event Calendar

northern california United States (bay area)

    • April 22, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • April 22, 2023
    • (CDT)
    • 3 sessions
    • The Planet Earth

    EARTH DAY

    Earth Day was founded in 1970 as a day of education about environmental issues, and Earth Day 2021 will occur on Thursday, April 22—the holiday's 51st anniversary. The holiday is now a global celebration that’s sometimes extended into Earth Week, a full seven days of events focused on green living. The brainchild of Senator Gaylord Nelson and inspired by the protests of the 1960s, Earth Day began as a “national teach-in on the environment” and was held on April 22 to maximize the number of students that could be reached on university campuses. By raising public awareness of pollution, Nelson hoped to bring environmental causes into the national spotlight.

    Earth Day - Official Site

    Earth Day History 

    By the early 1960s, Americans were becoming aware of the effects of pollution on the environment. Rachel Carson’s 1962 bestseller Silent Springraised the specter of the dangerous effects of pesticides on the American countryside. Later in the decade, a 1969 fire on Cleveland’s Cuyahoga Rivershed light on the problem of chemical waste disposal. Until that time, protecting the planet’s natural resources was not part of the national political agenda, and the number of activists devoted to large-scale issues such as industrial pollution was minimal. Factories pumped pollutants into the air, lakes and rivers with few legal consequences. Big, gas-guzzling cars were considered a sign of prosperity. Only a small portion of the American population was familiar with–let alone practiced–recycling. - History

    • May 01, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • May 31, 2021
    • (CDT)

    MAY IS DANISH AMERICAN BIKE TO WORK MONTH

    Danish American organizations are rallying together during the month of May for National Bike to Work month! Join this challenge with us and post pictures of your bike ride to work or school on social media with the hashtag #BiketoWorkUSADK from May 1st to May 31st, 2021. You can also post your pictures in the Facebook group!

    Send your pictures to line@nwdanish.org if would like your picture included in a virtual photo album after the bike to work month is complete. Please send your photos by June 1st.

    We have a variety of categories for biking to work, school, or even biking at home. We will choose a winner for each category at the end of the month. The categories are:

    **Longest ride (distance)

    **Shortest ride - must be outdoors!

    **Steepest elevation climb

    **All dressed up!

    **Most scenic ride to work

    **Longest ride on a stationary bike (distance)

    Riders will be chosen based on self-reported information and the honor system. If you would like to be considered for a category, at the end of the month you can send an e-mail to line@nwdanish.org with your ride details. Details you can include are the distance you rode to work (one way), your route’s elevation climb (this can be found on Google Maps), pictures of your bike outfit to work, and/or any scenic pictures from your route.

    Let’s bike to work like the Danes do!

    ~Mary DeLorme and Fidelma McGinn, Scan Design Foundation

    ~Edith Christensen and Line Larsen, Northwest Danish Association

    Participating groups: Scan Design Foundation, Northwest Danish Association, National Foundation for Danish America, Museum of Danish America, Nordic Northwest, University of Wisconsin

    To be added to the list of participating groups, please send an e-mail to line@nwdanish.org

    Join the Facebook Group!


    • May 01, 2021
    • (PDT)
    • February 05, 2022
    • (PST)
    • 10 sessions
    • Kastania Fælled- Petaluma, CA

    DANISH SOLDIERS CLUB MONTHLY MEETING

    We will host an outdoor meeting on March 6th, 2021. Should you choose to participate, please bring your own food, drink, and utensils, and of course, practice all the usual safety protocols, to comply with county guidelines:

    All buildings except the restrooms will be closed.
    Members will provide their own lunch and beverages. The bar will be closed.
    Your group may be up to 10 people sitting together.
    Picnic tables will be spaced 6 feet apart.
    Face coverings are required until you are seated with your group.

    And, no reservations are necessary! Welcome, to all who can make it!

      The Danish Soldiers Club gathers on the first Saturday of every month, at 4560 Kastania Road, Petaluma. If you don’t have GPS, see the map at the bottom of this page.

      The Board of Directors meets at 11am.

      The General Membership schedule:
      11am – 12 pm:  Gathering and Fellowship; the bar is open.
      12pm:                  The Flag Ceremony and National Anthems.
      12:15pm:            The General Membership Meeting commences.
      1pm:                    Lunch is served.

      The 2021 schedule will depend on the opening of restrictions. When it is allowable, the same protocols that were in place for outdoor meetings last year will apply.

      The 2021 schedule MIGHT look like this:
      January 2:      There is no meeting. Happy New Year!
      February 6:    Meeting cancelled.
      March 6:          Smørrebrød lunch at Kastania.
      April 3:             Smørrebrød lunch at Kastania.
      May 1:               New York Strip Steak BBQ at Kastania.
      June 5:               Smørrebrød lunch at Kastania.
      July 3:                Smørrebrød lunch at Kastania.
      August 7:          Smørrebrød lunch at Kastania.
      September 4:  New York Strip Steak BBQ at Kastania.
      October 2:        Smørrebrød lunch at Kastania, board nominations.
      November 6:   Smørrebrød lunch at Kastania, board election.
      December 19:  Julefest at the Sonoma Veterans Memorial Hall

      Kastania Fælled is located at 4560 Kastania Road. Take Hwy 101 to the Kastania Road exit, turn  west, and follow the road. There is a sign that says “No Outlet,” and that’s the one you want. It will turn and head south along the freeway. The Gate is marked by a Danish flag, and our meeting house is at the end of the long dirt driveway.

      Soldiers Club Website


      • May 02, 2021
      • 11:00 AM (CDT)
      • Online - Zoom Meeting

      REBILD NATIONAL PARK SOCIETY - BOARD MEETING

      Online zoom meeting of Full Rebild Board - Denmark and U.S.A.

      11:00am Central (Chicago)

      Rebild Website

      Rebild Facebook

      • May 07, 2021
      • (PDT)
      • September 09, 2021
      • (PDT)
      • 5 sessions
      • Concert Schedule

      MADS TOLLING - CONCERT SCHEDULE

      Venue & Tickets

      Internationally renowned Danish violinist, composer and two-time Grammy Award-winner Mads Tolling is a former member of the Turtle Island Quartet and The Stanley Clarke Band. He has toured internationally and has released three studio albums: “The Playmaker,” “Celebrating Jean-Luc Ponty-Live at Yoshi’s,” and “Mads Tolling & The Mads Men — Playing the 60s.” Mads has been featured on NPR’s Morning Edition, and his recordings have received rave reviews in Downbeat Magazine, Strings Magazine, the Washington Post, and the San Francisco Chronicle. Mads Tolling and The Mads Men bring a fun and exciting program that is as nostalgic as it is contemporary, with reimagined classic songs from 1960s television, film, and radio. The repertoire in the music of the mad men era ranges from “Mission Impossible” and “The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly” to “A Taste of Honey” and “Georgia on my Mind.”

