event Calendar

Eastern United States (East coast states)

    • October 31, 2020
    • (EDT)
    • November 01, 2020
    • (EDT)

    FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS FOR AMERICANS TO STUDY IN SCANDINAVIA

    Deadline: November 1, 2020

    New York, NY—The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications for Fellowships & Grants for Americans to Study in Scandinavia during the 2021-22 academic year.

    ASF offers both year-long fellowships of up to $23,000 and short-term (1-3 month) grants of up to $5,000 to graduate students (preferably dissertation-related) and academic professionals interested in pursuing research or creative arts projects in the Nordic region. Awards are made in all fields.

    For further information and to begin an online application, please click here!

    Deadline: November 1, 2020

    For email inquiries, please contact grants@amscan.org.

    The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) promotes firsthand exchange of intellectual and creative influence between the United States and the Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. A publicly supported American nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, ASF has an extensive program of fellowships, grants, intern/trainee sponsorship, publishing, and cultural activities. Headquartered in New York City, ASF has members throughout the United States, and alumni and donors worldwide. For more information, visit amscan.org.

    • October 31, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • September 30, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • Online - The Danish American Archive and Library - Blair, NE

    NEW VIRTUAL EXHIBIT - SPREADING "THE WORD": THE DANA COLLEGE THEATER TROUPE TOUR OF 1942

    The Danish American Archive and Library in Blair, Nebraska, presents its first stand-alone online exhibit: Spreading “The Word”: The Dana College Theater Troupe Tour of 1942. The exhibit tells the story of a group of students at the now-defunct Dana College who went on tour to 12 Midwestern Danish American communities in six states. The students performed a play in the original Danish language by the acclaimed Danish playwright Kaj Munk, who two years later was assassinated by German Nazis. Dana College had strong Danish roots, and the exhibit also highlights how WWII and the German occupation of Denmark impacted the students.

    View The Exhibit

    Photos: Copyright and courtesy of The Danish American Archive and Library - Blair, NE

    The world and the Danish American Archive and Library also face a challenge today. “During the Corona epidemic, we haven’t been able to welcome visitors to the archive as we usually do but with this online exhibit we hope to reach a wide audience – both locally and farther afield,” says Jill Hennick, the Danish American Archive and Library’s Executive Director. The archive has over 1,400 cubic feet of documents about Danish American lives and nearly 14,000 books in its library. “This exhibit will have a wide-ranging appeal to anyone interested in our country’s immigration history, the Scandinavian aspect of the Midwest, or WWII,” says Hennick.

    Through photos, letters and lively excerpts from a student diary, the exhibit provides insight into the troupe’s stops in 12 Danish American communities: Omaha, Nebraska; Kimballton, Des Moines, Cedar Falls, Hampton and Ringsted in Iowa; Chicago, Illinois; Racine, Wisconsin; Askov, Minneapolis and Evan in Minnesota; and Viborg, South Dakota. As shown in the exhibit, in many of these locations, residents as well as visitors can still find traces of Danish history, culture, language and cuisine.

    The Dana College drama troupe tour was led by Professor Paul Nyholm, a first-generation Danish immigrant pastor who later received a medal for his support of Denmark during the German occupation. The purpose of the tour was to create unity among Danish Americans, keep the Danish language alive, spread knowledge of Kaj Munk and his play, and encourage a strong faith in God.

    “Ultimately, the students’ performance was seen by 2,000 people but this theater troupe tour – the first in Dana’s history – was a big undertaking for the students and the director,” says Hennick, who lists several reasons: The student actors were second- and third-generation Danish immigrants who needed to learn the lines in a language that few, if any, of them spoke fluently. The Danish American communities were declining – by the 1940s, there were relatively few people who understood Danish, so gathering a local audience for a performance in that language was quite a feat. Added to that, Kaj Munk was somewhat controversial, and his play about faith and miracles is a serious dramatic play that might not appeal to everyone.

    Online internship

    The online exhibit was created working with a graduate history student from American Public University – a Danish American herself – who conducted her public history practicum remotely from South Carolina. “This is our first completely online intern – it’s one of the ways that we are adapting to the Corona epidemic but hosting an online internship also enables us to work with students from a wider geographical area,” says Jill Hennick. The archive has previously worked with ten interns from four different universities. Hennick says: “Being a research library, we find it ideal to work with interns who bring the items in our collection to life.”

