event Calendar

pacific northwest United States (or, wa)

    • May 28, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • June 05, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • National Nordic Museum - Seattle, WA

    ONLINE EVENTS - NATIONAL NORDIC MUSEUM

    Try The Museum's Folk School Online

    Folk School has gone virtual! A longtime tradition at the National Nordic Museum, the onsite Folk School series highlights traditional Nordic crafts, embracing the dynamic nature of traditional folk art and innovations. Expert Claudia Pétursson was not able to conduct her previously scheduled class at the Museum this spring but instead takes viewers through the Iceland's sagas, history, and embroidery through a 12-part series of videos. These lessons focus on the work of Njál's Saga Tapestry Sewing Centre. Since February 2013, a 90-meter-long tapestry depicting Njál's Saga – the best-known Icelandic saga – has been stitched by visitors to Hvolsvöllur, South IcelandThe designs were created by award-winning artist Kristin Ragna Gunnarsdottir and draw inspiration from medieval tapestries.

    The first six parts of the "Icelandic Saga Embroidery Series" are available for viewing now at the National Nordic Museum, with six more scheduled for June. See the current series at YouTube/NordicMuseum.

    While kits are available in the National Nordic Museum Store to recreate 
    Gunnarsdottir's patterns, anyone can follow along and practice these stitches for free using the videos and spare materials at home. Sale of kits helps support the Njál's Saga Tapestry Sewing Centre and the National Nordic Museum.

    Explore Copenhagen Under Lockdown


    When Denmark became one of the first northern European countries to undergo a strict lockdown, photographers Lasse Bak Mejlvang and Mads Eneqvist, headed out. Armed with cameras and hand sanitizer – on proper distance from each other – they wanted to see how Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark, had changed. Together they created a stunning series of photographs showing the emptiness and loneliness that the virus brought with it.

    Join the photographers virtually on May 31, 12pm-1pm, to discuss their work and see how the city coped.

    "Covid Copenhagen" lecture is hosted by National Nordic Museum. The event is free but registration is required. See nordicmuseum.org/calendar.

    Lasse Bak Mejlvang was part of the past photography exhibit Legacy on display at the National Nordic Museum earlier this year.

    • June 01, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 15, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Nordic Northwest - Portland, OR

    NORDIC NORTHWEST TEMPORARILY CLOSED

    March 17, 2020-
    For health and safety, Nordic Northwest has decided to close its doors until further notice.
     

    Nordic Northwest is monitoring the Coronavirus pandemic closely to ensure the safety of its members, volunteers, guests and staff.

    Nordia House and the Fogelbo grounds continues to remain closed to the public. 

    Nordic Northwest events are either postponed or canceled.

    The Board will continue to monitor government directives and mandates closely and update our operations and schedule. We will continue to communicate this information through this weekly E-news, website updates and social media. 

    We hope this message finds you and your loved ones well. Please take care and we look forward to having you return to Nordia House when it is safe.

    Nordia House is currently closed to the public but have limited staffing in the office. You may reach staff by phone Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or please email info@nordicnorthwest.org

    Nordic Northwest Website

    • June 04, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 18, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Northwest Danish Association - Seattle, WA

    NORTHWEST DANISH ASSOCIATION UPDATE - JUNE 4

    Northwest Danish News

    Less than one month until the new membership year!

    The new NWDA membership year is from July 1st 2020 to June 30th 2021. Renew your membership or become a new member today!

    Membership benefits include:

    Annual membership costs:

    • $35 for a senior or student membership
    • $50 for an adult individual membership
    • Membership options for couples and families are also available

    Click here to sign up for the 2020-2021 membership year today:

    Become a Member

    Interested in a membership for your business or organization? Visit our community partnership page to view your options.

    Follow us on 

    social media!

    Facebook ‌ Instagram ‌ Twitter ‌

    NWDA Membership:

    Join our Danish community in the PNW and enjoy membership perks!

    Become a Member

    Donations

    Make a gift today to support our programs for the Danish community:

    Donate Now

    NWDA office is still closed. The NWDA office and the Seattle Danish Center are closed until further notice.


    To get into contact with us, e-mail:

    Edith Christensen at seattle@nwdanish.orgor Line Larsen at line@nwdanish.org


    All NWDA events in June have been cancelled or moved online.

    Danish Landscapes by Claus Windelev

    This week's featured drawing by local Danish artist, Claus Windelev, is Gedesby Mølle. The windmill is located in Gedser on the Southeastern tip of Denmark on Falster.

    NWDA is currently featuring drawings from Claus' new series, "Danish Landscapes." Many of you know Claus as a longtime member of NWDA and a current board member. Check the e-bulletin each week for another Danish landscape by Claus. For other art by Claus, visit his website: www.windelev.us

    Virtual Events

    Summer Classes: Learn Danish from home! 

    Is your Danish rusty? Spruce up your Danish language skills this summer! The Summer Term of the Seattle-based Danish Class will be held online via Zoom. Adrian Tan will lead the weekly conversational lessons and discussions about Denmark!

    Summer Term: June 20th to July 18th (5 sessions)

    Saturday mornings 9:00 am to 10:30 am

    Level: Intermediate

    If you are unsure if this class is right for you and your level of Danish, get in touch with us: seattle@nwdanish.org

    Registrations are now open! Space is limited, sign up online:

    Sign up here

    Danish American Cultural Retreat 2020 

    June 19th 2020

    The program for the Danish American Cultural Retreat 2020 will be a virtual exploration of topics related to Denmark.

    Registrations will soon be open. The program will be released on June 19th 2020.



    Himmelbjerget Danish Camp 2020

    Late June 2020

    The Himmelbjerget counselors are working on putting together online activities for this year's Danish Camp!

    Stay tuned for more details.

    The Hiking Viking: A Fundraiser

    This summer, Bruce Bro from the National Foundation for Danish America is embarking on a hiking adventure! The hike will be a fundraiser for Danish organizations across the country, including the Northwest Danish Association!

    You can make your pledge now. Visit the NFDA website for more information!

    Other

    Summer 2020:

    June 19 -21: 

    Danish American Cultural Retreat

    Postponed until 2021. A virtual program will be available in 2020!

    June 21 - 27: 

    Himmelbjerget Danish Camp

    Postponed until 2021. Watch for online camp activities in 2020!

    August 3 - 7: 

    Dane Camp for Little Vikings(Seattle) 

    Please watch for announcements

    August 9: 

    Danish Community Picnic(Seattle)

    Please watch for announcements

    Note: These summer programs are subject to change.

    Danish Library

    The Seattle Danish Centerfeatures a library with over 

    2,000 books and films.  

    NWDA Library Catalog

    Network:

    Looking for housing, jobs, or other opportunities? Visit the

    NWDA Networking Platform

    NWDA Programs:

    Eldercare Program

    Scholarship Program

    Danish Language Programs

    Monthly Events (cancelled until 

    further notice):

    Fredagscafe: 1st Friday 

    (except Jan & Jul)

    Work Party1st Tuesday

    (except Jul & Aug)

    Torsdagsklubben3rd Thursday

    (except Jul & Aug)

    "The Little Mermaid" is our quarterly newsletter.

    Read The Little Mermaid

    "Snapshots - Traveling with H.C. Andersen" - Online Exhibition

    "To travel is to live," said Danish fairy tale author, H.C. Andersen. See his words come to life in "Snapshots," an exhibition by Danish artist, Susanne Thea.

    View the Exhibit

    A big thank you to the National Foundation for Danish America for providing support for this traveling exhibit to open at the Seattle Danish Center.

    Nordic Community Events

    Virtual Midsommar by Nordic Northwest

    Schedule coming soon. Visit Nordic Northwest website for more information. 

    HCA Pic

    Hans Christian Andersen Virtual Storytelling 

    On Saturday mornings you can tune in to HC Andersen storytelling online. This has been a New York tradition for 64 years!

    Join in online at 8:00 am PST (11am EDT) on Saturdays.

    Portland-Based Danish Duolingo Group

    Conversations in Danish led by Aage Nielsen

    4th Sunday each month

    1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

    Classes are held online.

    Contact us to add your community events here! Email seattle@nwdanish.org

    Northwest Danish Association

    Seattle Office 

    1833 N. 105th St. Ste. 101  

    Seattle, WA 98133 

    (206) 523-3263 


    *Direct all mail and all emails to the Seattle office*

    Portland Meeting Place

    "Danebo"

    9498 SW Barbur Blvd. Suite 207

    Portland, OR 97219

    (Please do not send mail to this address)


    For information from Portland 

    contact Bodil Muller: (503) 547-0161

    • June 05, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 05, 2024
    • (CDT)
    • 5 sessions
    • Denmark

    GRUNDLOVSDAG (CONSTITUTION DAY)

    The throne of Denmark was established in the tenth century and is the oldest in Europe and third oldest in the world. Through to the seventeenth century, the majority of decisions in Danish rule came through the monarchy and each monarch was obliged to sign the Haandfæstning wherein he promised to rule fairly.

    In 1660, Denmark became a constitutional monarchy, effectively removed the monarchy from absolute power and putting decision making into the hands of the leaders of government. From this time, aside from the royal power of the king, three types of powers existed in Denmark: legislative, executive and judicial.

    Including the signing of the first constitution, five constitutions have been written and signed: 1849, 1866, 1915, 1920 and 1953. None of these had amendments but each was superseded by the one following. On 5 June 1915, women received the right to vote.

    Many places hold festivals on Constitution Day and there are often political rallies. Students, graduates, bands and organisations march in parades behind the bright red and white of the Danish flag. The flag also dominates many buildings across the country.

    More Information

    (In Danish)


    • June 06, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 26, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Online Concerts

    JESSICA LYNNE

    Online Concerts on Facebook

    Tour and Tickets

    My story is not ordinary. I feel pretty ordinary, on the inside. But when I tell people where I come from and how I got here, it usually stirs up a gasp or two. My official story simply states that I grew up in Denmark and now live in the Pacific Northwest, but there is much more to it than that. So I decided to tell it. 

