event Calendar

pacific northwest United States (or, wa)

    • August 10, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • August 14, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • Nordic Northwest - Portland, OR

    Welcome Back! 
    Nordia House is now open! Nordic Northwest is concerned and cares about the health and well-being of each guest at Nordia House and we are taking the all the precautions we can during this time of the COVID-19 pandemic.  We cannot eliminate all risk, but we are following Oregon mandates and guidelines and have a  regimented disinfectant schedule to mitigate risk exposure. Below are the precautions we are taking to help you and others enjoy your time at Nordia House. 

    What’s Open & Hours: 

    Nordic Northwest is open to the public Thursday to Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

    Broder Söder Café is open Thursday to Sunday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. with expanded patio space 

    Nordic Finnware is temporarily closed 

    For Your Visit to Nordia House 

    • Face coverings are required when inside - except for dining and unless the individual is: under 12 years of age; has a medical condition that makes it hard to breath or has a disability that prevents the individual from wearing a face covering. If you do not have a face covering on, you will be asked to leave.  
    • If waiting for a table or appointment, please use the outside area.
    • Visit Nordia House at less popular times of the day. If you see many people, consider visiting another time. 
    • For outdoor use - pack a blanket or chair to relax on.  
    • Keep at least 6 feet from others.  
    • Do not congregate 
    • Follow one-way traffic patterns 
    • Observe entrances and exits.  
    • Wash your hands before and after visiting.  
    • Follow local and national health guidance.  
    • Go solo or only with members of your household, avoid groups.  
    • Stay at home if you’re feeling sick or have been in contact with someone who is sick. 

    Nordic Northwest encourages our community to learn more on how to prepare themselves and protect each other with the information related to COVID-19. Visit the  Oregon Health Authority website, or if you prefer, to receive information by phone please call 211. 

    Our thoughts go out to those who have been affected at this time. 

    Nordic Northwest Website

    • August 12, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • August 28, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Danish Sisterhood of America

    DANISH SISTERHOOD OF AMERICA 
    Recommendations during COVID-19 Pandemic

    July 24, 2020

    Dear members, friends and lodge leaders of the Danish Sisterhood of America,

    In this time of global concern about the spread of COVID-19 and based on recommendations and information from the CDC (The Center for Disease Control and Prevention), state and local agencies, the Danish Sisterhood’s main focus is to protect our members and limit the spread of COVID-19. It is critical that we continue to protect the health and well-being of our communities and work to not overwhelm our health care system.

    Local lodges are urged to suspend gatherings and events until your local health department and leaders recommend in-person meetings. As we mentioned earlier this year, if your district convention is cancelled and your lodge will incur a cancellation fee, please contact a member of the National Board.

    We encourage you to reach out to your Sisters. Use video calls and video conference technology such as Zoom to hold your monthly gatherings. A number of our lodges have are successfully using Zoom and finding they are able to enjoy the participation of members from far away. Reach out to your National Board if you have not yet tried Zoom and are curious.

    The Supreme Lodge recognizes that many of our members fall within the high risk category established by the CDC.

    The entire board urges you to continue to take the necessary precautions and stay safe and healthy.

    Christina Sallee, National President

    ~~~~~~~~~~

    Follow us on Facebook to keep up to date on news and events within the Danish Sisterhood.

    Danish Sisterhood Website


    • August 12, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • December 30, 2020
    • (CST)
    • 41 sessions
    • Online Concerts

    JESSICA LYNNE

    Online Concerts on Facebook

    Tour and Tickets

    My story is not ordinary. I feel pretty ordinary, on the inside. But when I tell people where I come from and how I got here, it usually stirs up a gasp or two. My official story simply states that I grew up in Denmark and now live in the Pacific Northwest, but there is much more to it than that. So I decided to tell it. 

    My childhood was spent divided on three different continents. Strangest of all, I was born in South America. Valdivia, Chile to be exact. My parents were missionaries, but soon after my arrival, they decided to move back to the US. I was 6 months old. Needless to say, I don't remember anything from Chile at all. I ended up with dual citizenship - but not a Chilean one, as you might think, but a Danish/American citizenship. 