      In addition to his illustrious career as a performer, Mads Tolling is also an active composer and educator, creating work on his original albums and leading masterclasses and workshops throughout the U.S. and Canada as a certified Yamaha clinician.

      Mads Tolling Website

      Mads Tolling Facebook

      • May 07, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • January 07, 2022
      • (CST)
      • 10 sessions
      • Odd Fellows Hall - Reno, NV

      VALDEMAR #12 & DANNEVIRKE #9 MEETING

      Meeting on Zoom

      1st Friday of every month.
      7:00PM Meeting

      Odd Fellows Hall
      1300 Stardust St
      Reno, NV  89503 

      For More Information including membership, please contact - Grand Secretaries - Tim Heer tim-gs@sbcglobal.net or Natalie Heer natalie-gs@sbcglobal.net.

      Danish Societies Website

      • May 12, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • September 08, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • 5 sessions
      • Odd Fellows Building - San Francisco, CA

      DANMARK #2 & THYRA #3 MEETING

      Meetings on Zoom

      2nd Wednesday of every month.
      6:30 Social Hour
      7:30 Meeting

      For More Information including membership, please contact - Grand Secretaries - Tim Heer tim-gs@sbcglobal.net or Natalie Heer natalie-gs@sbcglobal.net.

      Odd Fellows Building
      26 7th Street
      San Francisco, CA  94103

      Danish Societies Website

      • May 13, 2021
      • (PDT)
      • September 09, 2021
      • (PDT)
      • 5 sessions
      • California Bay Area - Temporarily on Zoom

      DANISH AMERICAN WOMEN'S CLUB MEETING

      Lunch meeting - 2nd Thursday of Each Month
      Various Bay Area Restaurants 

      Temporarily conducting zoom gatherings during COVID

      Please Join Us!

      For More Info Contact:
      Bente Ellis - Email bentefr@comcast.net

      • May 13, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • August 12, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • 4 sessions
      • Temporarily on Zoom

      THYRA #9 & VALBORG #1

      Meetings on Zoom Until Further Notice

      2nd Thursday of every month.
      6:30PM Meeting

      20920 Redwood Rd
      Castro Valley, CA  94546

      For More Information including membership, please contact - Grand Secretaries - Tim Heer tim-gs@sbcglobal.net or Natalie Heer natalie-gs@sbcglobal.net.


      Danish Society Website

      • May 15, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • September 15, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • 4 sessions
      • Online - New Issue Available

      CHURCH AND LIFE - NEW ISSUE

      For more information and to Subscribe...

      Subscribe Here

      CHURCH AND LIFE: A BRIEF HISTORY

      by Thorvald Hansen

      Church and Life (originally, Kirke og Folk) was begun by the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church in 1952 as an exclusively Danish publication in line with its original purpose which was to serve the Danish readership of the church. Until the 1930s the official church paper had been Kirkelig Samler, but when this had been replaced by the English language publication, Lutheran Tidings, the Danish readers were served by a page called Kirkelig Samler in the Danish language Dannevirke, a privately owned weekly which was unofficially related to the church. When this publication ceased in1951, Danish news of the church was no longer available and this was missed, particularly by older readers. It was to fill this vacuum that the new Danish publication was begun.

      The first issues were distributed gratis to some 750 individuals who might be interested, but within a short time it became a subscription paper with some 1,000 subscribers. It was a 16 page paper issued twice monthly. When the Lutheran Church in America was born in 1963 and Lutheran Tidings ceased publication, some of the readers of that paper became subscribers to Church and Life. Today it has become an exclusively English language publication of 12 to l6 pages (depending on the material available) and is issued monthly. The subscription price is $20 per year. Gifts and memorials make up the shortfall, and the paper continues to function in the black. For its content the paper depends upon the voluntary contributions of a significant number of writers. The December issue is at least twice the normal size for Christmas .

      In 1983 the name was changed to Church and Life. This is not, nor was it intended to be, a translation of the Danish, but rather an indication that the church body out of which it grew was concerned also with this earthly life.

      Throughout its long history the paper has had six full time editors: Holger Strandskov, Paul Wikman, Michael Mikkelsen, Johannes Knudsen, and Thorvald Hansen. The present editor, Joy Ibsen, is the daughter of a former pastor in the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church.
      Currently the paper serves some 460 subscribers as a tie that binds them, not only to one another, but to the religious and social environment with which they have been familiar. This is not an exclusive group, nor are they guided by nostalgia, but one to which any and all who share similar values are more than welcome.


      Reference: Evangelical Lutheran Church in America


      • June 05, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • Virtual Event

      DANISH AMERICAN HERITAGE SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

      The May In-Person Conference has been rescheduled for Saturday, June 5 as a Virtual Conference.  Here is the Conference Schedule (Central Standard Time) -

      9:30 AM 
      Opening Ceremonies

      9:45 AM 
      Communal Song in Denmark
      Keynote Q&A

      11:00 AM
      Transnational Identities Q&A
      Art in Denmark Q&A

      Noon
      Approaches to Kierkegaard Q&A
      Denmark Becoming Modern Q&A

      1:00 PM
      Moments in Danish History Q&A
      Reading Denmark Q&A

      2:30 PM
      Plenary Roundtable: Seeking Relevance in a Changing World
      Museum of Danish America Q&A

      2021 Danish American Heritage Society Conference
      Traditions and Transitions: Ways of Being Danish


      DAHS Website

      • July 03, 2021
      • 12:00 PM (CDT)
      • July 05, 2021
      • 1:00 PM (CDT)
      • Rebild National Park near Aalborg, Denmark

      REBILD FESTIVAL IN DENMARK

      Celebration of Danish American Friendship - The annual Rebild Festival at the Rebild National Park near Aalborg, Denmark

      Official Detailed 2021 Schedule to be Announced

      The 2021 Rebild Celebration will be a combination of live and on-line events.