    My childhood was spent divided on three different continents. Strangest of all, I was born in South America. Valdivia, Chile to be exact. My parents were missionaries, but soon after my arrival, they decided to move back to the US. I was 6 months old. Needless to say, I don't remember anything from Chile at all. I ended up with dual citizenship - but not a Chilean one, as you might think, but a Danish/American citizenship. 

    My parents met in New York. My mom, from a small town of Sejlflod in Jylland, Denmark. My Dad from the Pacific Northwest. So when they decided, with 6 months old me in their arms to move back to the US, they settled on Tacoma, WA. Kind of fortuitous that my journey should lead me back here - only about 10 blocks away from my first American home. But that's for a later chapter. 

    My parents divorced when I was three and my mother decided to move us, three girls, to Denmark. First Skanderborg, then what I now consider my hometown, Haslev. This is where I went to school, where I had friends, where I learned about life, and love and longing. This is where I grew up. If you can call yourself a "grown-up" at 17; that's when I moved away from home. 
    I then became what I would call a "Copenhagen nomade" moving almost 25 times in the 13 or so years I lived there, interrupted only by a 2-year stint in Barcelona - also a story for another chapter.

    I finally up-rooted, if I ever had roots, and moved to the Pacific Northwest in 2010 when I was 31.

    And that's the short, cliff notes version story. But that's not really how I want to tell it. I want to tell my story by delving into how that story made me, me. What it was like, being a part of two worlds, and what sometimes felt like not being a part of anything at all. Feeling like an outsider for all the wrong reasons, trying so hard to belong, but not feeling like I belonged at all.
    As a child, I would spend the entire year going to school and living my life in Haslev and every other summer I would visit my Dad in Seattle. The alternating summers, he would visit us. I spoke (and still do speak) both languages fluently... mostly without an accent in either language. My dad would call every week long-distance to keep in touch with us girls. And in the '80s that was not cheap! My mom, even though she is 100% Dane, would make traditional Danish cooking right alongside fried chicken and cornbread. I felt the duality every day. 

    Consequently, it somehow made me feel divided. Instead of belonging everywhere, I felt like I didn't belong anywhere. 
    I suppose, with a different outlook on life, this duality could have made me feel abundant, like a citizen of the world, who had many homes. But my upbringing in so many ways nourished lack and dependence. And it made me feel stretched too thin. I was too American to be Danish and too Danish to be American. So I was, effectively, neither.

    Every time I came back to Denmark I would miss the US terribly. But it was never actually true the other way around. This only occurred to me when I finally moved here, that the homesickness I would feel for the US when gone, never set in for Denmark. Yes, I missed my family, but not the culture, not the place itself. 

    In reality, moving to the US clarified a lot of things for me. I have always been more American than Danish, I know that now. I've been loud, brazen, and always had big dreams and big gestures. Not in any way the proper little girl my mother tried to raise me to be. I had a terrible temper, that felt uncontrollable at times and a big voice that was repeatedly told to not shine too brightly, not to make the other kids feel bad. 

    This may seem harsh, but anyone from Denmark would notice this as "Janteloven" or "The Law of Jante" - a culturally-induced oppression that the Danes all know too well. Again, this is a phenomenon I will explain in depth in another chapter. Suffice it to say, it's a classic "crabs in a bucket" syndrome. When one tries to climb out the others will pull it back down.

    So I suppose I was not entirely caught in the middle. I sometimes describe myself as "half-and-half", with a chuckle. But that doesn't really describe me. In reality, I am more like 75/25. In the last ten years, I have learned to embrace my Danish roots, while also fully encompassing how American I really am. Immigrant heritage and all. 

    In truth, it probably doesn't matter what continent we are on. Denmark for me was a time in my life when I tried to hide who I truly was, in order to try and fit in. It was a time of listening to others over my own intuition, my inner voice. It was a time of not being and owning who I truly am and what my life's purpose is. The US for me has been the journey of fully growing into my true self. A journey of growth and self-exploration. Of owning all sides of me, even the ones I don't necessarily like. And most importantly listening to my own truth rather than what others say. It's not about Denmark and it's not about the US. It's about what each country represents to me and who I became during each timeframe I spent there. 

    I can now look at being "half-and-half" and feel grateful that I was blessed with so much diversity. And I can own my big voice and my larger than life attitude and put myself on a stage and feel right at home. But I can also remember where I came from, and what is truly important in life. Love of family, love of friends and most importantly, self-love.
    • June 06, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 26, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Online

    SEATTLE SYMPHONY CONDUCTED BY THOMAS DAUSGAARD

    Online Concerts on Facebook

    Concert Schedule

    The Seattle Symphony Unleashes the Power of Music, Brings People Together, and Lifts the Human Spirit

    The Seattle Symphony is one of America's leading symphony orchestras and is internationally acclaimed for its innovative programming and extensive recording history. Under the leadership of Music Director Thomas Dausgaard, the Symphony is heard from September through July by more than 500,000 people through live performances and radio broadcasts. It performs in one of the finest modern concert halls in the world — the acoustically superb Benaroya Hall — in downtown Seattle.

    Its extensive education and community engagement programs reach over 65,000 children and adults each year. The Seattle Symphony has a deep commitment to new music, commissioning many works by living composers each season.

    The orchestra has made nearly 150 recordings and has received two Grammy Awards, 21 Grammy nominations, two Emmy Awards and numerous other accolades. In 2014 the Symphony launched its in-house recording label, Seattle Symphony Media.

    Thomas Dausgaard Bio


    • June 06, 2020
    • (EDT)
    • July 25, 2020
    • (EDT)
    • 8 sessions
    • Online - Hans Christian Andersen Storytelling Center New York

    HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN STORYTELLING CENTER ONLINE

    SATURDAY MORNING HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN STORYTELLING GOES VIRTUAL

    A SIXTY FOUR YEAR NEW YORK TRADITION PREVAILS

    HCA Storytelling Online 

    Saturday Mornings from 11 am to Noon (Eastern Time)
    Storytellers from throughout the world tell Andersen’s iconic stories
    From Central Park to Your Home anywhere in the world 

    This year the Hans Christian Andersen Story Telling Center, Inc. (“HCASTC”)  is proud to launch a 2020 Live On-line Season starting on May 30th.   World renowned New York storyteller and artistic director of the HCASTC, Laura Simms,  has curated a season of stories told by the  best  storytellers from across the globe.  Different Andersen stories will be told every week. 

    Click Here for the Complete Schedule

    Hans Christian Andersen’s stories are the  most translated literature next to the Bible.   His stories, penned in the nineteenth Century, have been delighting audiences worldwide since. They  were created as commentaries for social injustice and inequality.  They remain  contemporary  and thrill children and adults alike with their array of fabulous characters including the Ugly Duckling who overcomes bullying and the Emperor Without Clothes whose vanity and idiocy is exposed by a child.  Kindness, humor, and the power of imagination and truth prevails. 

    If you are looking for something wonderful and valuable to share with your family in these times, join us for live performances on Saturdays at 11 a.m. straight to your kitchen or living room or garden. Recorded The link for our live performance will be on our website shortly. performances will subsequently be made available on our YouTube channel and on Facebook. Our website will also have those links. The program will continue through the end of September. If social distancing rules permit, live performances may be resumed in Central Park later during the season. Stories have always been the most brilliant and engaging way to start a great conversation.   Let the tale of the Nightingale about authenticity and real communication lift your spirits.  The poignant  tales of The Last Pearl and The Little Match Girl soothe your heart. And laugh out loud with the tales of Jack, The Dullard and the Swineherd. We will have mornings of Andersen’s longer irresistible tales of the Snow Queen (the real story behind Frozen), The Wild Swans, or The Little Mermaid. 

    Storytelling is entertaining. It is also life confirming. It keeps imagination and faith alive.  Technology has helped us immensely through this time, but put away the laptop when the story is over and talk together about the stories.  Tell your own. And keep up a tradition that has been ongoing for 64 years.  

    There is a restorative power in storytelling. The most experienced and wonderful storytellers will support a sense of inner safety while exploring profound resolutions to emotional experiences. Research has shown that listening to stories helps increase empathy and navigate challenging times. AND it improves the ability to  feel closer to one another by building connection among  people.  Let’s strengthen our sense of being one global  community. 

    What better time in which to shrink  physical distances and join us mind to mind across the world.

    HCASTC has been freely delivering stories to New Yorkers of all ages since 1956, rain or shine from its signature location at the Statue of Hans Christian Andersen in Central Park (72nd Street and 5th Avenue). We bring stories, and the Park  into your home. 

    HCASTC is a nonprofit organization that, aside from its historical site, has been bringing storytelling projects in schools, and is partnering with the Andersen Museum in Odense, Denmark, hometown of the author, HCASTC is supported by private donors, contributions from listeners,  and the Parks Department of New York City. For the last 64 years it has been proudly offering spoken word performances that gathered thousands of families throughout the summer months. This is still today kept as a gift: an open invitation for us all to meet in the spirit of Andersen’s love for justice, children and literature.

    For detailed information, please visit our website at http://www.hcastorycenter.org

     

    • June 07, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 07, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • 2 sessions

    A ROYAL BIRTHDAY - PRINCE JOACHIM

    HRH Prince Joachim
    Photo by 
    Kamilla Bryndum

    Joachim Holger Waldemar Christian, Prince of Denmark, Count of Monpezat, was born on 7 June 1969. His Royal Highness Prince Joachim is the son of HM Queen Margrethe II and Prince Henrik of Denmark (d. 2018). He is included in the order of succession to the Throne and may act as Regent when HM The Queen and HRH Crown Prince Frederik are abroad

    Marital status

    On 24 May 2008, HRH Prince Joachim married Miss Marie Agathe Odile Cavallier, whoin connection with the marriage became HRH Princess Marie of Denmark, Countess of Monpezat.