    About the archive

    The Danish American Archive and Library in Blair, Nebraska, is dedicated to preserving and sharing Danish American history. It grew out of the archives of Dana College and the United Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church. Since 2010, when Dana College closed, the archive has been an independent non-profit institution. Its mission is to collect, catalog, preserve and make available to the public its vast holdings of documents, photos and other media that show the history and contributions to American life of Danish Americans. The archive is located at 1738 Washington Street in Blair and is open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday by appointment only. To find out more about the archive and for a detailed list of the collections, go to danishamericanarchive.com or call 402-426-7910.

    View the new online exhibit at dana1942theword.org.

    • October 31, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • October 31, 2024
    • (CDT)
    • 5 sessions

    HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

    Autumn Images from Tivoli

    (Photos by NFDA Officer Katrine Vange)

    Halloween, contraction of All Hallows’ Eve, a holiday observed on October 31, the evening before All Saints’ (or All Hallows’) Day. The celebration marks the day before the Western Christian feast of All Saints and initiates the season of Allhallowtide, which lasts three days and concludes with All Souls’ Day. In much of Europe and most of North America, observance of Halloween is largely nonreligious. - Britannica

    Pumpkins and ghosts have captured the imagination of Danish kids, leaving the barrel-smashing, cat-liberating February fancy dress fest of Fastelavn behind.

    Although Halloween is generally considered a tradition with American origins, it’s actually European, and is thought to have its roots in Celtic customs up to 2,000 years old.

    In Ireland, offers were made to Celtic gods and the dead, and scary-looking lamps were carved out of beets – setting the tradition for today’s pumpkins.

    Conversion to Christianity later saw the Celtic tradition combined with All Saints Day – the result was Hallow’s Evening or Hallowe’en.

    The tradition was largely imported to the United States by Irish immigrants in the 19thcentury.

    Although Halloween is one of the biggest annual celebrations in the US, it has been slow to catch on in many European countries which celebrate All Saints Day – or in the case of the United Kingdom, Guy Fawkes’ Night – at the same time of year.

    That has also been the case in Denmark. Although the country does not have a tradition for celebrating All Saints Day due to the predominance of the Lutheran Church of Denmark, kids have traditionally had the chance to dress up and win sweet-tasting treats in February, during Fastelavn.

    As such,Halloween did not really register in Denmark until around the turn of the century.

    In 1999, toy store chain Fætter BR began selling Halloween costumes, contemporary reports from broadcaster DR show.

    Almost half of all families with children in Denmark now buy sweets or candy at Halloween, according to DR.

    That has given a boost to the country’s pumpkin farmers, who have seen sales double over the last ten years.

    "Trick or treat" has now been rendered as the somewhat clunky, and no less aggressive, ‘slik eller trylleri, ellers er dit liv forbi’ (‘candy or magic, or your life is over!) and can be heard on Danish doorsteps on October 31st.

    More people in Denmark now purchase fancy dress costumes for Halloween than they do for Fastelavn, according to sales figures from supermarket company Coop reported by DR.

    Coop's sales of fancy dress costumes for Fastelavn have been on a downward curve at since 2011, and were overtaken by sales for Halloween in 2007.

    Last year saw Coop sell three times as many costumes for Halloween compared to Fastelavn, DR reports.

    General enthusiasm for and pervasion of American culture in Denmark are no small part of the explanation for the trend, according to DR, which notes that Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day have also been successfully transplanted into the Danish calendar.

    Halloween’s timing also benefits stores, which can sell items for the day at a time of the year when a lack of other events makes it ideal for promotion. - From "The Local" DK


    • October 31, 2020
    • (CDT)
    • October 31, 2022
    • (CDT)
    • 3 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - PETER LASSEN

    Peter Lassen (31 Oct 1800 - 26 April 1859) born in Farum (Copenhagen), Denmark in 1800, is the namesake for both Lassen County and Lassen Volcanic National Park. He was a blacksmith by trade and characterized the “old pioneer” spirit and explorations of the Wild West. (Historical records differ on his specific birth date.)

    Lassen began his life in America in Boston, moved to Philadelphia and Missouri as he continued westward, eventually reaching Oregon, Fort Ross and Bodega Bay. He traveled south to Sutter’s Fort in Sacramento, where he was appointed to a posse to look for horses stolen from Sutter’s Ranch.