    My parents met in New York. My mom, from a small town of Sejlflod in Jylland, Denmark. My Dad from the Pacific Northwest. So when they decided, with 6 months old me in their arms to move back to the US, they settled on Tacoma, WA. Kind of fortuitous that my journey should lead me back here - only about 10 blocks away from my first American home. But that's for a later chapter. 

    My parents divorced when I was three and my mother decided to move us, three girls, to Denmark. First Skanderborg, then what I now consider my hometown, Haslev. This is where I went to school, where I had friends, where I learned about life, and love and longing. This is where I grew up. If you can call yourself a "grown-up" at 17; that's when I moved away from home. 
    I then became what I would call a "Copenhagen nomade" moving almost 25 times in the 13 or so years I lived there, interrupted only by a 2-year stint in Barcelona - also a story for another chapter.

    I finally up-rooted, if I ever had roots, and moved to the Pacific Northwest in 2010 when I was 31.

    And that's the short, cliff notes version story. But that's not really how I want to tell it. I want to tell my story by delving into how that story made me, me. What it was like, being a part of two worlds, and what sometimes felt like not being a part of anything at all. Feeling like an outsider for all the wrong reasons, trying so hard to belong, but not feeling like I belonged at all.
    As a child, I would spend the entire year going to school and living my life in Haslev and every other summer I would visit my Dad in Seattle. The alternating summers, he would visit us. I spoke (and still do speak) both languages fluently... mostly without an accent in either language. My dad would call every week long-distance to keep in touch with us girls. And in the '80s that was not cheap! My mom, even though she is 100% Dane, would make traditional Danish cooking right alongside fried chicken and cornbread. I felt the duality every day. 

    Consequently, it somehow made me feel divided. Instead of belonging everywhere, I felt like I didn't belong anywhere. 
    I suppose, with a different outlook on life, this duality could have made me feel abundant, like a citizen of the world, who had many homes. But my upbringing in so many ways nourished lack and dependence. And it made me feel stretched too thin. I was too American to be Danish and too Danish to be American. So I was, effectively, neither.

    Every time I came back to Denmark I would miss the US terribly. But it was never actually true the other way around. This only occurred to me when I finally moved here, that the homesickness I would feel for the US when gone, never set in for Denmark. Yes, I missed my family, but not the culture, not the place itself. 

    In reality, moving to the US clarified a lot of things for me. I have always been more American than Danish, I know that now. I've been loud, brazen, and always had big dreams and big gestures. Not in any way the proper little girl my mother tried to raise me to be. I had a terrible temper, that felt uncontrollable at times and a big voice that was repeatedly told to not shine too brightly, not to make the other kids feel bad. 

    This may seem harsh, but anyone from Denmark would notice this as "Janteloven" or "The Law of Jante" - a culturally-induced oppression that the Danes all know too well. Again, this is a phenomenon I will explain in depth in another chapter. Suffice it to say, it's a classic "crabs in a bucket" syndrome. When one tries to climb out the others will pull it back down.

    So I suppose I was not entirely caught in the middle. I sometimes describe myself as "half-and-half", with a chuckle. But that doesn't really describe me. In reality, I am more like 75/25. In the last ten years, I have learned to embrace my Danish roots, while also fully encompassing how American I really am. Immigrant heritage and all. 

    In truth, it probably doesn't matter what continent we are on. Denmark for me was a time in my life when I tried to hide who I truly was, in order to try and fit in. It was a time of listening to others over my own intuition, my inner voice. It was a time of not being and owning who I truly am and what my life's purpose is. The US for me has been the journey of fully growing into my true self. A journey of growth and self-exploration. Of owning all sides of me, even the ones I don't necessarily like. And most importantly listening to my own truth rather than what others say. It's not about Denmark and it's not about the US. It's about what each country represents to me and who I became during each timeframe I spent there. 

    I can now look at being "half-and-half" and feel grateful that I was blessed with so much diversity. And I can own my big voice and my larger than life attitude and put myself on a stage and feel right at home. But I can also remember where I came from, and what is truly important in life. Love of family, love of friends and most importantly, self-love.
    • August 14, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • September 15, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • American-Scandinavian Foundation - New York, NY

    ASF TRANSLATION AWARDS

    Application Deadline: Extended - September 15, 2020

    The American-Scandinavian Foundation annually awards three translation prizes for outstanding translations of poetry, fiction, drama, or literary prose written by a Scandinavian author born after 1900.