    Children
    Family Photo by Steen Brogaard

    HH Prince Nikolai William Alexander Frederik, born on 28 August 1999, HH Prince Felix Henrik Valdemar Christian, born on 22 July 2002, HH Prince Henrik Carl Joachim Alain, born on 4 May 2009, and HH Princess Athena Marguerite Françoise Marie born on 24 January 2012. 

    Prince Joachim shares custody of Prince Felix with Prince Felix' mother, Alexandra Christina, Countess of Frederiksborg, who was formerly married to Prince Joachim.

    Christening and confirmation

    Prince Joachim was christened in the Århus Cathedral on 15 July 1969 and confirmed in the Chapel of Fredensborg Castle on 10 June 1982.

    More Information:

    Royal House Website


    • June 08, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 15, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Northwest Danish Association - Seattle and Portland

    NORTHWEST DANISH ASSOCIATION

    Office Closure due to COVID-19

    The NWDA office and the Seattle Danish Center are closed until further notice. To get into contact with us, please e-mail Edith Christensen at seattle@nwdanish.org or Line Larsen at line@nwdanish.org

    NWDA events have been cancelled or moved online.

    We hope to see you all soon once it is again safe to do so.

    NWDA Website

    NWDA Facebook

    • June 08, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 15, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Danish Sisterhood of America

    DANISH SISTERHOOD OF AMERICA URGES LOCAL LODGES TO SUSPEND MEETINGS

    March 15, 2020
    Dear members, friends and lodge leaders of the Danish Sisterhood of America, 

    In this time of global concern about the spread of COVID-19 and based on recommendations and information from the CDC (The Center for Disease Control and Prevention), state and local agencies, the Danish Sisterhood’s main focus is to protect our members and limit the spread of COVID-19. It is critical that we protect the health and well-being of our communities and work to not overwhelm our health care system.  

    Local lodges are urged to suspend gatherings and events until further notice, and to take care of one another. In the event your district convention is cancelled and your lodge will incur a cancellation fee, please contact a member of the National Board.

    The Supreme Lodge recognizes that many of our members fall within the high risk category established by the CDC.  The entire board urges you to take the necessary precautions and stay safe and healthy.

    With warm regards, venlige hilsner, and in sisterly spirit,

    Christina Sallee, National President

    ~~~~~~~~~~

    Follow us on Facebook to keep up to date on news and events within the Danish Sisterhood.

    Danish Sisterhood Website


    • June 09, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • September 15, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • American-Scandinavian Foundation - New York, NY

    ASF TRANSLATION AWARDS

    Application Deadline: Extended - September 15, 2020

    The American-Scandinavian Foundation annually awards three translation prizes for outstanding translations of poetry, fiction, drama, or literary prose written by a Scandinavian author born after 1900.

    Submission Information
    Entry deadline:
    September 15

    The Nadia Christensen Prize includes a $2,500 award, publication of an excerpt in Scandinavian Review, and a commemorative bronze medallion.

    The Leif and Inger Sjöberg Award, given to an individual whose literature translations from a Nordic language have not previously been published, includes a $2,000 award, publication of an excerpt in Scandinavian Review, and a commemorative bronze medallion.

    The Wigeland Prize, given to the best translation by a Norwegian, includes a $2,000 award, publication of an excerpt in Scandinavian Review, and a commemorative bronze medallion.

    —Apply Now!

    Rules

    1. The prizes are for outstanding English translations of poetry, fiction, drama or literary prose originally written in a Nordic language.
    2. If prose, manuscripts must be no longer than 50 pages; if poetry, 25 (Do not exceed these limits). Manuscripts must be typed and double-spaced with numbered pages.
    3. Translations must be from the writing of one author, although not necessarily from a single work. Please include a one-paragraph description about the author.
    4. An entry must consist of:
      • One copy of the translation, including a title page and a table of contents for the proposed book of which the manuscript submitted is a part. 
      • One copy of the work(s) in the original language; please send the relevant pages.
      • A CV containing all contact information, including email address, for the translator; and
      • A letter or other document signed by the author, the author’s agent or the author’s estate granting permission for the translation to be entered in this competition and published in Scandinavian Review.
    1. Translator’s names may not appear on any page of their manuscripts, including the title page.
    2. The translation submitted in the competition may not have been previously published in the English language by the submission deadline.
      (If the translation being submitted to this competition is also under consideration by a publisher, you must inform us of the expected publication date.)
    3. Translators may submit one entry only and may not submit the same entry in more than two competitions.
    4. The Translation Prize cannot be won more than three times by the same translator.
    Previous ASF Translation Prize Opening and Winners.pdf

    INFO@AMSCAN.ORG
    SCANDINAVIAHOUSE.ORG
    AMSCAN.ORG

    • June 11, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • June 25, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • Danebo - Portland, OR

    ONLINE DANISH CLASSES

    Learn Danish in an informal and cozy setting. Aase W. Beaulieu is the instructor for the program in Portland. Spring Term 2020 will be taught online via Zoom. 

    Three levels are offered: 
    Beginning/Level 1 has no prerequisite 
    Intermediate/Level 2 requires Level 1 or instructor permission
    Advanced/Level 3 requires completion of Level 2 or instructor permission

    Cost:
    $160 for NWDA members
    $200 for non-members

    Become a member of NWDA for the lowest price!

    Level 1: 

    Spring Term 2020: April 30th to June 25th
    Thursday evenings 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm

    Level 2: 

    Spring Term 2020: April 28th to June 23rd
    Tuesday evenings 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm

    Level 3:

    Spring Term 2020: April 28th to June 23rd
    Tuesday evenings 7:35 pm to 9:05 pm

    Registrations:

    To register for Danish classes in Portland: E-mail or call instructor Aase Beaulieu at aasewbeaulieu@yahoo.com or (503) 320-1041

    About Aase Beaulieu:

    Danish instructor, Aase Beaulieu, has four years of teaching experience at UC Berkeley. She also has two years of experience at Berlitz International School of Languages, both group and individual lessons. Aase has been a private tutor of Danish since 2015.

    Danebo
    Kristin Square II
    9498 SW Barbur, Suite 207
    Portland, OR 97219

    Telephone - 503.547.0161
    Emailaasewbeaulieu@yahoo.com
    NWDA Website

    NWDA Facebook

    • June 11, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 11, 2024
    • (CDT)
    • 5 sessions
    • Denmark

    A ROYAL BIRTHDAY -
    HRH PRINCE HENRIK (1934-2018)

    Prince Henrik was born on 11 June 1934 in Talence, Gironde, France. He was the son of Count André de Laborde de Monpezat (d. 1998) and Countess Renée de Monpezat, née Doursennot (d. 2002). Prince Henrik passed away on 13 February 2018.
    Photo: Torben Eskerod

    Wedding

    On 10 June 1967, the Heir Apparent to the Danish throne, Princess Margrethe, married Henri Marie Jean André Count de Laborde de Monpezat, who in connection with the marriage became HRH Prince Henrik of Denmark. The wedding ceremony took place in Holmens Kirke (the naval church) and the wedding festivities were held at Fredensborg Palace.

    Children

    HRH Crown Prince Frederik André Henrik Christian, born on 26 May 1968 HRH Prince Joachim Holger Waldemar Christian, born on 7 June 1969.

    Educational background

    HRH Prince Henrik spent his first five years in Vietnam, then known as French Indo-China,where his father was in charge of family interests in industrial enterprises, etc. founded by his grandfather at the turn of the century. In 1939, the family returned to the family residence, le Cayrou, in Cahors. Having received instruction at home until 1947, Prince Henrik subsequently studied at the Jesuit boarding school in Bordeaux. In the period 1948-1950, HRH Prince Henrik attended upper secondary school in Cahors. His Royal Highness returned to Hanoi in 1950 and graduated from the French upper secondary school in Hanoi in 1952. In the period 1952- 1957, Prince Henrik studied law and political science at the Sorbonne, Paris, while simultaneously studying Chinese and Vietnamese at École Nationale des Langues Orientales. Having studied Oriental languages in Hong Kong in 1957, Prince Henrik subsequently studied in Saigon in 1958.

    Relations to the Defence

    HRH Prince Henrik performed his military service with the infantry in Algeria in the period 1959-1962. His Royal Highness held the honorary rank of General and Admiral in the Danish Defence.

    Business background

    Prince Henrik had a background in the diplomatic service. In 1962, His Royal Highness worked within the Asia Department of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and from 1963 to 1967, he  was a Secretary to the French Embassy in London. 

    Language

    The mother tongue of HRH Prince Henrik is French, but he quickly learned Danish after moving to Denmark. In addition, His Royal Highness spoke English, Chinese and Vietnamese.

    More information:

    Royal House Website

    Royal House Facebook

    • June 11, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 11, 2024
    • (CDT)
    • 5 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - PETER OLSEN HANSEN

    Peter Olsen Hansen (11 June 1818 – 9 August 1895) was the translator of the Book of Mormon into Danish.  Throughout Danish American history,  the State of Utah has had one of the highest concentrations of Danes and those of Danish ancestry.  That is directly due to the work of early Mormon missionaries like Peter Olsen Hansen and his contemporaries.

    Hansen was born in CopenhagenDenmark.  A sailor by trade, he joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Boston in 1844. After this, Hansen moved to Nauvoo, Illinois. While at Nauvoo. Hansen assisted in building the Nauvoo Temple and, at the request of Brigham Young, worked on the translation of the Book of Mormon into Danish.  Hansen was a Mormon pioneer and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in September 1847.











    Hansen accompanied Erastus Snow on the first Latter-day Saint mission to Denmark.  He served on this mission from 1849 to 1855, during which he served as the first editor of the Skandinaviens Stjerne. Hansen later served additional missions in Denmark from 1873 to 1875 and from 1880 to 1882.