      July 3 - Rebild Park events and Gala in Aalborg

      July 4 - Tent Luncheon and Festival in the Rebild Hills

      July 5 - General Membership Meeting

      Rebild US

      Rebild - Denmark

      Rebild National Park Society

      We are a Danish-American Friendship organization,
      playing an important part in these areas:

      • Unique 4th of July Festival in Denmark with Royalty and dignitaries from both countries

      • Preservation of Danish culture and heritage in USA

      • Assistance to Danish newcomers with acclimatization and business networking

      • Help and insight into Danish thinking for Americans doing business with Denmark

      • Friend-shipping and socializing

      • Study abroad scholarships to Denmark

      • Professional full color news magazine two times a year plus Rebild E-News.

      • Annual Conference (each year in a different state in the US)

      Ties of Friendship
      It all began more than one hundred years ago in America. A gathering of Danish-Americans came up with a vision ofa special place in Denmark where they could gather once a year to meet with relatives and friends. And symbolically, as a statement confirming that those who had left would not forget where they had come from. Emigration began gradually in the economically difficult years following the Napoleon Wars, when the country was going bankrupt and having lost Norway. it is estimated that as many as 300,000 Danes emigrated in the years up to the First World War. Exact numbers are not possible because, after 1864, Danes from Southern Iylland were registered as German emigrants.

      Their incentive to leave was the dream of finding freedom and a better life. They especially sought out the northern states in the USA, as did other emigrants from the Scandinavian countries, because the climate and land reminded them of what they had left behind. It had an especial attraction for farmers. The western part of the country offered free land, with the provision they would fence the property, cultivate the land, and by the end ofthe first year, have erected a house with a door and window. Normally only the door and windows that were made of wood, the rest of the house was made of sod! It was hard work but worth the effort. For most, it was a good decision.

      But the emigrants never forgot their homeland and early in the twentieth century they purchased land in the old country. In the beginning they flocked to outdoor meetings near Himmelbjeret, as recorded by Ieppe Aakjaer on “Ienle” and Johan Skjoldborg on "Dynaes." These large outdoor gatherings are a popular tradition we have perpetuated through the years. Most of the emigrants had Iyske roots and it was instinctive for them to seek to meet here. The man with the most initiative was Max Henius from Aalborg, and the land eventually selected was the beautiful hilly heather covered ground in the outskirts of Forest of Rold — Rebild Bakker.

      There were more than 10,000 participants at the first Rebild Festival in 1912, and it was estimated that more than 1,000 came from America. Viewed through today's eyes it was impressive. It was expensive and difficult to travel so far — across America by land and the Atlantic Ocean by boat. The King Christian the 10th participated with Queen Alexandrine and accepted the deed for 140 tender land (equal to approximately 1,363 acres) with the requirement: “... that every year on July 4th, America's Independence Day, a "Rebild Festival" would be held in the Hills." Throughout the intervening years the Royal Family have been active in the Festival. We are happy and thankful for that.

      We have been told that the 4th of July celebration in Denmark is the largest outside the USA. We are proud of that. It’s a wonderful tradition that has continued over the past 100 years. It is a testament to the unbreakable friendship that exists between our two nations who share a common appreciation for freedom and democracy. We stand together!

      • September 09, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • September 11, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • DoubleTree Hotel - Modesto, CA

      DANISH SOCIETIES OF DANIA & DANNEBROG - 2021 CONVENTION

      DoubleTree Hotel
      1150 9th St
      Modesto, CA. 95354

      The Danish Societies of Dania and Dannebrog of California and Nevada have rescheduled their annual convention for September 9-11, 2021.  The change is due to COVID, and it is hoped that the September dates will be late enough to allow for a safe gathering.  The convention, where Grand Lodge officers and delegates meet to conduct annual business and elect new officers, will be held at the Double Tree Hotel in Modesto, California.

          In their December 2020 newsletter, it was stated, “In light of the issues affected by Covid 19, our Annual Dania & Dannebrog Conventions had to be postponed from April 22-24, 2021 to September 9-11, 2021. Both Executive Committees ponder on this topic and felt we were delaying our date well after the benefit of the newly implemented vaccine program will be in place. Hopefully, there will be no need for further delays. Please mark your calendars. Remember our theme will be a Celebration of the American Graffiti, so come prepared for our casual Friday night attired in your 1950-60’s garb. We will keep you posted of any additional changes that may occur. John Scheuber and the Bornholm Convention Committee”.

           Dania Grand President Jana Heer said that the past year has been difficult as most of the lodge meetings have been canceled, as well as the original 2020 convention which had been planned for April.  She said that one lodge has been using Zoom for their meetings.  They’ve also been using telephone conference calls.  Jana holds the distinction as the first female Dania Grand President who has also served as Dannebrog Grand President.

           The shared mission of The Danish Societies of Dania & Dannebrog is stated on their website, “We are a charitable organization that honors and celebrates Danish American heritage.  We raise and maintain funds so that we can comfort the sick and distressed, award scholarships to our youth and supplement our retiree’s pensions.  We meet regularly to network, enjoy Danish customs, and always have a good time. We are looking for new friendships to enrich our club.”

           During normal times, the branches have wonderful monthly gatherings to celebrate their Danish heritage with much “hygge” and great food.  They encourage anyone interested in Danish culture to join them, as they are always looking for new members.  They also maintain a scholarship fund for college students who are members, or children of members.

           California branches are located in San Francisco, Fresno, Salinas, Livermore, Castro Valley, Petaluma, Ferndale, San Jose, Santa Maria, Solvang, and Modesto.  The Nevada branch is in Reno.  Anyone interested in more information, or membership is encouraged to contact the Grand Secretaries - Tim Heer tim-gs@sbcglobal.net or Natalie Heer natalie-gs@sbcglobal.net.

      Danish Societies Website

      • September 15, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • September 15, 2022
      • (CDT)
      • 3 sessions

      BODTKER GRANTS - DEADLINE

      Deadlines for Submission: April 15 and September 15

      The Danish American Heritage Society is pleased to offer grants to qualified researchers for study in area of common interest. Bodtker Grants provide stipends of up to $5,000 for students or graduates interested in exploring  topics related to Danish history and heritage in North America. 


      A Bodtker Grant is primarily intended for research and internship at Danish American Archive and Library in Blair, Nebraska; the Danish American Archive at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa; or the Museum of Danish America in Elk Horn, Iowa. At the Board's discretion, proposals involving other Danish cultural and archival institutions may be considered.