    Submission Information
    Entry deadline:
    September 15

    The Nadia Christensen Prize includes a $2,500 award, publication of an excerpt in Scandinavian Review, and a commemorative bronze medallion.

    The Leif and Inger Sjöberg Award, given to an individual whose literature translations from a Nordic language have not previously been published, includes a $2,000 award, publication of an excerpt in Scandinavian Review, and a commemorative bronze medallion.

    The Wigeland Prize, given to the best translation by a Norwegian, includes a $2,000 award, publication of an excerpt in Scandinavian Review, and a commemorative bronze medallion.

    —Apply Now!

    Rules

    1. The prizes are for outstanding English translations of poetry, fiction, drama or literary prose originally written in a Nordic language.
    2. If prose, manuscripts must be no longer than 50 pages; if poetry, 25 (Do not exceed these limits). Manuscripts must be typed and double-spaced with numbered pages.
    3. Translations must be from the writing of one author, although not necessarily from a single work. Please include a one-paragraph description about the author.
    4. An entry must consist of:
      • One copy of the translation, including a title page and a table of contents for the proposed book of which the manuscript submitted is a part. 
      • One copy of the work(s) in the original language; please send the relevant pages.
      • A CV containing all contact information, including email address, for the translator; and
      • A letter or other document signed by the author, the author’s agent or the author’s estate granting permission for the translation to be entered in this competition and published in Scandinavian Review.
    1. Translator’s names may not appear on any page of their manuscripts, including the title page.
    2. The translation submitted in the competition may not have been previously published in the English language by the submission deadline.
      (If the translation being submitted to this competition is also under consideration by a publisher, you must inform us of the expected publication date.)
    3. Translators may submit one entry only and may not submit the same entry in more than two competitions.
    4. The Translation Prize cannot be won more than three times by the same translator.
    Previous ASF Translation Prize Opening and Winners.pdf

    INFO@AMSCAN.ORG
    SCANDINAVIAHOUSE.ORG
    AMSCAN.ORG

    • August 14, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • August 31, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Anywhere, Seattle, WA US 98107

    NATIONAL NORDIC MUSEUM RUN LIKE A VIKING CHALLENGE

    Let the Museum inspire you to keep moving and remain active, while having fun with your friends and family! Run Like a Viking will take place over five (5) weeks during our virtual summer celebration Nordic Sol: Nordic by Nature! Participants can choose between a 5K, 10K or half marathon and since we are going virtual, national and international participation is encouraged! Starting July 25, log your miles as you run outside, walk on a treadmill, bike, kayak, skateboard—whatever way you move counts toward your mileage. Bonus points if you do it while dressed like a Viking! All entrants will receive a custom Run Like a Viking T-shirt, downloadable racing bib, and two (2) general admission tickets to the National Nordic Museum.

     www.nordicmuseum.org/

    • August 14, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • August 31, 2020
    • (CDT)
    NORDIC SÓL CELEBRATION 

    The National Nordic Museum’s new summer cultural showcase, Nordic Sól, returns in 2020 for an entire month of virtual activities.

    Focusing on the beauty of the outdoors, the importance of sustainability, and what nature means to both residents of the Pacific Northwest and the Nordic countries, you'll find programming for all ages including a new T-Shirt Design Contest, a virtual run and a virtual Artisan Marketplace.

    This year's line-up includes artists, instructors, experts, and friends galore for virtual book talks, art classes, demonstrations, and more. To get reminders by email, sign up for our newsletter at nordicmuseum.org/newsletter.

    https://www.nordicmuseum.org/nordicsol

    • August 15, 2020
    • (EDT)
    • September 26, 2020
    • (EDT)
    • 7 sessions
    • Online - Hans Christian Andersen Storytelling Center New York

    HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN STORYTELLING CENTER ONLINE

    SATURDAY MORNING HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN STORYTELLING GOES VIRTUAL

    A SIXTY FOUR YEAR NEW YORK TRADITION PREVAILS

    HCA Storytelling Online 

    Saturday Mornings from 11 am to Noon (Eastern Time)
    Storytellers from throughout the world tell Andersen’s iconic stories
    From Central Park to Your Home anywhere in the world 

    This year the Hans Christian Andersen Story Telling Center, Inc. (“HCASTC”)  is proud to launch a 2020 Live On-line Season starting on May 30th.   World renowned New York storyteller and artistic director of the HCASTC, Laura Simms,  has curated a season of stories told by the  best  storytellers from across the globe.  Different Andersen stories will be told every week. 