    The Mormon missionaries arrived at an opportune time for the propagation of their faith.  The new Danish constitution written in 1849 granted religious liberty and the missionaries to Denmark did not experience the restraints by the state encountered by the missionaries in Norway and Sweden.  Religious life in Denmark also was undergoing upheaval, and people were questioning the ineffective Lutheran Church.  Baptists, Methodists, and religious dissenters appeared on the scene and sowed the seeds of religious debate.  The Mormons, therefore, were protected against government intervention and found an audience attuned to new religious approaches.

    Even though the constitution of Denmark guaranteed religious freedom there were no laws supporting that right.  As a result some religious and political leaders attempted to place restrictions on the Mormons, but they were unsuccessful.  The Mormons also suffered harassment from the populace.  At Aalborg, for example, a crowd of more than 1,000 who had come to witness a Mormon Baptism by immersion in the Limfjord, was antagonized by the Mormon speaker when he told them that their church and clergy were of the devil.  The crowd stoned the Mormons and broke windows in Mormon homes.  More personal violence and property damage took place in small towns, where converts were more easily identified, than in large cities.  In the cities hostility was directed to the religious services by unruly elements who disturbed the services and interfered with the speaker.  But the government would not prohibit the assembly of the Mormons, and after ten years, after the Mormons became more commonplace, harassment declined.  The actual loss in converts is hard to estimate, but as in most other instances, the victims probably gained from the publicity and the attention.   (From: The Danish Americans by George R. Nielsen)

    Hansen died in 1895 at Manti, Utah Territory.

    • June 13, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • June 12, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • 2 sessions
    • Oaks Amusement Park, Portland, OR

    MIDSUMMER FESTIVAL

    2020 Midsummer Festival is Canceled

    2021 Festival scheduled for June 12

    In the Northern lands of the midnight sun, it's tradition to celebrate the sun and the fire element during the summer solstice. We at Nordic Northwest honor this tradition by celebrating with Midsummer Festival.

    Join your friends and family in SE Portland to ring in the 92nd year of this historic, regional tradition that occurs each June. We are an inclusive community, welcoming of all. Midsummer continues to be a fun, family friendly and important day with centuries-old traditions and everyone is invited!

    Enjoy delicious Nordic cuisine, try traditional beverages and scrumptious sweets. Spend the day with us and make your own colorful flower crown and other crafts. Play "Viking Chess", Nordic Jenga and other fun games. Take a break in the beer garden before we all come together and dance around the Maypole and sign Nordic folk songs. With two stages of entertainment which includes live music and traditional dancing, you are sure to have a memorable day.

    Make sure to take home some souvenirs from one of the many Nordic makers and artists who will have their booths open all day for you to browse and shop. 

    Oaks Amusement Park
    7805 SE Oaks Park Way
    Portland, OR

    Telephone - (503) 977-0275
    Nordic Northwest Website

    Nordic Northwest Facebook


    • June 14, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 14, 2024
    • (CDT)
    • 5 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - STENY HOYER

    Steny Hamilton Hoyer (born June 14, 1939) is an American attorney and politician serving as U.S. Representative for Maryland's 5th congressional district since 1981 and as House Majority Leader since 2019. A Democrat, he was first elected in a special election on May 19, 1981, and is currently serving in his 20th term. The district includes a large swath of rural and suburban territory southeast of Washington, D.C. Hoyer is the dean of the Maryland Congressional delegation and the most senior Democrat in the House.

    Since 2003, Hoyer has been the second ranking Democrat in the House of Representatives behind Nancy Pelosi. He is a two-time House Majority Leader, having previously served in the post from 2007 to 2011 under Speaker Pelosi. During two periods of Republican House control (2003–2007 and 2011–2019), Hoyer served as House Minority Whip, both times under Minority Leader Pelosi. As a result of the 2018 midterm elections, in which the Democrats took control of the House, Hoyer was re-elected Majority Leader in January 2019 on the opening of the 116th Congress, remaining the number two House Democrat behind Speaker Pelosi.

    Hoyer was born in New York City, New York, and grew up in Mitchellville, Maryland, the son of Jean (née Baldwin) and Steen Theilgaard Høyer. His father was Danish and a native of Copenhagen; "Steny" is a variant of his father's name, "Steen". His mother was an American, with Scottish, German, and English ancestry, and a descendant of John Hart, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. He graduated from Suitland High School in Suitland, Maryland.

    In his early years at the University of Maryland College Park, Congressman Hoyer held a 1.9 grade point average. His attitude towards school and politics changed after hearing a speech from John F. Kennedy prior to his election in 1960. In 1963, he received his B.A. degree magna cum laude from the University of Maryland, College Park, where he also became a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity. He earned his J.D. degree from Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C., in 1966.

    Hoyer has three daughters, Anne, Susan, and Stefany, from his marriage to Judy Pickett Hoyer, who died of cancer in February 1997. In 2012, after Hoyer announced his support of same-sex marriage, his daughter Stefany Hoyer Hemmer came out as a lesbian in an interview with the Washington Blade.

    His wife was an advocate of early childhood education, and child development learning centers in Maryland have been named in her honor ("Judy Centers").  She also suffered from epilepsy, and the Epilepsy Foundation of America sponsors an annual public lecture in her name.  Hoyer, too, has been an advocate for research in this area, and the Epilepsy Foundation presented him in 2002 with their Congressional Leadership Award.

    Hoyer serves on the Board of Trustees for St. Mary's College of Maryland and is a member of the board of the International Foundation for Electoral Systems, a nonprofit that supports international elections. He is also an Advisory Board Member for the Center for the Study of Democracy.

    • June 16, 2020
    • (CDT)

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - MAX HENIUS

    Max Henius (June 16, 1859 – November 15, 1935) was a Danish-American biochemist who specialized in the fermentation processes. Max Henius co-founded the American Academy of Brewing in Chicago.

    Max Henius was born in Aalborg, Denmark. His parents were Polish Jewish immigrants Emilie (née Wasserzug) and Isidor Henius. His father emigrated from Poland in 1837,  and founded De Danske Spritfabrikker, a Danish Distillery which is now part of V&S Group.  Isidor also built a small castle in Aalborg, now called Sohngaardsholm Slot, since 2005 a gourmet restaurant. Max Henius emigrated to the United States in 1881 at the age of 22 from Aalborg, settling in Chicago.

    In Chicago, he married Danish-born Johanne Louise Heiberg, who was the sister of historian Johan Ludvig Heiberg and related to Danish author Peter Andreas Heiberg.  His great-grandchildren are actors Keith CarradineRobert Carradine, Christopher Carradine, and Michael Bowen.

    Together with Robert Wahl, Henius founded an institute for chemical and mechanical analysis. Founded in 1891, the Chicago-based American Brewing Academy (later known as the Wahl-Henius Institute of Fermentology) was one of the premier brewing schools of the pre-prohibition era. This institute was later expanded with a brew master school.

    At the turn of the century Max Henius began to be interested in Danish-American organizations in Chicago. Funds were being raised by Danish Americans to purchase 200 acres (0.81 km2) of heather-covered hills, located in part of Rold Forest (Danish: Rold Skov), Denmark's largest forest. In 1912 Max Henius presented the deed to H.M. King Christian X as a permanent memorial from Danish Americans. Rebild National Park (Danish:Rebild Bakker) is today a Danish national park situated near the town of Skørping in Rebild municipalityRegion Nordjylland in northern JutlandDenmark. Every July 4 since 1912, except for the two world wars, large crowds have gathered in the heather-covered hills of Rebild to celebrate American Independence Day. On the slope north of Rebild, where the residence of Max Henius was once located, a bust is placed in his memory.
    Compiled by World Heritage Encyclopedia™


    • June 18, 2020
    • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM (PDT)
    • Nordic Northwest - Portland, OR

    VIRTUAL EVENT - NORDIC BUSINESS COUNCIL MEETUP WITH NORLYS OF SILKEBORG, DENMARK

    RSVP FOR THE EVENT HERE.  

    Please join us for the next Nordic Northwest Business Council Meetup to learn about business topics that have a connection to Nordic countries. Free and open to the public. 

    Our speaker will be Morten Bilgrav Mathiesen who is Senior Vice President of IT and Innovation at the Norlys company in Denmark. He will be joining us via Zoom on June 18th from 8:00-9:00 AM pacific timezone. The presentation will be in English. 

    Norlys brings Denmark together with green and digital services in the fields of energy, internet and television. They connect people with people, and people with the world. They are driving towards a a green and digitized Denmark. 

    Norlys has 709,000 shareholders, approx. 1.5 million customer relationships and 2,500 employees making it Denmark's largest energy and telecommunications group. It is headquartered in Silkeborg (Jylland) and has locations in Aarhus, Aalborg, Esbjerg and Copenhagen. Morten will discuss Norlys as a company, his role as SVP of IT and Innovation, and some of the key initiatives they are involved with. Following the presentation we will have a Question and Answer session. 

    Tell your friends and join us. All are welcome. 

    Please RSVP as soon as possible since space is limited.

    Nordic Northwest Website

    • June 19, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 21, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Menucha Retreat & Conference Center - Corbett, OR

    DANISH AMERICAN CULTURAL RETREAT

    2020 Retreat is Canceled

    Be sure to reserve June 19 to 21 for the Danish American Cultural Retreat also held at the Menucha Retreat Center in Corbett, Oregon. Interesting programs about Denmark, topics revolving around history and modern times, and book re views have all been on the agenda. We reserve the amount of space we need well in advance so be sure to watch for registration dates. Both Himmelbjerget and DACR are held near Corbett, Oregon at the beautiful Menucha Retreat and Conference Center. 