      Deadlines: April 15 (Notification: May) or September 15(Notification: October)
      Stipend Amount: Up to $5,000

      Grant Application

      DAHS Website


      • October 31, 2021
      • (CDT)
      • October 31, 2022
      • (CDT)
      • 2 sessions

      A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - PETER LASSEN

      Peter Lassen (31 Oct 1800 - 26 April 1859) born in Farum (Copenhagen), Denmark in 1800, is the namesake for both Lassen County and Lassen Volcanic National Park. He was a blacksmith by trade and characterized the “old pioneer” spirit and explorations of the Wild West. (Historical records differ on his specific birth date.)

      Lassen began his life in America in Boston, moved to Philadelphia and Missouri as he continued westward, eventually reaching Oregon, Fort Ross and Bodega Bay. He traveled south to Sutter’s Fort in Sacramento, where he was appointed to a posse to look for horses stolen from Sutter’s Ranch.

      When Lassen arrived at the confluence of the Sacramento River and Deer Creek, he was so impressed with the country side, he obtained the required Mexican citizenship so he could purchase 22,000 acres at Deer Creek. In 1845 he established the Bosuejo Ranch and then returned to Missouri to bring people to live there. The emigrants in his group were the first to cross the Lassen Trail.

      He established Benton City, also known as Lassen Ranch. He built Adobe buildings, a blacksmith shop and a store. Benton City became one of the most important sites in Northern California at the time. It was a residence for Colonel Fremont in 1846, for he and 60 of his men.

      Lassen later sold and divided his property holdings between two men and went prospecting for gold. Lassen found gold in 1855 in Honey Lake Valley and held many leadership positions. One of his many roles was president of the Nataqua Territory and surveyor. He was friends with several Native American tribes. He and his party built a cabin for the winter. The cabin burned down in 1896 and was not replaced.

      Lassen continued to search for additional locations for prospecting. He discovered a silver mine near Black Rock Dessert in Nevada. He organized a scouting party of two groups to meet at Black Rock Canyon. The day after he and his two traveling companions, Edward Clapper and Lemericus Wyatt, arrived at the site in April of 1859, Lassen and Clapper were shot and killed. Speculation remains if the shot was indeed fired by a Native American or a member of his own scouting party. Native Americans are attributed for their deaths on the Lassen Monument. Wyatt escaped being shot and rode 124 miles to Susanville to share the tragic news.

      A scouting party was able to recover Lassen’s body, but not Clapper’s. Area residents erected a monument to Lassen to recognize him for the many good deeds of his lifetime. He is buried under the Ponderosa pine tree he camped his first night in the Honey Lake Valley. The original monument burned in 1917 and was replaced with the current one.

      According to historic documents, Clapper’s body was recovered in May 1990 by rock hunters in the Black Rock Desert. They found a skull and upper body skeleton that was determined to be the remains of Edward Clapper. In May of 1992, his remains were placed at the Lassen Monument located on Wingfield Road, just south of Susanville.

      Lassen County

      High in the northeastern Sierra is Lassen County, where volcanic activity has shaped the landscape. Peter Lassen, a Danish immigrant, came to Oregon in 1839 and later settled in the northern Sacramento Valley. He returned to Missouri and led a 12-wagon emigrant train along “Lassen Emigrant Trail” in 1848 into California. - Wikipedia


      • December 01, 2021
      • (CST)
      • December 01, 2024
      • (CST)
      • 4 sessions

      THIS DATE IN DANISH AMERICAN HISTORY - THE DANISH SISTERHOOD OF AMERICA

      The Danish Sisterhood of America was founded on December 1, 1883 by Christine Hemmingsen, a Danish immigrant from Orup, Denmark. Inspired by the success of the Danish Brotherhood of America, Mrs. Hemmingsen established Christine Lodge #1 in Negaunee, Michigan. The Danish Sisterhood of today continues to grow with numerous lodges located throughout the United States and Canada.

      The Danish culture is rich – its history long and distinguished, going back thousands of years. Membership in the Danish Sisterhood of America is a wonderful opportunity to connect with your Danish heritage, learn more about Danish customs and traditions, and strengthen your connection to Denmark. A cordial invitation is extended to you to join the largest national Danish organization dedicated to preserving and sharing these deeply rooted traditions. 

      Danish Sisterhood History

      Danish Sisterhood Website

      • February 05, 2022
      • (CST)
      • February 05, 2023
      • (CST)
      • 2 sessions
      • Denmark

      A ROYAL BIRTHDAY - 
      HRH THE CROWN PRINCESS

      Mary Elizabeth, Her Royal Highness Crown Princess, Crown Princess of Denmark, Countess of Monpezat

      Born:  Her Royal Highness Crown Princess Mary was born on 5 February 1972 in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.

      Marriage:  
      On 14 May 2004, on the occasion of her marriage to His Royal Highness Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark, she became Her Royal Highness Crown Princess Mary Elizabeth of Denmark. The marriage ceremony took place in Copenhagen Cathedral, and the wedding festivities were held at Fredensborg Palace.

      Family Photo: Franne Voigt 

      Children:  HRH Prince Christian Valdemar Henri John, born on 15 October 2005, HRH Princess Isabella Henrietta Ingrid Margrethe, born on 21 April 2007, HRH Prince Vincent Frederik Minik Alexander, born on 8 January 2011 and HRH Princess Josephine Sophia Ivalo Mathilda, born on 8 January 2011.

      Family:  The Crown Princess is the youngest daughter of John Dalgleish Donaldson, who was born in Scotland on 5 September 1941. He is a Professor of Applied Mathematics. Her mother was Mrs. Henrietta Clark Donaldson, born 12 May 1942.  
      The couple were married in Edinburgh, Scotland on 31 August 1963 and emigrated to Australia in November that year. They became Australian citizens in 1975. Crown Princess Mary’s mother worked as the Executive Assistant to the Vice Chancellor of The University of Tasmania. Henrietta Clark Donaldson died 20 November 1997.  On 5 September 2001, Professor John Donaldson married Susan Elizabeth Donaldson (née Horwood), an author from Britain. The Crown Princess has two sisters and a brother: Jane Alison Stephens, born 26 December 1965, Patricia Anne Bailey, born 16 March 1968, and John Stuart Donaldson, born 9 July 1970.