    Click Here for the Complete Schedule

    Hans Christian Andersen’s stories are the  most translated literature next to the Bible.   His stories, penned in the nineteenth Century, have been delighting audiences worldwide since. They  were created as commentaries for social injustice and inequality.  They remain  contemporary  and thrill children and adults alike with their array of fabulous characters including the Ugly Duckling who overcomes bullying and the Emperor Without Clothes whose vanity and idiocy is exposed by a child.  Kindness, humor, and the power of imagination and truth prevails. 

    If you are looking for something wonderful and valuable to share with your family in these times, join us for live performances on Saturdays at 11 a.m. straight to your kitchen or living room or garden. Recorded The link for our live performance will be on our website shortly. performances will subsequently be made available on our YouTube channel and on Facebook. Our website will also have those links. The program will continue through the end of September. If social distancing rules permit, live performances may be resumed in Central Park later during the season. Stories have always been the most brilliant and engaging way to start a great conversation.   Let the tale of the Nightingale about authenticity and real communication lift your spirits.  The poignant  tales of The Last Pearl and The Little Match Girl soothe your heart. And laugh out loud with the tales of Jack, The Dullard and the Swineherd. We will have mornings of Andersen’s longer irresistible tales of the Snow Queen (the real story behind Frozen), The Wild Swans, or The Little Mermaid. 

    Storytelling is entertaining. It is also life confirming. It keeps imagination and faith alive.  Technology has helped us immensely through this time, but put away the laptop when the story is over and talk together about the stories.  Tell your own. And keep up a tradition that has been ongoing for 64 years.  

    There is a restorative power in storytelling. The most experienced and wonderful storytellers will support a sense of inner safety while exploring profound resolutions to emotional experiences. Research has shown that listening to stories helps increase empathy and navigate challenging times. AND it improves the ability to  feel closer to one another by building connection among  people.  Let’s strengthen our sense of being one global  community. 

    What better time in which to shrink  physical distances and join us mind to mind across the world.

    HCASTC has been freely delivering stories to New Yorkers of all ages since 1956, rain or shine from its signature location at the Statue of Hans Christian Andersen in Central Park (72nd Street and 5th Avenue). We bring stories, and the Park  into your home. 

    HCASTC is a nonprofit organization that, aside from its historical site, has been bringing storytelling projects in schools, and is partnering with the Andersen Museum in Odense, Denmark, hometown of the author, HCASTC is supported by private donors, contributions from listeners,  and the Parks Department of New York City. For the last 64 years it has been proudly offering spoken word performances that gathered thousands of families throughout the summer months. This is still today kept as a gift: an open invitation for us all to meet in the spirit of Andersen’s love for justice, children and literature.

    For detailed information, please visit our website at http://www.hcastorycenter.org

     

    • August 19, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • August 21, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Danebod Folk School - Tyler, MN

    VIRTUAL EVENT - 74th ANNUAL DANEBOD FOLK MEETING

    Danebod Website

    Due to the COVID-19 virus the Danebod campus in Tyler, MN is closed for the summer 2020.

    The 2020 Danebod Folk Meeting will be an on-line activity affirming the joy of living through enlightenment. The meeting will feature music, stories and lectures.

    You are invited to attend the on-line activity planned for August 19-21. We invite you to whip up a batch of kringle, brew a cup of coffee, and join us virtually on Zoom.

    View schedule, programming  and registration information on the website. Registration for this event is $150.  Please submit your registration and payment no later than July 15.

    There will be a Zoom tutorial held at 10 AM, Wednesday August 19, 2020.

    Link to Registration

    Danebod Folk Meeting

    140 Danebod Court | Tyler, MN 56178 | (507) 247-3000

    danebodlutheran@yahoo.com | rickeann64@gmail.com


    • September 18, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • September 20, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Online Event

    DANISH AMERICAN CULTURAL RETREAT

    2020 Retreat has been rescheduled!

    Be sure to reserve September 18-20th for the Danish American Cultural Retreat. Usually  held at the Menucha Retreat Center in Corbett, Oregon, this year's event will be held virtually via Zoom. Interesting programs about Denmark, topics revolving around history and modern times, and book reviews have all been on the agenda. 