    When Lassen arrived at the confluence of the Sacramento River and Deer Creek, he was so impressed with the country side, he obtained the required Mexican citizenship so he could purchase 22,000 acres at Deer Creek. In 1845 he established the Bosuejo Ranch and then returned to Missouri to bring people to live there. The emigrants in his group were the first to cross the Lassen Trail.

    He established Benton City, also known as Lassen Ranch. He built Adobe buildings, a blacksmith shop and a store. Benton City became one of the most important sites in Northern California at the time. It was a residence for Colonel Fremont in 1846, for he and 60 of his men.

    Lassen later sold and divided his property holdings between two men and went prospecting for gold. Lassen found gold in 1855 in Honey Lake Valley and held many leadership positions. One of his many roles was president of the Nataqua Territory and surveyor. He was friends with several Native American tribes. He and his party built a cabin for the winter. The cabin burned down in 1896 and was not replaced.

    Lassen continued to search for additional locations for prospecting. He discovered a silver mine near Black Rock Dessert in Nevada. He organized a scouting party of two groups to meet at Black Rock Canyon. The day after he and his two traveling companions, Edward Clapper and Lemericus Wyatt, arrived at the site in April of 1859, Lassen and Clapper were shot and killed. Speculation remains if the shot was indeed fired by a Native American or a member of his own scouting party. Native Americans are attributed for their deaths on the Lassen Monument. Wyatt escaped being shot and rode 124 miles to Susanville to share the tragic news.

    A scouting party was able to recover Lassen’s body, but not Clapper’s. Area residents erected a monument to Lassen to recognize him for the many good deeds of his lifetime. He is buried under the Ponderosa pine tree he camped his first night in the Honey Lake Valley. The original monument burned in 1917 and was replaced with the current one.

    According to historic documents, Clapper’s body was recovered in May 1990 by rock hunters in the Black Rock Desert. They found a skull and upper body skeleton that was determined to be the remains of Edward Clapper. In May of 1992, his remains were placed at the Lassen Monument located on Wingfield Road, just south of Susanville.

    Lassen County

    High in the northeastern Sierra is Lassen County, where volcanic activity has shaped the landscape. Peter Lassen, a Danish immigrant, came to Oregon in 1839 and later settled in the northern Sacramento Valley. He returned to Missouri and led a 12-wagon emigrant train along “Lassen Emigrant Trail” in 1848 into California. - Wikipedia


    • November 01, 2020
    • (EST)
    • December 20, 2020
    • (EST)
    • 7 sessions
    • Danish Seamen’s Church - Brooklyn, NY

    11:00AM SUNDAY SERVICE

    The Sunday service follows the same liturgy as in the Danish folkekirke. The service is held in Danish, we sing hymns from the Danish hymnal, have readings from the Bible and celebrate communion.

    Join us for coffee after worship.

    No service on the last Sunday of each month.

    Danish Seamen’s Church
    102 Willow St
    Brooklyn, NY  11201


    Telephone - (718) 875-0042 
    Emailinfo@dskny.org

    Church Website

    Church Facebook

    • November 03, 2020
    • (CST)
    • November 03, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • 2 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - JOHN "SPIDER" JORGENSEN

    On April 15, 1947, in Brooklyn, New York, an African American player took the field in a major-league baseball game for the first time in the modern baseball era. In descriptions of Jackie Robinson’s arrival, there is rarely mention of another rookie who debuted for the Brooklyn Dodgers that afternoon, a third baseman who batted seventh and wore number 21, Spider Jorgensen.

    John Donald Jorgensen was born on November 3, 1919, in Folsom, California, near Sacramento. He was the seventh child (along with two sisters and four brothers) of Walter and Winifred (Carney) Jorgensen. Walter, the son of a Danish-born father and Irish-American mother, was a California-born dredge operator in the Sacramento River delta. Winifred, also born in California, was the daughter of Irish immigrants. There is little documentation regarding Jorgensen’s early life or scholastic athletic career. At Folsom High School, from which he graduated in 1936, John acquired the nickname Spider. In the June 1998 issue of Baseball Digest, sportswriter Phil Elderkin wrote that the nickname came from a pair of black shorts with an orange stripe down the side that Jorgensen wore playing basketball. “The weekend before, a teacher had been cleaning out a woodshed and had to kill a black widow spider,” Jorgensen related. “When he saw me, he told everyone I reminded him of the spider.”