      Crown Princess Mary's biography on The Royal House website - 

      HRH The Crown Princess

      • April 01, 2022
      • (CDT)
      • April 01, 2024
      • (CDT)
      • 3 sessions

      BODTKER GRANTS - DEADLINE

      Deadline for Submission: April 15

      The Danish American Heritage Society is pleased to offer grants to qualified researchers for study in area of common interest. Bodtker Grants provide stipends of up to $5,000 for students or graduates interested in exploring  topics related to Danish history and heritage in North America. 


      A Bodtker Grant is primarily intended for research and internship at Danish American Archive and Library in Blair, Nebraska; the Danish American Archive at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa; or the Museum of Danish America in Elk Horn, Iowa. At the Board's discretion, proposals involving other Danish cultural and archival institutions may be considered.

      Deadlines: April 15 (Notification: May) or September 15(Notification: October)
      Stipend Amount: Up to $5,000

      Grant Application

      DAHS Website


      • April 02, 2022
      • (CDT)
      • April 02, 2023
      • (CDT)
      • 2 sessions

      HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN BIRTHDAY
       
      Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875)
      , Danish author and poet, wrote many poems, plays, stories and travel essays, but is best known for his fairy tales of which there are over one hundred and fifty, published in numerous collections during his life and many still in print today.

      His first collection of Fairy Tales, Told for Children was published in 1835. He broke new ground for Danish literature with his style and use of idiom, irony and humor, memorable characters and un-didactic moral teaching inspired by the primitive folk tales he had learned as a child. Though they do not all end happily his Fairy Tales resound with an authenticity that only unabashed sincerity can produce from a man who could still see through a child’s eyes;

      “Thousands of lights were burning on the green branches, and gaily-colored pictures, such as she had seen in the shop-windows, looked down upon her. The little maiden stretched out her hands towards them when--the match went out. The lights of the Christmas tree rose higher and higher, she saw them now as stars in heaven; one fell down and formed a long trail of fire.” —from “The Little Match Girl”

      Andersen’s fairy tales of fantasy with moral lessons are popular with children and adults all over the world, and they also contain autobiographical details of the man himself. Born on 2 April, 1805 in Odense, on the Danish island of Funen, Denmark, he was the only son of washerwoman Anna Maria Andersdatter (d.1833) and shoemaker Hans Andersen (d.1816). They were very poor, but Hans took his son to the local playhouse and nurtured his creative side by making him his own toys. Young Hans grew to be tall and lanky, awkward and effeminate, but he loved to sing and dance, and he had a vivid imagination that would soon find its voice.  - The Literature Network

      HC Andersen Website
      by The University of Southern Denmark, Odense
      (In Danish and English)

      This Hans Christian Andersen Museum Asks You to Step Into a Fairy Tale

      Opening soon in the storyteller’s hometown of Odense, Denmark, the museum allows visitors to experience his multilayered stories

      Livia Gershon

      Kreditering Kengo Kuma and Associates, Cornelius Vöge, MASU planning (2).jpg“It’s not a historical museum,” Henrik Lübker says. “It’s more an existential museum.” (Kengo Kuma and Associates, Cornelius Vöge, MASU planning)

      smithsonianmag.com 
      March 2, 2021

      Most museums dedicated to a specific historical figure aim to teach visitors about that person. But, the new H.C. Andersen's House, scheduled to open this summer in Denmark, is an exception to the rule.

      The museum’s creative director, Henrik Lübker, says the museum in Odense is designed not to showcase Andersen’s life and his classic stories like “The Little Mermaid” and “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” but to echo the sensibility of a fairy tale writer who rarely offered his audience simple lessons.

      “It’s not a historical museum,” he says. “It’s more an existential museum.”

      Renderings of the museum, which includes 60,000 square feet of building space plus 75,000 square feet of gardens, all designed by Japanese architect Kengo Kumareveal that it is full of curves. Labyrinthine hedges almost merge with sinuous wooden pavilions, blurring the line between nature and architecture. A long ramp leads underground only to reveal an unexpected garden.

      “It’s kind of like a universe where nothing is quite as it seems,” Lübker says. “Everything you thought you knew can be experienced anew.”

      Kreditering Kengo Kuma and Associates, Cornelius Vöge, MASU planning (1).jpgRenderings of the museum, designed by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma, reveal that it is full of curves. (Kengo Kuma and Associates, Cornelius Vöge, MASU planning)

      Andersen’s own story has a fairy-tale arc. He was born in 1805 to a mother who worked as a washerwoman in Odense. Yet he dreamed of being a famous writer. He persistently pursued theater directors and potential benefactors, eventually winning help from a wealthy family to continue his education and learn to function in sophisticated circles.

      “For a long time he was notorious for being a preposterous young man who came from a dirt poor family,” says Jack Zipes, literature professor emeritus at the University of Minnesota and author of Hans Christian Andersen: The Misunderstood Storyteller.

      Despite setbacks—his first poetry and novels were, in Zipes’ words, “not very good, and in fact terrible”—Andersen persisted in seeking recognition for his work. When he eventually wrote “The Ugly Duckling” in 1843, Zipes says, it was clear to everyone in Denmark’s small literary circles that it was a work of autobiography. It’s easy to imagine the experiences that might have led Andersen to describe the tribulations of the little swan, who, according to another duck, was “too big and strange, and therefore he needs a good whacking.”

      Hans Christian AndersenPortrait of Hans Christian Andersen in 1862 (Photo12/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

      Andersen’s own emergence as something close to a respected swan of an author came after he began publishing fairy tales in 1835. Unlike the Brothers Grimm—contemporaries whom Andersen admired—he did not collect folk tales but instead adapted existing stories or wrote his own from scratch. According to Maria Tatar, professor emeritus at Harvard University and author of The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen, Andersen most likely learned some of the basic plots he used, as well as storytelling techniques, while spending time in spinning rooms and other workplaces his mother shared with women when he was a child. Although his first story collection, published in 1835, was titled Fairy Tales Told for Children, he always noted that he was writing for a multigenerational audience, including many jokes and ideas that would have gone over kids’ heads.

      While some of his stories have apparent moral lessons, many are more ambiguous, or subversive, particularly in terms of relations between the social classes. In “The Tinderbox,” published in 1835, a spiteful common soldier ultimately takes revenge against a king and queen who imprisoned him by having huge dogs rip them and their entire court to shreds before marrying the princess and becoming king himself.