    Sign in on the Northwest Danish Association website for more information. 

    Telephone (NWDA) - 206-523-3263
    seattle@nwdanish.org
    www.northwestdanish.org

    • September 20, 2020
    • 11:00 AM (CDT)
    • Online - Zoom Meeting

    REBILD NATIONAL PARK SOCIETY - ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING

    Online meeting of Rebild Membership - Denmark and U.S.A.


    Rebild Website

    Rebild Facebook

    • October 04, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Online - Zoom Meeting

    REBILD NATIONAL PARK SOCIETY - FALL LEADERSHIP MEETING

    Online meeting of Rebild Leadership - Denmark and U.S.A.


    Rebild Website

    Rebild Facebook

    • February 10, 2021
    • (CST)
    • February 10, 2025
    • (CST)
    • 5 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - BENEDICTE MARIE WRENSTED

    Benedicte Marie Wrensted (February 10, 1859 – January 19, 1949) was a notable Danish-American photographer best known for the many photographs she took of the Shoshone native people in Idaho. She is remembered for her documentation of the Northern Shoshone, Lemhi, and Bannock tribes in Idaho between 1895-1912.

    Born in Hjørring, Jutland, Benedicte learned photography (one the the few professions considered suitable for women at the time) from her aunt, Charlotte Borgen. She then opened her own studio in Horsens, which she ran until she emigrated to the United States in 1894. 

    After arriving in America, Benedicte moved to Pocatello, Idaho where her brother Peter had settled. Here she acquired a studio in 1895 where she took photographs of the local inhabitants and recorded the growth of the town. Her documentary photographs of the Shoshone and Bannock Native Americans are still considered to be of great anthropological importance. Many of her Native American images are preserved at the Smithsonian Institution and the National Archives.

    Wrensted's parents were Captain Carl V. Wrensted, later an innkeeper, and Johanne Borgen.  She grew up and attended school in Frederikshavn in the far north of Jutland. One of the few professions considered suitable for women at the time was photography. Wrensted learnt the craft in the 1880s from her aunt, Charlotte Borgen, who was a photographer in Frederikshavn.  She then opened a studio of her own in Horsens.

    She was known for her expressive handling of natural light and the painterly quality of her photographs. Wrensted photographed The Edmos, a prominent Native American family from the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, quite often.

    Wrensted became a U.S. citizen in 1912, at age 53, and the same year she ended her career as a photographer. She sold her studio in Pocatello and moved to Los Angeles where she died on January 19, 1949 shortly before her 90th birthday.

    Many of her Native American images are preserved at the Smithsonian Institution and the National Archives. In the fall of 1984, Smithsonian anthropologist, Joanna Cohan Scherer was looking for photographs in the Smithsonian Institute's "Handbook of North American Indian" and came across the clutter of the Bannock County Historical Society in Pocatello, Idaho. She came across some Bannock County images that had the imprint "B. Wrensted, Pocatello." After rediscovering these photographs and finding a collection of glass plate negatives in the National Archives labeled "Portraits of Indians from Southeastern Idaho Reservations, 1897".she was determined to find out more about Wrensted. She consulted tribal elders from the nearby Fort Hall Indian Reservation, wrote letters to people, checked business directories and looked through tons of museums and libraries in an effort to uncover the background of Wrensted and her photographs. The Idaho Museum of Natural History has a goal of demonstrating ways in which photographs can be placed within a historical context. Only 1% of Wrensted's images at the National Archives and Records Administration were identified at the onset of a digital library collection project. Once they were shown to the descendants at the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, information regarding families of origin were discovered and with the help of written records, 84% of Wrensted subjects have now been identified.

    Scherer encourages the reader to "go beyond consideration of Wrensted's portraits as art," by advocating for the identification of the individual people portrayed in the photos as a means of avoiding stereotyping and the characterization of generic Indians as more "noble savages". "What sets Wrensted's work apart," says Schere, "is her skill in portraying the humanity—the individuality—of the people who posed for her. She captured their presence with a dignity and beauty that transcend time and place." According to Scherer's estimates, today 170 of Wrensted's Shoshone Bannock images are known to exist in various collections, with a substantial number at the Idaho Museum of Natural History. Wrensted's photographs of her Indian subjects were not left with the people of the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, but were, as Scherer tells us, "uprooted from their place of origin and put into impersonal hands—namely, the National Archives in Washington, D.C."