    Menucha Retreat and Conference Center
    38711 E Historic Columbia River Hwy
    Corbett, OR  97019

    Telephone (NWDA) - 206-523-3263
    seattle@nwdanish.org
    www.nwdanish.org

    • June 23, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • June 23, 2024
    • (CDT)
    • 5 sessions

    Sankt Hans Aften (Midsummer)

    A Nordic tradition, celebrated on the night before the Midsummer's Day

    Midsummer's Eve or Sankt Hans Aften is a relic of pagan customs, where the shortest day, the winter solstice, and the longest day, the summer solstice, were celebrated. Originally it was believed that midsummer night was filled with magical forces of nature—both bad and good. All herbs and sources were particularly sacred, and it was a tradition to seek sacred springs or picking healing herbs on this night.

    The tradition of burning bonfires came later. Originally they were not associated with Midsummer's Eve celebration, although later some farmers who believed in witches started burning bonfires on this night. A shape that looks like a witch was put in the fire. The purpose of the fire was to scare the witches and evil spirits away, rather than burning them.

    Today the Midsummer's Eve is still celebrated with bonfires, dancing, singing and a traditional speech from someone well known in the community. The celebrations are held all around the country, both in cities and small towns.

    Some of the most vibrant celebrations take place in Copenhagen, Odense, Aarhus, and Skagen. The capital has bonfires at several places, including Tivoli Gardens, Frederiksberg Gardens, Islands Brygge, and more. Likewise, Aarhus offers quite a few locations to celebrate, such as Aarhus University campus, Godsbanen, or Langenæs Church. In Odense, the festivities take place at Engen in the Fruens Bøge forest. At last, the remote Skagen promises an exceptional celebration. Thousands come to the northern tip of Denmark to enjoy traditional songs at the bonfire that lasts here longer than anywhere else in the country.



    • July 03, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • July 03, 2022
    • (CDT)
    • 3 sessions
    • Rebild National Park near Aalborg, Denmark

    REBILD FESTIVAL IN DENMARK

    April 8, 2020
    THERE WILL BE NO REBILD FESTIVAL THIS SUMMER

    Rebild National Park Society, the Danish-American Friendship Organization founded in 1912, has been closely following the coronavirus developments in Denmark, and it is with great regret that on April 6, together with the rest of Denmark, we received Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen's announcement that all of the big summer events and festivals in Denmark have been cancelled or prohibited through the end of August. Of course, we take note of the authorities' announcement, and the Rebild Festival on July 4, 2020 has therefore been cancelled. This also applies to all other planned events in this regard from July 2 – 5, 2020.

    We are very sorry. We had looked forward to the celebration of the 4th of July in the Rebild Hills in Denmark, and the planning was in full swing. The Rebild Festival is a historic and important tradition; a special celebration of the close bonds that exist between Denmark and the United States.

    Despite the cancellation, we are looking ahead, and the focus will now be on the Rebild Festival in 2021 and on developing and strengthening Rebild National Park Society so that we may stand even stronger together.

    The U.S. Rebild Annual Membership Meeting, including pre-tours and post-tours, which originally had been planned for Arizona in 2020, had already been rescheduled for next year – March 2021 – in Tempe, Arizona.

    Thank you for your continued support and dedication to the Rebild Festival and Rebild National Park Society, we need it!

    For updates and to support Rebild National Park Society, please visit www.rebildfesten.dk and www.danishrebildsociety.com.

    Jørgen Bech Madsen, President
    Lars Bisgaard, Secretary General

    Celebration of Danish American Friendship - The annual Rebild Festival at the Rebild National Park near Aalborg, Denmark

    Official Events Schedule to be Announced

    July 3 - Rebild Park events and Gala in Aalborg

    July 4 - Tent Luncheon and Festival in the Rebild Hills

    July 5 - General Membership Meeting

    http://www.danishrebildsociety.com

    https://www.rebildfesten.dk



    • July 14, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Sunrise Village - Puyallup, WA

    JESSICA LYNNE

    Tour and Tickets

    My story is not ordinary. I feel pretty ordinary, on the inside. But when I tell people where I come from and how I got here, it usually stirs up a gasp or two. My official story simply states that I grew up in Denmark and now live in the Pacific Northwest, but there is much more to it than that. So I decided to tell it. 

    My childhood was spent divided on three different continents. Strangest of all, I was born in South America. Valdivia, Chile to be exact. My parents were missionaries, but soon after my arrival, they decided to move back to the US. I was 6 months old. Needless to say, I don't remember anything from Chile at all. I ended up with dual citizenship - but not a Chilean one, as you might think, but a Danish/American citizenship. 

    My parents met in New York. My mom, from a small town of Sejlflod in Jylland, Denmark. My Dad from the Pacific Northwest. So when they decided, with 6 months old me in their arms to move back to the US, they settled on Tacoma, WA. Kind of fortuitous that my journey should lead me back here - only about 10 blocks away from my first American home. But that's for a later chapter. 

    My parents divorced when I was three and my mother decided to move us, three girls, to Denmark. First Skanderborg, then what I now consider my hometown, Haslev. This is where I went to school, where I had friends, where I learned about life, and love and longing. This is where I grew up. If you can call yourself a "grown-up" at 17; that's when I moved away from home. 
    I then became what I would call a "Copenhagen nomade" moving almost 25 times in the 13 or so years I lived there, interrupted only by a 2-year stint in Barcelona - also a story for another chapter.

    I finally up-rooted, if I ever had roots, and moved to the Pacific Northwest in 2010 when I was 31.

    And that's the short, cliff notes version story. But that's not really how I want to tell it. I want to tell my story by delving into how that story made me, me. What it was like, being a part of two worlds, and what sometimes felt like not being a part of anything at all. Feeling like an outsider for all the wrong reasons, trying so hard to belong, but not feeling like I belonged at all.
    As a child, I would spend the entire year going to school and living my life in Haslev and every other summer I would visit my Dad in Seattle. The alternating summers, he would visit us. I spoke (and still do speak) both languages fluently... mostly without an accent in either language. My dad would call every week long-distance to keep in touch with us girls. And in the '80s that was not cheap! My mom, even though she is 100% Dane, would make traditional Danish cooking right alongside fried chicken and cornbread. I felt the duality every day. 

    Consequently, it somehow made me feel divided. Instead of belonging everywhere, I felt like I didn't belong anywhere. 
    I suppose, with a different outlook on life, this duality could have made me feel abundant, like a citizen of the world, who had many homes. But my upbringing in so many ways nourished lack and dependence. And it made me feel stretched too thin. I was too American to be Danish and too Danish to be American. So I was, effectively, neither.

    Every time I came back to Denmark I would miss the US terribly. But it was never actually true the other way around. This only occurred to me when I finally moved here, that the homesickness I would feel for the US when gone, never set in for Denmark. Yes, I missed my family, but not the culture, not the place itself. 

    In reality, moving to the US clarified a lot of things for me. I have always been more American than Danish, I know that now. I've been loud, brazen, and always had big dreams and big gestures. Not in any way the proper little girl my mother tried to raise me to be. I had a terrible temper, that felt uncontrollable at times and a big voice that was repeatedly told to not shine too brightly, not to make the other kids feel bad. 

    This may seem harsh, but anyone from Denmark would notice this as "Janteloven" or "The Law of Jante" - a culturally-induced oppression that the Danes all know too well. Again, this is a phenomenon I will explain in depth in another chapter. Suffice it to say, it's a classic "crabs in a bucket" syndrome. When one tries to climb out the others will pull it back down.

    So I suppose I was not entirely caught in the middle. I sometimes describe myself as "half-and-half", with a chuckle. But that doesn't really describe me. In reality, I am more like 75/25. In the last ten years, I have learned to embrace my Danish roots, while also fully encompassing how American I really am. Immigrant heritage and all. 

    In truth, it probably doesn't matter what continent we are on. Denmark for me was a time in my life when I tried to hide who I truly was, in order to try and fit in. It was a time of listening to others over my own intuition, my inner voice. It was a time of not being and owning who I truly am and what my life's purpose is. The US for me has been the journey of fully growing into my true self. A journey of growth and self-exploration. Of owning all sides of me, even the ones I don't necessarily like. And most importantly listening to my own truth rather than what others say. It's not about Denmark and it's not about the US. It's about what each country represents to me and who I became during each timeframe I spent there. 

    I can now look at being "half-and-half" and feel grateful that I was blessed with so much diversity. And I can own my big voice and my larger than life attitude and put myself on a stage and feel right at home. But I can also remember where I came from, and what is truly important in life. Love of family, love of friends and most importantly, self-love.
    • July 15, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Kent Station Concerts - Kent, WA

    JESSICA LYNNE

    Tour and Tickets

    My story is not ordinary. I feel pretty ordinary, on the inside. But when I tell people where I come from and how I got here, it usually stirs up a gasp or two. My official story simply states that I grew up in Denmark and now live in the Pacific Northwest, but there is much more to it than that. So I decided to tell it. 

    My childhood was spent divided on three different continents. Strangest of all, I was born in South America. Valdivia, Chile to be exact. My parents were missionaries, but soon after my arrival, they decided to move back to the US. I was 6 months old. Needless to say, I don't remember anything from Chile at all. I ended up with dual citizenship - but not a Chilean one, as you might think, but a Danish/American citizenship. 

    My parents met in New York. My mom, from a small town of Sejlflod in Jylland, Denmark. My Dad from the Pacific Northwest. So when they decided, with 6 months old me in their arms to move back to the US, they settled on Tacoma, WA. Kind of fortuitous that my journey should lead me back here - only about 10 blocks away from my first American home. But that's for a later chapter. 

    My parents divorced when I was three and my mother decided to move us, three girls, to Denmark. First Skanderborg, then what I now consider my hometown, Haslev. This is where I went to school, where I had friends, where I learned about life, and love and longing. This is where I grew up. If you can call yourself a "grown-up" at 17; that's when I moved away from home. 
    I then became what I would call a "Copenhagen nomade" moving almost 25 times in the 13 or so years I lived there, interrupted only by a 2-year stint in Barcelona - also a story for another chapter.