      “It has nothing to do with being of moral stature,” Lübker says. “It’s all about power. If you have the dogs, people will say ‘of course you can be king, you have the power.’”

      Tatar says it’s possible to see the stories through many different lenses. When she taught Andersen’s work to students, she used to focus on the disciplinary aspects of his stories, in which characters often face terrible punishments for their misdeeds. “After class, there was always a group of three or four—they tended to be young women—who came up to me, and they said ‘but his fairy tales are so beautiful,’” she says.

      That led her to begin focusing her attention in a different way. For example, in “The Little Match Girl” from 1845, an impoverished, abused girl freezes to death on the street on New Year’s Eve. But, as she lights one match after another, she sees luminous visions of warm rooms, abundant food and her loving grandmother.

      “She is something of an artist in terms of giving us an inner world,” Tatar says. “I started to see that [Andersen] really gives us these moving pictures, and it’s not just their beauty that gets us hooked, I think, but also an ethic of empathy—we’re moved by these images. We start to care about them. And it makes us curious about the inner lives of his characters.”

      Kreditering Kengo Kuma and Associates, Cornelius Vöge, MASU planning (1).pngVisitors can look up at a glass ceiling through a pool of water and see people up in the garden.(Kengo Kuma and Associates, Cornelius Vöge, MASU planning)

      Lübker says the exhibits in the museum are designed to elicit that kind of engagement with the stories. In an area devoted to “The Little Mermaid,” visitors can look up at a glass ceiling through a pool of water and see people up in the garden, and the sky above them.

      “You can’t talk to them, because they’re separated from you,” Lübker says. “You can lie down on pillows on the floor and you can hear the mermaid’s sisters tell about the first time they were up there. We hope we can create this sense of longing for something else in the visitor.”

      Another part of the museum sets out to recreate the ominous ambiance of “The Shadow,” a fairy tale Andersen wrote in 1847 in which a good man’s evil shadow eventually replaces and destroys him. Visitors see what at first appears to be their shadows behaving just as they normally do, until they suddenly begin acting on their own. “I think it would ruin the experience if I went too much into detail,” says Lübker.

      “They’re very deep stories, and there are many layers to them,” Lübker adds. “Instead of just giving one interpretation, we want to create them in a sense where people can really feel something that is deeper and richer than what their memory of the story is.”

      Kreditering Odense Bys Museer (3).jpgThe project has a footprint of more than 95,000 square feet. (Odense Bys Museer)

      The museum’s architect, Kengo Kuma, known for designing Tokyo’s new National Stadium, built for the 2020 Summer Olympics (now scheduled to be held in 2021), shies away from the view of a building as an autonomous object, Lübker explains. “Architecture for him is kind of like music,” Lübker says. “It’s like a sequence: How you move through space, what you experience. It’s about that meeting between you and the architecture.”

      Plans for the museum go back to around 2010, when Odense decided to close off a main thoroughfare that previously divided the city center. The project’s large footprint currently contains the existing, much smaller, Hans Christian Andersen Museum, the Tinderbox Cultural Centre for Children, the building where Andersen was born and Lotzes Have, park themed after Andersen. The city chose Kuma’s firm, which is working together with Danish collaborators Cornelius+Vöge Architects, the MASU Planning Landscape Architects and Eduard Troelsgård Engineers, through a competitive process. In a separate competition, Event Communication of Britain was chosen to design the museum’s exhibitions.

      Hans Christian Andersen birthplaceAndersen's birthplace is situated within the museum. (Jörg Carstensen/picture alliance via Getty Images)

      The museum is situated with Andersen’s birthplace as its cornerstone so that visitors’ journeys will end in the room where he is said to have been born. It will also work to connect visitors to other Odense attractions related to Andersen, including his childhood home where he lived until moving to Copenhagen at age 14 to pursue his career in the arts. “Inspired by Boston’s Freedom Trail, we have physical footprints that allow you to walk in the footsteps of Andersen around the city from location to location,” says Lübker.

      Due to continuing pandemic-related travel restrictions, Lübker says, when the museum opens this summer, its first visitors may be mostly from within Denmark. But it expects to eventually draw guests from around the world thanks to Andersen’s global popularity.

      Hans Christian Andersen childhood homeThe storyteller's childhood home, where he lived until moving to Copenhagen at age 14 to pursue his career in the arts, is also in Odense. (Dea/B. Annebicque/Getty Images)

      Tatar notes that Andersen’s fairy tales have been translated into numerous languages and are very popular in China and across Asia, among other places. Artists have also reworked them into uncountable films, picture books and other forms over the decades. The Disney movie Frozen, for example, uses “The Snow Queen as the source material for a radically transformed story about sisterly love—which, in turn, has been claimed by LGBTQ and disabled communities as a celebration of openly embracing one’s unique qualities. “The core is still there, but it becomes something entirely new that is relevant to what we think about today,” Tatar says.

      At the time of Andersen’s death in 1875, the 70-year-old was an internationally recognized writer of iconic stories. But he couldn’t have known how fondly he would be remembered almost 150 years later.

      “He never lost the feeling that he was not appreciated enough,” Zipes says. “He would jump for joy to go back to Odense and see this marvelous museum that’s been created in his honor.”

      • April 10, 2022
      • (CDT)
      • April 10, 2023
      • (CDT)
      • 2 sessions

      A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - JOACHIM FERDINAND RICHARDT

      Joachim Ferdinand Richardt (10 April 1819 - 29 October 1895) was a Danish-American artist. In Denmark he is known for his lithographs of manor houses, and in the U.S. for his paintings of Niagara Falls and other landscapes.

      Ferdinand Richardt, the son of Johan Joachim Richardt and Johanne Frederikke née Bohse, was born in Brede, north of Copenhagen in 1819. His father ran the inn/company store at the Brede factory. In 1832 the family relocated to nearby Ørholm to operate the inn at the paper-factory there. In 1839, they moved to Copenhagen.

      Richardt became briefly a carpenter's apprentice in 1835, but soon decided on a career in fine art, following the lead of his brother Carl. Beginning in 1836 Richardt studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Art under the architect and designer Gustav Friedrich Hetsch, the historical painter J. L. Lund and the classical sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen. Richardt was awarded the Academy's small and large silver medals in 1839 and 1840, respectively.