    Idaho State University - Benedicte Wrensted Collection:

    View Collection Online

    • May 05, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • May 09, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • Renaissance Hotel - Seattle, WA

    DANISH AMERICAN HERITAGE SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

    2021 Danish American Heritage Society Conference
    Traditions and Transitions: Ways of Being Danish
    May 5-9, 2021 (Thursday-Sunday)




    ​Venue
    Renaissance Seattle Hotel
     515 Madison St, Seattle, WA 98104
    +1 206-583-0300​

    Picture

    ​The Danish American Heritage Society is pleased to announce and invites you to attend our next international conference on May 5-9, 2021 at the Renaissance Seattle Hotel in Seattle, Washington. This conference is being held in conjunction with the 111th annual meeting of the Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study.
    The organizing theme of our conference is “Traditions and Transitions: Ways of Being Danish,” which we hope will provide ample scope for exploring the identities and experiences of Danes and Danish Americans past and present. We also invite the submission of proposals for papers and presentations on topics related to this theme, which may include (but are not limited to):

    • The role of religious, educational, and/or artistic institutions, such as Danish folk high schools, in shaping and preserving Danish traditions
    • Literary, artistic, cinematic, and/or musical depictions of individual and social transitions
    • Culinary and handicraft traditions of Danes and Danish Americans
    • Political and economic transitions, such as the 1917 sale of the Virgin Islands or joining the European Union, that inspired new traditions and challenged old ones
    • Linguistic shifts in Danish and English related to people in transit
    • Translation into and out of Danish and its dialects
    • Past and present migrations into, within, and out of Denmark

    ​Individual presenters wishing to submit a proposal for a paper or presentation of 20 minutes should send their name, email address, paper title, abstract (maximum 300 words), and a short biography of the speaker (maximum 150 words) to dahs2021conference@gmail.com by October 1, 2020.

    Although cultures may seem to be fixed, they are always in transition, navigating between tried and true traditions and new opportunities and innovations. Even the potato, which seems today to be a quintessential part of Danish food culture, was a novel import in the 17th century that seemed both foreign and somewhat suspect. Cultural heritage is the product of many generations’ attempts to hold on to practices and beliefs that give meaning to their identities as members of a national, linguistic, or ethnic group, while also dealing with the changes and challenges that they inevitably encounter. People in transit, particularly those who leave their homelands for prolonged periods of time, are also in a state of “in-betweenness,” trying to preserve their cultural traditions while adapting to their new environments. In so doing, they negotiate both a past that is receding and a future that can only be imagined.

    Conference Committee for the 2021 DAHS Conference - Traditions and Transitions: Ways of Being Danish​:

    • Lynette Rasmussen (Honorary Danish Consul, Des Moines, Iowa)
    • Linda Steffensen (Editor of Den Danske Pioneer, Chicago, Illinois)
    • ​Julie K. Allen (Professor, College of Humanities, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah)​

    • June 12, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • Oaks Amusement Park, Portland, OR

    MIDSUMMER FESTIVAL

    2020 Midsummer Festival is Canceled, but virtual activities online.

    2020 Virtual Festival - June 13-20


    Oregon Midsummer (Virtual) Festival 2020 Begins on Saturday!

    In the Northern lands of the midnight sun, it's tradition to celebrate the sun and fire elements during the summer solstice. 


    We at Nordic Northwest honor this tradition by celebrating with Oregon Midsummer Festival. This year we are celebrating together with a week-long digital experience and everyone is invited!


    Midsummer continues to be an important event with centuries-old traditions. Browse through our curated collection of videos and learn how to make delicious Nordic cuisine, watch local performers from the Nordic community in PNW, and sing with live musicians! We have also partnered with a virtual market place where you can support small Nordic businesses. 


    This will be a unique digital experience with live and on-demand performances. You are sure to have a memorable week at no cost so make your own flower crown and get your aquavit ready.

    In the Northern lands of the midnight sun, it's tradition to celebrate the sun and the fire element during the summer solstice. We at Nordic Northwest honor this tradition by celebrating with Midsummer Festival.