    I finally up-rooted, if I ever had roots, and moved to the Pacific Northwest in 2010 when I was 31.

    And that's the short, cliff notes version story. But that's not really how I want to tell it. I want to tell my story by delving into how that story made me, me. What it was like, being a part of two worlds, and what sometimes felt like not being a part of anything at all. Feeling like an outsider for all the wrong reasons, trying so hard to belong, but not feeling like I belonged at all.
    As a child, I would spend the entire year going to school and living my life in Haslev and every other summer I would visit my Dad in Seattle. The alternating summers, he would visit us. I spoke (and still do speak) both languages fluently... mostly without an accent in either language. My dad would call every week long-distance to keep in touch with us girls. And in the '80s that was not cheap! My mom, even though she is 100% Dane, would make traditional Danish cooking right alongside fried chicken and cornbread. I felt the duality every day. 

    Consequently, it somehow made me feel divided. Instead of belonging everywhere, I felt like I didn't belong anywhere. 
    I suppose, with a different outlook on life, this duality could have made me feel abundant, like a citizen of the world, who had many homes. But my upbringing in so many ways nourished lack and dependence. And it made me feel stretched too thin. I was too American to be Danish and too Danish to be American. So I was, effectively, neither.

    Every time I came back to Denmark I would miss the US terribly. But it was never actually true the other way around. This only occurred to me when I finally moved here, that the homesickness I would feel for the US when gone, never set in for Denmark. Yes, I missed my family, but not the culture, not the place itself. 

    In reality, moving to the US clarified a lot of things for me. I have always been more American than Danish, I know that now. I've been loud, brazen, and always had big dreams and big gestures. Not in any way the proper little girl my mother tried to raise me to be. I had a terrible temper, that felt uncontrollable at times and a big voice that was repeatedly told to not shine too brightly, not to make the other kids feel bad. 

    This may seem harsh, but anyone from Denmark would notice this as "Janteloven" or "The Law of Jante" - a culturally-induced oppression that the Danes all know too well. Again, this is a phenomenon I will explain in depth in another chapter. Suffice it to say, it's a classic "crabs in a bucket" syndrome. When one tries to climb out the others will pull it back down.

    So I suppose I was not entirely caught in the middle. I sometimes describe myself as "half-and-half", with a chuckle. But that doesn't really describe me. In reality, I am more like 75/25. In the last ten years, I have learned to embrace my Danish roots, while also fully encompassing how American I really am. Immigrant heritage and all. 

    In truth, it probably doesn't matter what continent we are on. Denmark for me was a time in my life when I tried to hide who I truly was, in order to try and fit in. It was a time of listening to others over my own intuition, my inner voice. It was a time of not being and owning who I truly am and what my life's purpose is. The US for me has been the journey of fully growing into my true self. A journey of growth and self-exploration. Of owning all sides of me, even the ones I don't necessarily like. And most importantly listening to my own truth rather than what others say. It's not about Denmark and it's not about the US. It's about what each country represents to me and who I became during each timeframe I spent there. 

    I can now look at being "half-and-half" and feel grateful that I was blessed with so much diversity. And I can own my big voice and my larger than life attitude and put myself on a stage and feel right at home. But I can also remember where I came from, and what is truly important in life. Love of family, love of friends and most importantly, self-love.
    • July 23, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Concerts in the Park - Cody, WY

    JESSICA LYNNE

    Tour and Tickets

    My story is not ordinary. I feel pretty ordinary, on the inside. But when I tell people where I come from and how I got here, it usually stirs up a gasp or two. My official story simply states that I grew up in Denmark and now live in the Pacific Northwest, but there is much more to it than that. So I decided to tell it. 

    My childhood was spent divided on three different continents. Strangest of all, I was born in South America. Valdivia, Chile to be exact. My parents were missionaries, but soon after my arrival, they decided to move back to the US. I was 6 months old. Needless to say, I don't remember anything from Chile at all. I ended up with dual citizenship - but not a Chilean one, as you might think, but a Danish/American citizenship. 

    My parents met in New York. My mom, from a small town of Sejlflod in Jylland, Denmark. My Dad from the Pacific Northwest. So when they decided, with 6 months old me in their arms to move back to the US, they settled on Tacoma, WA. Kind of fortuitous that my journey should lead me back here - only about 10 blocks away from my first American home. But that's for a later chapter. 

    My parents divorced when I was three and my mother decided to move us, three girls, to Denmark. First Skanderborg, then what I now consider my hometown, Haslev. This is where I went to school, where I had friends, where I learned about life, and love and longing. This is where I grew up. If you can call yourself a "grown-up" at 17; that's when I moved away from home. 
    I then became what I would call a "Copenhagen nomade" moving almost 25 times in the 13 or so years I lived there, interrupted only by a 2-year stint in Barcelona - also a story for another chapter.

    I finally up-rooted, if I ever had roots, and moved to the Pacific Northwest in 2010 when I was 31.

    And that's the short, cliff notes version story. But that's not really how I want to tell it. I want to tell my story by delving into how that story made me, me. What it was like, being a part of two worlds, and what sometimes felt like not being a part of anything at all. Feeling like an outsider for all the wrong reasons, trying so hard to belong, but not feeling like I belonged at all.
    As a child, I would spend the entire year going to school and living my life in Haslev and every other summer I would visit my Dad in Seattle. The alternating summers, he would visit us. I spoke (and still do speak) both languages fluently... mostly without an accent in either language. My dad would call every week long-distance to keep in touch with us girls. And in the '80s that was not cheap! My mom, even though she is 100% Dane, would make traditional Danish cooking right alongside fried chicken and cornbread. I felt the duality every day. 

    Consequently, it somehow made me feel divided. Instead of belonging everywhere, I felt like I didn't belong anywhere. 
    I suppose, with a different outlook on life, this duality could have made me feel abundant, like a citizen of the world, who had many homes. But my upbringing in so many ways nourished lack and dependence. And it made me feel stretched too thin. I was too American to be Danish and too Danish to be American. So I was, effectively, neither.

    Every time I came back to Denmark I would miss the US terribly. But it was never actually true the other way around. This only occurred to me when I finally moved here, that the homesickness I would feel for the US when gone, never set in for Denmark. Yes, I missed my family, but not the culture, not the place itself. 

    In reality, moving to the US clarified a lot of things for me. I have always been more American than Danish, I know that now. I've been loud, brazen, and always had big dreams and big gestures. Not in any way the proper little girl my mother tried to raise me to be. I had a terrible temper, that felt uncontrollable at times and a big voice that was repeatedly told to not shine too brightly, not to make the other kids feel bad. 

    This may seem harsh, but anyone from Denmark would notice this as "Janteloven" or "The Law of Jante" - a culturally-induced oppression that the Danes all know too well. Again, this is a phenomenon I will explain in depth in another chapter. Suffice it to say, it's a classic "crabs in a bucket" syndrome. When one tries to climb out the others will pull it back down.

    So I suppose I was not entirely caught in the middle. I sometimes describe myself as "half-and-half", with a chuckle. But that doesn't really describe me. In reality, I am more like 75/25. In the last ten years, I have learned to embrace my Danish roots, while also fully encompassing how American I really am. Immigrant heritage and all. 

    In truth, it probably doesn't matter what continent we are on. Denmark for me was a time in my life when I tried to hide who I truly was, in order to try and fit in. It was a time of listening to others over my own intuition, my inner voice. It was a time of not being and owning who I truly am and what my life's purpose is. The US for me has been the journey of fully growing into my true self. A journey of growth and self-exploration. Of owning all sides of me, even the ones I don't necessarily like. And most importantly listening to my own truth rather than what others say. It's not about Denmark and it's not about the US. It's about what each country represents to me and who I became during each timeframe I spent there. 

    I can now look at being "half-and-half" and feel grateful that I was blessed with so much diversity. And I can own my big voice and my larger than life attitude and put myself on a stage and feel right at home. But I can also remember where I came from, and what is truly important in life. Love of family, love of friends and most importantly, self-love.
    • July 30, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • Benton County Fair - Corvallis, OR

    JESSICA LYNNE

    Tour and Tickets

    My story is not ordinary. I feel pretty ordinary, on the inside. But when I tell people where I come from and how I got here, it usually stirs up a gasp or two. My official story simply states that I grew up in Denmark and now live in the Pacific Northwest, but there is much more to it than that. So I decided to tell it. 

    My childhood was spent divided on three different continents. Strangest of all, I was born in South America. Valdivia, Chile to be exact. My parents were missionaries, but soon after my arrival, they decided to move back to the US. I was 6 months old. Needless to say, I don't remember anything from Chile at all. I ended up with dual citizenship - but not a Chilean one, as you might think, but a Danish/American citizenship. 

    My parents met in New York. My mom, from a small town of Sejlflod in Jylland, Denmark. My Dad from the Pacific Northwest. So when they decided, with 6 months old me in their arms to move back to the US, they settled on Tacoma, WA. Kind of fortuitous that my journey should lead me back here - only about 10 blocks away from my first American home. But that's for a later chapter. 

    My parents divorced when I was three and my mother decided to move us, three girls, to Denmark. First Skanderborg, then what I now consider my hometown, Haslev. This is where I went to school, where I had friends, where I learned about life, and love and longing. This is where I grew up. If you can call yourself a "grown-up" at 17; that's when I moved away from home. 
    I then became what I would call a "Copenhagen nomade" moving almost 25 times in the 13 or so years I lived there, interrupted only by a 2-year stint in Barcelona - also a story for another chapter.

    I finally up-rooted, if I ever had roots, and moved to the Pacific Northwest in 2010 when I was 31.