      In 1847, he received a five-year stipend from the crown, on the condition that he deliver one architectural and one landscape painting each year to the royal collection. Between 1855 and 1859 he visited in the United States. He maintained a studio in New York City, while traveling during the summers to Niagara Falls and to various destinations east of the Mississippi River.

      After returning to Denmark, Richardt married the widow Sophia Schneider née Linnemann (1831-1888) in 1862. They traveled for part of a year in southern Europe, and from 1863 they lived for a period in England. In February 1864, Queen Victoria invited Richardt to display his art work to the court at Windsor Castle.

      Image - The Golden Gate Moonlight

      In 1872 and 1873, Richardt sold many of his accumulated paintings and lithographs before emigrating to the United States with his family. They lived first in the town of Niagara Falls, N.Y. where the artist again produced canvases depicting the great waterfall and the surrounding area. In 1875, the Richardts moved to San Francisco, and finally in 1876 to Oakland. For the remaining twenty years of his life Richardt was active as a painter of California landscapes with a concentration on the San Francisco Bay Area. He exhibited and sold his works in San Francisco until at least 1887. At the same time he taught drawing privately.

      He died during 1895 in Oakland, California. At his death, Richardt left a daughter, Johanna (1862-1897), and a stepson, Joost Schneider.

      • Richardt created hundreds of oil paintings, mostly of landscapes, castles, manors, and various tourist attractions. He was a recognized painter in his own lifetime. Today, his paintings are held and exhibited by museums and other public institutions in the United States and Denmark; two hang in The White House, Washington, D.C.
      • Richardt's 1856 painting Niagara Falls was chosen to be the backdrop for the customary luncheon following the Second inauguration of Barack Obama in Statuary Hall. New York Senator Charles Schumer, the Chair of the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, stated why he chose the painting: "For me as a New Yorker, Niagara Falls never fails to inspire a tremendous awe for the natural beauty of our great country. Then and now, the mighty falls symbolize the grandeur, power and possibility of America."  Image - Niagra Falls

      During the 1840s, 50s and 60s, Richardt travelled in Denmark and Sweden, and made numerous drawings of manor houses and estates. These were lithographed with the best techniques of the time, and published along with descriptions by well-known historians in the books:

      • Views of Danish Manors (Prospecter af danske Herregaarde), 80 portfolios 1844-68 showing a total of 240 manor houses. Republished with condensed text in 1976.
      • Danish Churches, Castles, Manors and Memorials (Danske Kirker, Slotte, Herregaarde og Mindesmærker), 12 portfolios 1867-68 with a total of 56 pictures.
      • Scanian Manors (Skånska herregårdar), 24 portfolios 1852-63, with a total of 78 pictures.
      • Manors in Södermanland (Herregårdar uti Södermanland), 12 portfolios 1864-69 with a total of 57 pictures, some in color.
      Image - Mt Vernon

      Richardt drew a vast number of pictures besides those published. These served as studies for his hundreds of oil paintings and for other print works. At his death, more than 1,000 Danish and American drawings passed to his daughter, and later to his stepson. The drawings were considered to be lost, until the 1990s when American scholar and cultural historian Melinda Young Stuart located them in the possession of Justine van Hemert Keller, the grandchild of Richardt's stepson. Over 500 of the original drawings, on which Richardt's paintings and lithographs were based, are preserved in the archives of Denmark's Nationalmuseet, a gift of the artist's great-granddaughter. Other drawings are held at the Oakland Museum of California, the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, and elsewhere.

      In 2003, more than 100 of the newly found drawings were reproduced, along with other works by Richardt in the book Danish Manorhouses and America (see below). A copy of this book was presented as a gift by the Danish prime minister's wife to the American First Lady when she came to Copenhagen on an official visit.

      In 2007, 55 of Richardt's American drawings were exhibited at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute; a catalogue was published (see below). The exhibit later traveled to the Grand Rapids Art Museum where it was on view during the summer of 2008. -Wikipedia

      • April 16, 2022
      • (CDT)
      • April 16, 2023
      • (CDT)
      • 2 sessions
      • Fredensborg Palace, Denmark

      A ROYAL BIRTHDAY
      HM QUEEN MARGRETHE II


      From The Royal Danish House website - Once again this year, Her Majesty The Queen’s birthday on 16 April will be marked differently than usual. Like last year, The Queen will spend the day at Fredensborg Palace, where the birthday will be celebrated privately.

      When Her Majesty The Queen turned 80 years old almost a year ago, the day turned out to be different than planned. In light of the situation with COVID-19 in the Danish society, the round birthday was celebrated at Fredensborg Palace with digital congratulations from inside Denmark and abroad, joint singing and Her Majesty’s address to the Danish people in the evening. One year later, the situation with COVID-19 continues to mean that The Queen’s birthday must be celebrated differently than the traditional way. Her Majesty and the royal family will therefore not come out on the balcony during the changing of the guard at Amalienborg at 12:00 noon this year. Instead, The Queen will celebrate the day privately at Fredensborg Palace.  

      However, it will still be possible to send The Queen a birthday greeting via the Royal Danish House’s digital platforms. On the morning of 16 April, a congratulations list will be set up on the Royal Danish House’s website, where it will be possible to send personal felicitations to The Queen. Due to the continued spread of COVID-19, it will not be possible to show up physically at Det Gule Palæ at Amalienborg to handwrite a greeting for Her Majesty. The birthday will be marked throughout the day on the Royal Danish House’s social media and website. 

      ---------------------------

      Margrethe Alexandrine Þorhildur Ingrid, Her Majesty The Queen, became Queen of Denmark in 1972. Margrethe II was born on 16 April 1940 at Amalienborg Palace as the daughter of King Frederik IX (d. 1972) and Queen Ingrid, born Princess of Sweden (d. 2000)

      Foto: Per Morten Abrahamsen

      The Queen’s motto is "God’s help, the love of The People, Denmark’s strength".

      The Royal Family comprises Her Majesty The Queen’s relatives, including HRH Princess Benedikte and Her Majesty Queen Anne-Marie.

      Christening and confirmation:  HM The Queen was christened on 14 May 1940 in Holmens Kirke (the Naval Church) and confirmed on 1 April 1955 at Fredensborg Palace.

      The Act of Succession:  The Act of Succession of 27 March 1953 gave women the right of succession to the Danish throne but only secondarily. On the occasion of her accession to the throne on 14 January 1972, HM Queen Margrethe II became the first Danish Sovereign under the new Act of Succession.  In 2009, The Act of Succession was amended so that the eldest child (regardless of gender) succeeds to the throne.