    Join your friends and family in SE Portland to ring in the 92nd year of this historic, regional tradition that occurs each June. We are an inclusive community, welcoming of all. Midsummer continues to be a fun, family friendly and important day with centuries-old traditions and everyone is invited!

    Enjoy delicious Nordic cuisine, try traditional beverages and scrumptious sweets. Spend the day with us and make your own colorful flower crown and other crafts. Play "Viking Chess", Nordic Jenga and other fun games. Take a break in the beer garden before we all come together and dance around the Maypole and sign Nordic folk songs. With two stages of entertainment which includes live music and traditional dancing, you are sure to have a memorable day.

    Make sure to take home some souvenirs from one of the many Nordic makers and artists who will have their booths open all day for you to browse and shop. 

    2021 Festival scheduled for June 12

    Oaks Amusement Park
    7805 SE Oaks Park Way
    Portland, OR

    Telephone - (503) 977-0275
    Nordic Northwest Website

    Nordic Northwest Facebook


    • June 23, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • June 23, 2024
    • (CDT)
    • 4 sessions

    Sankt Hans Aften (Midsummer)

    A Nordic tradition, celebrated on the night before the Midsummer's Day

    Midsummer's Eve or Sankt Hans Aften is a relic of pagan customs, where the shortest day, the winter solstice, and the longest day, the summer solstice, were celebrated. Originally it was believed that midsummer night was filled with magical forces of nature—both bad and good. All herbs and sources were particularly sacred, and it was a tradition to seek sacred springs or picking healing herbs on this night.

    The tradition of burning bonfires came later. Originally they were not associated with Midsummer's Eve celebration, although later some farmers who believed in witches started burning bonfires on this night. A shape that looks like a witch was put in the fire. The purpose of the fire was to scare the witches and evil spirits away, rather than burning them.

    Today the Midsummer's Eve is still celebrated with bonfires, dancing, singing and a traditional speech from someone well known in the community. The celebrations are held all around the country, both in cities and small towns.

    Some of the most vibrant celebrations take place in Copenhagen, Odense, Aarhus, and Skagen. The capital has bonfires at several places, including Tivoli Gardens, Frederiksberg Gardens, Islands Brygge, and more. Likewise, Aarhus offers quite a few locations to celebrate, such as Aarhus University campus, Godsbanen, or Langenæs Church. In Odense, the festivities take place at Engen in the Fruens Bøge forest. At last, the remote Skagen promises an exceptional celebration. Thousands come to the northern tip of Denmark to enjoy traditional songs at the bonfire that lasts here longer than anywhere else in the country.

    Burning the witches in Denmark

    The height of Danish summer is celebrated on the evening of June 23 under the name Sankt Hans (Saint Hans), who is known in English as John the Baptist. The festival of Sankt Hans and the celebration of the summer solstice have pagan roots and date back to the days before Christianity came to Denmark. 

    Sankt Hans is generally celebrated with a dinner at home with family and friends followed by a stroll to a community bonfire, often by the beach or on the shore of one of Denmark's many lakes.

    Tradition calls for an effigy of a witch to be placed on top of the bonfire, and as it burns the community sings the song "Midsommervisen", written by the Danish poet Holger Drachmann in 1885. The effigy of the witch symbolises all the misery that Denmark as a nation wants to avoid, and the song celebrates the hope that peace will prevail.


    Midsommervisen “Vi elsker vort land”  
    (Youtube)

    De tre første vers, som normalt synges ved bålfester
    Text: Holger Drachmann, 1885
    Melodi P. E. Lange-Müller, 1885 

    Vi elsker vor land,
    når den signede jul
    tænder stjernen i træet med glans i hvert øje.
    Når om våren hver fugl,
    over mark, under strand,
    lader stemmen til hilsende triller sig bøje:
    Vi synger din lov over vej, over gade,
    vi kranser dit navn, når vor høst er i lade,
    men den skønneste krans,
    bli'r dog din Sankte Hans!
    Den er bunden af sommerens hjerter,
    så varme så glade. 

    Vi elsker vort land,
    men ved midsommer mest,
    når hver sky over marken velsignelsen sender,
    når af blomster er flest,
    og når kvæget i spand
    giver rigeligst gave til flittige hænder;
    når ikke vi pløjer og harver og tromler,
    når koen sin middag i kløveren gumler,
    da går ungdom til dans
    på dit bud Sankte Hans
    ret som føllet og lammet, der frit
    over engen sig tumler. 

