    ​Venue
    Renaissance Seattle Hotel
     515 Madison St, Seattle, WA 98104
    +1 206-583-0300​

    Picture

    ​The Danish American Heritage Society is pleased to announce and invites you to attend our next international conference on May 5-9, 2021 at the Renaissance Seattle Hotel in Seattle, Washington. This conference is being held in conjunction with the 111th annual meeting of the Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study.
    The organizing theme of our conference is “Traditions and Transitions: Ways of Being Danish,” which we hope will provide ample scope for exploring the identities and experiences of Danes and Danish Americans past and present. We also invite the submission of proposals for papers and presentations on topics related to this theme, which may include (but are not limited to):

    • The role of religious, educational, and/or artistic institutions, such as Danish folk high schools, in shaping and preserving Danish traditions
    • Literary, artistic, cinematic, and/or musical depictions of individual and social transitions
    • Culinary and handicraft traditions of Danes and Danish Americans
    • Political and economic transitions, such as the 1917 sale of the Virgin Islands or joining the European Union, that inspired new traditions and challenged old ones
    • Linguistic shifts in Danish and English related to people in transit
    • Translation into and out of Danish and its dialects
    • Past and present migrations into, within, and out of Denmark

    ​Individual presenters wishing to submit a proposal for a paper or presentation of 20 minutes should send their name, email address, paper title, abstract (maximum 300 words), and a short biography of the speaker (maximum 150 words) to dahs2021conference@gmail.com by October 1, 2020.

    Although cultures may seem to be fixed, they are always in transition, navigating between tried and true traditions and new opportunities and innovations. Even the potato, which seems today to be a quintessential part of Danish food culture, was a novel import in the 17th century that seemed both foreign and somewhat suspect. Cultural heritage is the product of many generations’ attempts to hold on to practices and beliefs that give meaning to their identities as members of a national, linguistic, or ethnic group, while also dealing with the changes and challenges that they inevitably encounter. People in transit, particularly those who leave their homelands for prolonged periods of time, are also in a state of “in-betweenness,” trying to preserve their cultural traditions while adapting to their new environments. In so doing, they negotiate both a past that is receding and a future that can only be imagined.

    Conference Committee for the 2021 DAHS Conference - Traditions and Transitions: Ways of Being Danish​:

    • Lynette Rasmussen (Honorary Danish Consul, Des Moines, Iowa)
    • Linda Steffensen (Editor of Den Danske Pioneer, Chicago, Illinois)
    • ​Julie K. Allen (Professor, College of Humanities, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah)​

    • June 12, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • Oaks Amusement Park, Portland, OR

    MIDSUMMER FESTIVAL

    In the Northern lands of the midnight sun, it's tradition to celebrate the sun and the fire element during the summer solstice. We at Nordic Northwest honor this tradition by celebrating with Midsummer Festival

    Join your friends and family in SE Portland to ring in the 92nd year of this historic, regional tradition that occurs each June. We are an inclusive community, welcoming of all. Midsummer continues to be a fun, family friendly and important day with centuries-old traditions and everyone is invited!

    Enjoy delicious Nordic cuisine, try traditional beverages and scrumptious sweets. Spend the day with us and make your own colorful flower crown and other crafts. Play "Viking Chess", Nordic Jenga and other fun games. Take a break in the beer garden before we all come together and dance around the Maypole and sign Nordic folk songs. With two stages of entertainment which includes live music and traditional dancing, you are sure to have a memorable day.

    Make sure to take home some souvenirs from one of the many Nordic makers and artists who will have their booths open all day for you to browse and shop. 

    2021 Festival scheduled for June 12

    Oaks Amusement Park
    7805 SE Oaks Park Way
    Portland, OR

    Telephone - (503) 977-0275
    Nordic Northwest Website

    Nordic Northwest Facebook


    • June 25, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • June 27, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • Menucha Retreat & Conference Center - Corbett, OR

    2021 DANISH AMERICAN CULTURAL RETREAT

    Be sure to reserve June 25 to 27for the Danish American Cultural Retreat also held at the Menucha Retreat Center in Corbett, Oregon. Interesting programs about Denmark, topics revolving around history and modern times, and book re views have all been on the agenda. We reserve the amount of space we need well in advance so be sure to watch for registration dates. Both Himmelbjerget and DACR are held near Corbett, Oregon at the beautiful Menucha Retreat and Conference Center. 

    Menucha Retreat and Conference Center
    38711 E Historic Columbia River Hwy
    Corbett, OR  97019

    Telephone (NWDA) - 206-523-3263
    Emailseattle@nwdanish.org  

    NWDA Website

    NWDA Facebook

    • June 27, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • July 03, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • Menucha Retreat & Conference Center - Corbett, OR

    2021 HIMMELBJERGET DANISH CAMP

    Himmelbjerget Danish Camp offers a unique opportunity for kids 10 to 18 to learn about the history, people, culture, language and traditions of Denmark at a week- long overnight summer camp in the Columbia Gorge.


    Menucha Retreat and Conference Center
    38711 E Historic Columbia River Hwy
    Corbett, OR  97019

    Telephone (NWDA) - 206-523-3263
    Emailseattle@nwdanish.org

    NWDA Website

    NWDA Facebook

    • July 03, 2021
    • 12:00 PM (CDT)
    • July 05, 2021
    • 1:00 PM (CDT)
    • Rebild National Park near Aalborg, Denmark

    REBILD FESTIVAL IN DENMARK

    Celebration of Danish American Friendship - The annual Rebild Festival at the Rebild National Park near Aalborg, Denmark

    Official Detailed 2021 Schedule to be Announced

    July 3 - Rebild Park events and Gala in Aalborg

    July 4 - Tent Luncheon and Festival in the Rebild Hills

    July 5 - General Membership Meeting

    http://www.danishrebildsociety.com

    https://www.rebildfesten.dk


    • September 01, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • September 01, 2025
    • (CDT)
    • 5 sessions

    BODTKER GRANTS - DEADLINE

    Deadline for Submission: September 15

    The Danish American Heritage Society is pleased to offer grants to qualified researchers for study in area of common interest. Bodtker Grants provide stipends of up to $5,000 for students or graduates interested in exploring  topics related to Danish history and heritage in North America. 


    A Bodtker Grant is primarily intended for research and internship at Danish American Archive and Library in Blair, Nebraska; the Danish American Archive at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa; or the Museum of Danish America in Elk Horn, Iowa. At the Board's discretion, proposals involving other Danish cultural and archival institutions may be considered.

    Deadlines: April 15 (Notification: May) or September 15(Notification: October)
    Stipend Amount: Up to $5,000

    Grant Application

    DAHS Website



National Foundation for Danish America
PO Box 1003
Wilmette, Illinois 60091

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