      A seat on the State Council:  On 16 April 1958, the Heir Apparent, Princess Margrethe, was given a seat on the State Council, and she subsequently chaired the meetings of the State Council in the absence of King Frederik IX.

      Wedding:  On 10 June 1967, the Heir Apparent married Henri Marie Jean André, Count of Laborde de Monpezat, who in connection with the marriage became Prince Henrik of Denmark. The wedding ceremony took place in Holmens Kirke, and the wedding festivities were held at Fredensborg Palace. Prince Henrik passed away on 13 February 2018.

      Children:  HRH Crown Prince Frederik André Henrik Christian, born 26 May 1968, and HRH Prince Joachim Holger Waldemar Christian, born 7 June 1969.

      2020 Birthday Address to the Public:
      English Translation
      April 16, 2020

      More Information:

      Royal House Website

      • April 17, 2022
      • (CDT)
      • April 20, 2025
      • (CDT)
      • 4 sessions

      GOD PÅSKE (EASTER SUNDAY)

      Easter, also called Påske (Danish) or Resurrection Sunday, is a festival and holiday commemorating the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, described in the New Testament as having occurred on the third day after his burial following his crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary c. 30 AD. It is the culmination of the Passion of Jesus, preceded by Lent (or Great Lent), a 40-day period of fasting, prayer, and penance.

      Most Christians refer to the week before Easter as "Holy Week", which contains the days of the Easter Triduum, including Maundy Thursday, commemorating the Maundy and Last Supper, as well as Good Friday, commemorating the crucifixion and death of Jesus. In Western ChristianityEastertide, or the Easter Season, begins on Easter Sunday and lasts seven weeks, ending with the coming of the 50th day, Pentecost Sunday. In Eastern Christianity, the season of Pascha begins on Pascha and ends with the coming of the 40th day, the Feast of the Ascension.

      Easter and the holidays that are related to it are moveable feasts which do not fall on a fixed date in the Gregorian or Julian calendars which follow only the cycle of the Sun; rather, its date is offset from the date of Passover and is therefore calculated based on a lunisolar calendar similar to the Hebrew calendar. The First Council of Nicaea (325) established two rules, independence of the Jewish calendar and worldwide uniformity, which were the only rules for Easter explicitly laid down by the council. No details for the computation were specified; these were worked out in practice, a process that took centuries and generated a number of controversies. It has come to be the first Sunday after the ecclesiastical full moon that occurs on or soonest after 21 March. Even if calculated on the basis of the more accurate Gregorian calendar, the date of that full moon sometimes differs from that of the astronomical first full moon after the March equinox.

      Easter is linked to the Jewish Passover by much of its symbolism, as well as by its position in the calendar. In most European languages the feast is called by the words for passover in those languages; and in the older English versions of the Bible the term Easter was the term used to translate passover.  Easter customs vary across the Christian world, and include sunrise services, exclaiming the Paschal greetingclipping the church, and decorating Easter eggs (symbols of the empty tomb). The Easter lily, a symbol of the resurrection, traditionally decorates the chancel area of churches on this day and for the rest of Eastertide.  Additional customs that have become associated with Easter and are observed by both Christians and some non-Christians include egg hunting, the Easter Bunny, and Easter parades. There are also various traditional Easter foods that vary regionally.

      Here's What You Need to Know About Danish Easter Traditions

      Aliki Seferou

      Danish traditions, Easter Eggs

      Danish traditions, Easter Eggs | © andreas160578 / Pixabay

      Easter is celebrated in different ways in countries all over the globe and so, Denmark has its own traditions. If you’re visiting the country this time of the year and want to be prepared or just want to get an idea of what Danes love to do when celebrating Easter, this guide has everything you need. Gækkebreve, a lot of food, snaps and chocolate eggs are some of the things that are never absent from the Danish Easter.

      Celebrating springtime

      During Easter, Danes celebrate mostly the arrival of springtime and with Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, Easter Sunday and Easter Monday being national holidays, they find Easter as a good opportunity for a short escape to their summer houses. It’s not very common for Danes to attend church during Easter and there aren’t any special religious events taking place during the holy week. So, don’t expect to see grandiose celebrations like the ones during Semana Santa in Seville or processions like Epitaphio that takes place in Greece on Good Friday.

      Danish countryside in spring | © Per Ganrot / Flickr

      Gækkebreve

      The weeks before Easter every child in Denmark that wants to get an extra Easter chocolate egg writes and sends gækkebrev. The senders of gækkebrevemust write a ‘teaser poem’ on a paper and then sign it with a number of dots equal to their names’ letters. Children are called to use their imagination and cut the paper into different shapes, include a snowdrop (vintergække), which is the first flower of the year, and make sure that their poem rhymes. If the recipient of the letter guesses who sent him the gækkebrev then the sender must give him an Easter chocolate egg and if not, then the other way around. Since usually the senders are children and the recipients are adults, it’s an unwritten rule and almost part of the tradition that the receivers never manage to guess the person behind the ‘fool’s letter’.

      Danish Easter tradition,Gækkebreve | © Nillerdk / Wikimedia Commons

      Eggs, eggs and eggs

      Eggs are part of Easter traditions in many countries and Denmark is no exception. Many houses are decorated with fake yellow or green eggs while chocolate eggs and boiled chicken’s eggs dyed in different colours never miss from the Easter lunch table. Many Danes hide chocolate eggs in their gardens for children to find on Easter Sunday, keeping a tradition that dates back to the early 2oth century alive.

      Tivoli Easter Eggs Decoration | © David Jones / Flickr

      Easter lunch

      Celebrating without a big table filled with delicacies, beer and snaps it’s not a proper celebration for Danes regardless the time of the year. For the Sunday Easter lunch, locals prepare lamb, boiled eggs, herring and other kinds of fish such as salmon. The special Easter beer, which is brewed only this time of the year, is, according to beer specialists, heavier and tastier than common beers so it’s a must to have it on the festive table. Finally, even though Easter lunch starts from early afternoon, all guests have to drink at least one traditional Danish snap. The high-levelled alcohol spirits must be drunk in one gulp after everyone has raised their glasses, yelling, “Skål” and Easter wishes.

      Danish Easter lunch | © Andreas Hagerman / Flickr



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