    And that's the short, cliff notes version story. But that's not really how I want to tell it. I want to tell my story by delving into how that story made me, me. What it was like, being a part of two worlds, and what sometimes felt like not being a part of anything at all. Feeling like an outsider for all the wrong reasons, trying so hard to belong, but not feeling like I belonged at all.
    As a child, I would spend the entire year going to school and living my life in Haslev and every other summer I would visit my Dad in Seattle. The alternating summers, he would visit us. I spoke (and still do speak) both languages fluently... mostly without an accent in either language. My dad would call every week long-distance to keep in touch with us girls. And in the '80s that was not cheap! My mom, even though she is 100% Dane, would make traditional Danish cooking right alongside fried chicken and cornbread. I felt the duality every day. 

    Consequently, it somehow made me feel divided. Instead of belonging everywhere, I felt like I didn't belong anywhere. 
    I suppose, with a different outlook on life, this duality could have made me feel abundant, like a citizen of the world, who had many homes. But my upbringing in so many ways nourished lack and dependence. And it made me feel stretched too thin. I was too American to be Danish and too Danish to be American. So I was, effectively, neither.

    Every time I came back to Denmark I would miss the US terribly. But it was never actually true the other way around. This only occurred to me when I finally moved here, that the homesickness I would feel for the US when gone, never set in for Denmark. Yes, I missed my family, but not the culture, not the place itself. 

    In reality, moving to the US clarified a lot of things for me. I have always been more American than Danish, I know that now. I've been loud, brazen, and always had big dreams and big gestures. Not in any way the proper little girl my mother tried to raise me to be. I had a terrible temper, that felt uncontrollable at times and a big voice that was repeatedly told to not shine too brightly, not to make the other kids feel bad. 

    This may seem harsh, but anyone from Denmark would notice this as "Janteloven" or "The Law of Jante" - a culturally-induced oppression that the Danes all know too well. Again, this is a phenomenon I will explain in depth in another chapter. Suffice it to say, it's a classic "crabs in a bucket" syndrome. When one tries to climb out the others will pull it back down.

    So I suppose I was not entirely caught in the middle. I sometimes describe myself as "half-and-half", with a chuckle. But that doesn't really describe me. In reality, I am more like 75/25. In the last ten years, I have learned to embrace my Danish roots, while also fully encompassing how American I really am. Immigrant heritage and all. 

    In truth, it probably doesn't matter what continent we are on. Denmark for me was a time in my life when I tried to hide who I truly was, in order to try and fit in. It was a time of listening to others over my own intuition, my inner voice. It was a time of not being and owning who I truly am and what my life's purpose is. The US for me has been the journey of fully growing into my true self. A journey of growth and self-exploration. Of owning all sides of me, even the ones I don't necessarily like. And most importantly listening to my own truth rather than what others say. It's not about Denmark and it's not about the US. It's about what each country represents to me and who I became during each timeframe I spent there. 

    I can now look at being "half-and-half" and feel grateful that I was blessed with so much diversity. And I can own my big voice and my larger than life attitude and put myself on a stage and feel right at home. But I can also remember where I came from, and what is truly important in life. Love of family, love of friends and most importantly, self-love.
    • July 31, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • August 01, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • 2 sessions
    • Klamath County Fair - Klamath Falls, OR

    JESSICA LYNNE

    Tour and Tickets

    My story is not ordinary. I feel pretty ordinary, on the inside. But when I tell people where I come from and how I got here, it usually stirs up a gasp or two. My official story simply states that I grew up in Denmark and now live in the Pacific Northwest, but there is much more to it than that. So I decided to tell it. 

    My childhood was spent divided on three different continents. Strangest of all, I was born in South America. Valdivia, Chile to be exact. My parents were missionaries, but soon after my arrival, they decided to move back to the US. I was 6 months old. Needless to say, I don't remember anything from Chile at all. I ended up with dual citizenship - but not a Chilean one, as you might think, but a Danish/American citizenship. 

    My parents met in New York. My mom, from a small town of Sejlflod in Jylland, Denmark. My Dad from the Pacific Northwest. So when they decided, with 6 months old me in their arms to move back to the US, they settled on Tacoma, WA. Kind of fortuitous that my journey should lead me back here - only about 10 blocks away from my first American home. But that's for a later chapter. 

    My parents divorced when I was three and my mother decided to move us, three girls, to Denmark. First Skanderborg, then what I now consider my hometown, Haslev. This is where I went to school, where I had friends, where I learned about life, and love and longing. This is where I grew up. If you can call yourself a "grown-up" at 17; that's when I moved away from home. 
    I then became what I would call a "Copenhagen nomade" moving almost 25 times in the 13 or so years I lived there, interrupted only by a 2-year stint in Barcelona - also a story for another chapter.

    I finally up-rooted, if I ever had roots, and moved to the Pacific Northwest in 2010 when I was 31.

    And that's the short, cliff notes version story. But that's not really how I want to tell it. I want to tell my story by delving into how that story made me, me. What it was like, being a part of two worlds, and what sometimes felt like not being a part of anything at all. Feeling like an outsider for all the wrong reasons, trying so hard to belong, but not feeling like I belonged at all.
    As a child, I would spend the entire year going to school and living my life in Haslev and every other summer I would visit my Dad in Seattle. The alternating summers, he would visit us. I spoke (and still do speak) both languages fluently... mostly without an accent in either language. My dad would call every week long-distance to keep in touch with us girls. And in the '80s that was not cheap! My mom, even though she is 100% Dane, would make traditional Danish cooking right alongside fried chicken and cornbread. I felt the duality every day. 

    Consequently, it somehow made me feel divided. Instead of belonging everywhere, I felt like I didn't belong anywhere. 
    I suppose, with a different outlook on life, this duality could have made me feel abundant, like a citizen of the world, who had many homes. But my upbringing in so many ways nourished lack and dependence. And it made me feel stretched too thin. I was too American to be Danish and too Danish to be American. So I was, effectively, neither.

    Every time I came back to Denmark I would miss the US terribly. But it was never actually true the other way around. This only occurred to me when I finally moved here, that the homesickness I would feel for the US when gone, never set in for Denmark. Yes, I missed my family, but not the culture, not the place itself. 

    In reality, moving to the US clarified a lot of things for me. I have always been more American than Danish, I know that now. I've been loud, brazen, and always had big dreams and big gestures. Not in any way the proper little girl my mother tried to raise me to be. I had a terrible temper, that felt uncontrollable at times and a big voice that was repeatedly told to not shine too brightly, not to make the other kids feel bad. 

    This may seem harsh, but anyone from Denmark would notice this as "Janteloven" or "The Law of Jante" - a culturally-induced oppression that the Danes all know too well. Again, this is a phenomenon I will explain in depth in another chapter. Suffice it to say, it's a classic "crabs in a bucket" syndrome. When one tries to climb out the others will pull it back down.

    So I suppose I was not entirely caught in the middle. I sometimes describe myself as "half-and-half", with a chuckle. But that doesn't really describe me. In reality, I am more like 75/25. In the last ten years, I have learned to embrace my Danish roots, while also fully encompassing how American I really am. Immigrant heritage and all. 

    In truth, it probably doesn't matter what continent we are on. Denmark for me was a time in my life when I tried to hide who I truly was, in order to try and fit in. It was a time of listening to others over my own intuition, my inner voice. It was a time of not being and owning who I truly am and what my life's purpose is. The US for me has been the journey of fully growing into my true self. A journey of growth and self-exploration. Of owning all sides of me, even the ones I don't necessarily like. And most importantly listening to my own truth rather than what others say. It's not about Denmark and it's not about the US. It's about what each country represents to me and who I became during each timeframe I spent there. 

    I can now look at being "half-and-half" and feel grateful that I was blessed with so much diversity. And I can own my big voice and my larger than life attitude and put myself on a stage and feel right at home. But I can also remember where I came from, and what is truly important in life. Love of family, love of friends and most importantly, self-love.
    • August 03, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • August 07, 2020
    • (PDT)
    • Seattle Danish Center - Seattle, WA

    DANE CAMP FOR LITTLE VIKINGS

    Seattle, Washington
    August 3rd to August 7th, 2020

    Summer Camp for Ages 5-10 
    (For ages 10-18 see our other camp: Himmelbjerget)

    Camp Details

    Dane Camp for Little Vikings involves five fun days of Danish culture and language in an atmosphere designed for children ages 5 to 10. Camp is held every August at the Seattle Danish Center.

    Danish Language and Culture

    Join us for exciting days of crafts and activities related to a rotating theme.

    Dane Camp offers:
    -Daily Danish language and culture lessons
    -Danish arts and crafts
    -Outdoor/indoor sports and games
    -An introduction to traditional Danish food

    Camp Date and Time

    Dane Camp 2020 is from Monday, August 3rd to Friday, August 7th.
    Each day camp is from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm.
    For an additional fee, playtime is available before and after Dane Camp, between 8:30 am and 9:00 am and between 3:00 pm and 4:00 pm.

    Location

    Seattle Danish Center
    1833 N 105th Street, Room 205
    Seattle, WA 98133

    TO REGISTER

    The registration period for Dane Camp will begin Spring 2020. NWDA membersreceive a discount on camp registration fees.

    More About the Danish-filled Days of Dane Camp

    Dane Camp involves a mix of indoor and outdoor activities. Children are taken on outings to nearby parks to learn Danish sports and games. For meals everyone sits together in true Danish fashion, as they practice and discuss what they are learning. Kids are even introduced to traditional Danish food.

    There is a special open house and program for families during the afternoon on the last day of camp (Friday).

    Northwest Danish Association hosts and sponsors this summer day camp every year during the first week of August. Sign up for our e-bulletin to stay up to date on Dane Camp and other NWDA programs.

    Telephone - 206-523-3263 
    Email - 
    seattle@nwdanish.org

    NWDA Website

    NWDA Facebook

    • August 09, 2020
    • 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM (CDT)
    • Woodinville, WA

    ANNUAL DANISH COMMUNITY PICNIC

    Each year the Danish community in Seattle gathers for a Danish Community Picnic in August! To receive updates on the Danish Community Picnic and other NWDA programs, events, and activities, sign up for our e-bulletin mailing list.