    Vi elsker vort land,
    og med sværdet i hånd
    skal hver udenvælts fjende beredte os kende,
    men mod ufredens ånd
    under mark over strand,
    vil vi bålet på fædrenes gravhøje tænde
    hver by har sin heks,
    og hver sogn sine trolde.
    Dem vil vi fra livet med glædesblus holde
    vi vil fred her til lands
    Sankte Hans, Sankte Hans!
    Den kan vindes, hvor hjerterne
    aldrig bli'r tvivlende kolde
    .

    English Translation...

    Vi Elsker Vort Land/"We Love Our Country"

    We love our country
    when the blessed Christmas
    light up the star in the tree with a twinkle in each eye
    When in spring each bird
    over the field, down by the beach
    lets its voice give into greeting trills:
    We sing your law across the road, across the street,
    we wreath your name, when our harvest is in the barn,
    but the most beautiful wreath
    becomes yours, Saint Hans
    It is bound by the the hearts of the summer so warm, so happy
    but the most beautiful wreath
    becomes yours, Saint Hans
    It is bound by the hearts of the summer so warm, so happy

    We love our country
    but mostly around midsummer
    when every cloud sends the blessing across the field
    When most flowers are here
    and when the cattle drag the plough
    gives plenty of gifts to laborious hands;
    when we don't plough and harrow and roll,
    when the cow munch its dinner of clover:
    At that time youth will start to dance
    at your command Saint Hans!
    Straight as the foal and the lamb which freely romp across the meadow
    At that time youth will start to dance
    at your command Saint Hans!
    Straight as the foal and the lamb which freely romp across the meadow

    We love our country
    and with the sword in our hands
    every foreign enemy shall prepared know us
    But against the spirit of strife
    over the field, down by the beach
    we will light the bonfire on the forefathers' burial mounds:
    Every town has its witch, and every parish its trolls,
    we will keep those from our lives with fires of happiness
    We want peace in this country,
    saint Hans, saint Hans!
    It can be won where the hearts never become doubting cold
    We want peace in this country,
    saint Hans, saint Hans!
    It can be won where the hearts never become doubting cold

    We love our country
    and we greet that king
    who has tried and chosen the right princess:
    In his fairy tale castle
    every woman, every man can
    find an example of love for life!
    Let the times grow old, let the colors fade,
    we will however draw a memory in our hearts:
    From the North so rich in legends
    a glory goes across the world
    It is the reflection of the wonderland's enchanted meadows,
    From the North so rich in legends
    a glory goes across the world
    It is the reflection of the wonderland's enchanted meadows!

    • June 25, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • June 27, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • Menucha Retreat & Conference Center - Corbett, OR

    2021 DANISH AMERICAN CULTURAL RETREAT

    Be sure to reserve June 25 to 27for the Danish American Cultural Retreat also held at the Menucha Retreat Center in Corbett, Oregon. Interesting programs about Denmark, topics revolving around history and modern times, and book re views have all been on the agenda. We reserve the amount of space we need well in advance so be sure to watch for registration dates. Both Himmelbjerget and DACR are held near Corbett, Oregon at the beautiful Menucha Retreat and Conference Center. 

    Menucha Retreat and Conference Center
    38711 E Historic Columbia River Hwy
    Corbett, OR  97019

    Telephone (NWDA) - 206-523-3263
    Emailseattle@nwdanish.org  

    NWDA Website

    NWDA Facebook

    • June 27, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • July 03, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • Menucha Retreat & Conference Center - Corbett, OR

    2021 HIMMELBJERGET DANISH CAMP

    Himmelbjerget Danish Camp offers a unique opportunity for kids 10 to 18 to learn about the history, people, culture, language and traditions of Denmark at a week- long overnight summer camp in the Columbia Gorge.


    Menucha Retreat and Conference Center
    38711 E Historic Columbia River Hwy
    Corbett, OR  97019

    Telephone (NWDA) - 206-523-3263
    Emailseattle@nwdanish.org

    NWDA Website

    NWDA Facebook


National Foundation for Danish America
PO Box 1003
Wilmette, Illinois 60091

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