    2020 Annual Picnic Details

    August 9th 11:00 am to 4:00 pm
    Woodinville (details TBA)

    Lawn games, a fish pond with prizes for kids, hotdogs, and more! Come enjoy a summer picnic with the Danish community in Seattle.
    All are welcome.

    Suggested donations:
    $7.00 for Hotdog and a beer
    $5.00 for Hotdog and pop/water
    (includes condiments, kringle, and coffee)
    A limited number of veggie dogs available.

    Bring any additional food and utensils you want for your family.
    Suggested items to bring: Small tables, chairs, or blankets

    For more information, contact Patti Olsen:
    Email olsenpn@aol.com
    Cell 206-910-9924

    Sponsored by:
    Sisterhood Lodge #40, Brotherhood Lodge #29, Northwest Danish Association, Danes Soccer Club and The Danish Club

    seattle@nwdanish.org

    www.nwdanish.org

    • August 19, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • August 21, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • Danebod Folk School - Tyler, MN

    VIRTUAL EVENT - 74th ANNUAL DANEBOD FOLK MEETING

    Danebod Website

    The 2020 Danebod Folk Meeting will be an on-line activity affirming the joy of living through enlightenment. The meeting will feature music, stories and lectures.

    Due to the COVID-19 virus the Danebod campus in Tyler, MN is closed for the summer 2020.

    You are invited to attend the on-line activity planned for August 19-21. We invite you to whip up a batch of kringle, brew a cup of coffee, and join us virtually on Zoom.

    There will be a Zoom tutorial held at 10 AM, Wednesday August 19, 2020.

    View schedule and programming on the website.

    Registration for this event is $150.  The registration form and additional details can be found on the website.  Please submit your registration and payment no later than July 15.

    Link to Registration

    Danebod Folk Meeting

    140 Danebod Court | Tyler, MN 56178 | (507) 247-3000

    danebodlutheran@yahoo.com | rickeann64@gmail.com


    • February 10, 2021
    • (CST)
    • February 10, 2025
    • (CST)
    • 5 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - BENEDICTE MARIE WRENSTED

    Benedicte Marie Wrensted (February 10, 1859 – January 19, 1949) was a notable Danish-American photographer best known for the many photographs she took of the Shoshone native people in Idaho. She is remembered for her documentation of the Northern Shoshone, Lemhi, and Bannock tribes in Idaho between 1895-1912.

    Born in Hjørring, Jutland, Benedicte learned photography (one the the few professions considered suitable for women at the time) from her aunt, Charlotte Borgen. She then opened her own studio in Horsens, which she ran until she emigrated to the United States in 1894. 

    After arriving in America, Benedicte moved to Pocatello, Idaho where her brother Peter had settled. Here she acquired a studio in 1895 where she took photographs of the local inhabitants and recorded the growth of the town. Her documentary photographs of the Shoshone and Bannock Native Americans are still considered to be of great anthropological importance. Many of her Native American images are preserved at the Smithsonian Institution and the National Archives.

    Wrensted's parents were Captain Carl V. Wrensted, later an innkeeper, and Johanne Borgen.  She grew up and attended school in Frederikshavn in the far north of Jutland. One of the few professions considered suitable for women at the time was photography. Wrensted learnt the craft in the 1880s from her aunt, Charlotte Borgen, who was a photographer in Frederikshavn.  She then opened a studio of her own in Horsens.

    She was known for her expressive handling of natural light and the painterly quality of her photographs. Wrensted photographed The Edmos, a prominent Native American family from the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, quite often.

    Wrensted became a U.S. citizen in 1912, at age 53, and the same year she ended her career as a photographer. She sold her studio in Pocatello and moved to Los Angeles where she died on January 19, 1949 shortly before her 90th birthday.

    Many of her Native American images are preserved at the Smithsonian Institution and the National Archives. In the fall of 1984, Smithsonian anthropologist, Joanna Cohan Scherer was looking for photographs in the Smithsonian Institute's "Handbook of North American Indian" and came across the clutter of the Bannock County Historical Society in Pocatello, Idaho. She came across some Bannock County images that had the imprint "B. Wrensted, Pocatello." After rediscovering these photographs and finding a collection of glass plate negatives in the National Archives labeled "Portraits of Indians from Southeastern Idaho Reservations, 1897".she was determined to find out more about Wrensted. She consulted tribal elders from the nearby Fort Hall Indian Reservation, wrote letters to people, checked business directories and looked through tons of museums and libraries in an effort to uncover the background of Wrensted and her photographs. The Idaho Museum of Natural History has a goal of demonstrating ways in which photographs can be placed within a historical context. Only 1% of Wrensted's images at the National Archives and Records Administration were identified at the onset of a digital library collection project. Once they were shown to the descendants at the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, information regarding families of origin were discovered and with the help of written records, 84% of Wrensted subjects have now been identified.

    Scherer encourages the reader to "go beyond consideration of Wrensted's portraits as art," by advocating for the identification of the individual people portrayed in the photos as a means of avoiding stereotyping and the characterization of generic Indians as more "noble savages". "What sets Wrensted's work apart," says Schere, "is her skill in portraying the humanity—the individuality—of the people who posed for her. She captured their presence with a dignity and beauty that transcend time and place." According to Scherer's estimates, today 170 of Wrensted's Shoshone Bannock images are known to exist in various collections, with a substantial number at the Idaho Museum of Natural History. Wrensted's photographs of her Indian subjects were not left with the people of the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, but were, as Scherer tells us, "uprooted from their place of origin and put into impersonal hands—namely, the National Archives in Washington, D.C."

    Idaho State University - Benedicte Wrensted Collection:

    View Collection Online

    • May 05, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • May 09, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • Renaissance Hotel - Seattle, WA

    DANISH AMERICAN HERITAGE SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

    2021 Danish American Heritage Society Conference
    Traditions and Transitions: Ways of Being Danish
    May 5-9, 2021 (Thursday-Sunday)




    ​Venue
    Renaissance Seattle Hotel
     515 Madison St, Seattle, WA 98104
    +1 206-583-0300​

    Picture

    ​The Danish American Heritage Society is pleased to announce and invites you to attend our next international conference on May 5-9, 2021 at the Renaissance Seattle Hotel in Seattle, Washington. This conference is being held in conjunction with the 111th annual meeting of the Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study.
    The organizing theme of our conference is “Traditions and Transitions: Ways of Being Danish,” which we hope will provide ample scope for exploring the identities and experiences of Danes and Danish Americans past and present. We also invite the submission of proposals for papers and presentations on topics related to this theme, which may include (but are not limited to):

    • The role of religious, educational, and/or artistic institutions, such as Danish folk high schools, in shaping and preserving Danish traditions
    • Literary, artistic, cinematic, and/or musical depictions of individual and social transitions
    • Culinary and handicraft traditions of Danes and Danish Americans
    • Political and economic transitions, such as the 1917 sale of the Virgin Islands or joining the European Union, that inspired new traditions and challenged old ones
    • Linguistic shifts in Danish and English related to people in transit
    • Translation into and out of Danish and its dialects
    • Past and present migrations into, within, and out of Denmark

    ​Individual presenters wishing to submit a proposal for a paper or presentation of 20 minutes should send their name, email address, paper title, abstract (maximum 300 words), and a short biography of the speaker (maximum 150 words) to dahs2021conference@gmail.com by October 1, 2020.

    Although cultures may seem to be fixed, they are always in transition, navigating between tried and true traditions and new opportunities and innovations. Even the potato, which seems today to be a quintessential part of Danish food culture, was a novel import in the 17th century that seemed both foreign and somewhat suspect. Cultural heritage is the product of many generations’ attempts to hold on to practices and beliefs that give meaning to their identities as members of a national, linguistic, or ethnic group, while also dealing with the changes and challenges that they inevitably encounter. People in transit, particularly those who leave their homelands for prolonged periods of time, are also in a state of “in-betweenness,” trying to preserve their cultural traditions while adapting to their new environments. In so doing, they negotiate both a past that is receding and a future that can only be imagined.

    Conference Committee for the 2021 DAHS Conference - Traditions and Transitions: Ways of Being Danish​:

    • Lynette Rasmussen (Honorary Danish Consul, Des Moines, Iowa)
    • Linda Steffensen (Editor of Den Danske Pioneer, Chicago, Illinois)
    • ​Julie K. Allen (Professor, College of Humanities, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah)​

    • June 25, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • June 27, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • Menucha Retreat & Conference Center - Corbett, OR

    2021 DANISH AMERICAN CULTURAL RETREAT

    Be sure to reserve June 25 to 27for the Danish American Cultural Retreat also held at the Menucha Retreat Center in Corbett, Oregon. Interesting programs about Denmark, topics revolving around history and modern times, and book re views have all been on the agenda. We reserve the amount of space we need well in advance so be sure to watch for registration dates. Both Himmelbjerget and DACR are held near Corbett, Oregon at the beautiful Menucha Retreat and Conference Center. 

    Menucha Retreat and Conference Center
    38711 E Historic Columbia River Hwy
    Corbett, OR  97019

    Telephone (NWDA) - 206-523-3263
    Emailseattle@nwdanish.org  

    NWDA Website

    NWDA Facebook

    • June 27, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • July 03, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • Menucha Retreat & Conference Center - Corbett, OR

    2021 HIMMELBJERGET DANISH CAMP

    Himmelbjerget Danish Camp offers a unique opportunity for kids 10 to 18 to learn about the history, people, culture, language and traditions of Denmark at a week- long overnight summer camp in the Columbia Gorge.


    Menucha Retreat and Conference Center
    38711 E Historic Columbia River Hwy
    Corbett, OR  97019

    Telephone (NWDA) - 206-523-3263
    Emailseattle@nwdanish.org

    NWDA Website

    NWDA Facebook


National Foundation for Danish America
PO Box 1003
Wilmette, Illinois 60091

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