    A proposed scholarship to study business at the University of Santa Clara fell through, consequently Jorgensen spent two years at various jobs in Sacramento and playing baseball in the semipro Sacramento Winter League. In 1939, and again in 1941, he played baseball at Sacramento City College. A second baseman when he entered college, he was moved to third base when the team’s regular third baseman was injured. 

    In 1940 Jorgensen participated in a Dodgers’ tryout camp run by scout Tom Downey in San Mateo, California. He performed well enough that, in 1941, after he had finished at Sacramento City College, scouts Downey and Bill Svilich persuaded him to sign a contract with Brooklyn. The twenty-one-year-old left-handed-hitting infielder was assigned to the Dodgers’ Santa Barbara team in the Class C California League. There, in his first pro season, Jorgensen appeared in 140 games and batted .332 with nine home runs and forty-three doubles. He also made forty-eight errors at third base, but still was named the league’s Most Valuable Player as Santa Barbara won the league championship.

    The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor put Jorgensen’s career on a four-year hold. On February 17, 1942 he enlisted in the US Army. He was assigned to the Army Air Corps, and during the war reached the rank of technical sergeant, while serving at duty stations in Idaho, Arizona, and Texas. In Texas he met Lenore Jones and married her in October 1946. In addition to Lenore’s two children from a previous marriage, the couple had a daughter, Jonel. Spider and Lenore remained married until her passing in 1995.

    Jorgensen was discharged in 1945, and in 1946 he reported to the Class AAA Montreal Royals, the Dodgers’ affiliate in the International League. At Montreal Spider became part of an infield that included Jackie Robinson at second, and future Dodgers general manager Al Campanis at shortstop. Jorgensen hit .293 in 117 games with the Royals.

    After spring training in Cuba in 1947, Jorgensen assumed he was heading back to Montreal. But injuries to veteran infielders Cookie Lavagetto and Arky Vaughan forced the Dodgers to keep him. Jorgensen told writer Phil Elderkin, “I came into Ebbets Field on Opening Day, scared to death. I didn’t think I was going to play. I didn’t have any equipment with me. My glove, bats, everything else went to Syracuse because the Montreal club opened up there. Then Jackie comes over and says ‘Here, use my second base glove.’ He was going to play first base. So I used his glove and borrowed a pair of spikes and I’m in the lineup. So I really didn’t have time to get nervous.” 

    Spider logged a walk and an RBI in three at-bats that day. Two days later, on April 17, he had what proved to be one of his best days in the majors, driving in six runs on a home run and two doubles. In the twenty-seven-year-old rookie’s only major-league season as a regular, he played 128 games at third base and hit .274, with twenty-nine doubles and eight triples. Dan Daniel, writing in the August 13 edition of The Sporting News, called him the “best of the hot corner rookies.” Jorgensen played in all seven games in the World Series loss to the Yankees that fall, getting four hits with three runs batted in. 

    During the winter the five-feet-nine, 155-pound Jorgensen bruised his arm—due to the recoil from a hunting rifle—and then damaged it permanently by throwing too aggressively in spring training. In April manager Leo Durocher told The Sporting News not to be surprised if Jorgensen was his starting third baseman again in 1948. But, most likely due to the sore arm, Jorgensen started the season as a reserve and was replaced at third base by the newly-acquired Billy Cox. 

    Jorgensen was left in St Louis on June 5 after a series with the Cardinals for further testing of his arm and shoulder. He did not get into any more games and within two weeks the Dodgers sent him to their American Association farm team in St. Paul. It was the beginning of the end of Jorgensen’s major-league career. While he had hit .300 in thirty-one Dodgers games in 1948, he appeared in only 107 major-league games after that season.

    Spider was a Dodgers reserve in 1949, and he played in his second World Series that fall, hitting just .182 (2-for-11) with two doubles. On May 17, 1950, after appearing in only two games, the Dodgers sold Jorgensen to the New York Giants for what The Sporting News described as likely well over the $10,000 waiver price. The thirty-year-old infielder played in twenty-four games for the Giants with five hits in thirty-seven at-bats. He also played in sixty-four games for the Class AAA Minneapolis Millers, batting .330 in 215 at-bats. 

    Spider played his final game in the majors on June 30, 1951, flying out as a pinch-hitter. The next day the Giants traded Jorgensen, hitting just .235, and pitcher Red Hardy to the Oakland Oaks of the Pacific Coast League for outfielder Earl Rapp. 

    Between 1951 and 1955, Jorgensen played third base, shortstop, and the outfield for the Oaks under managers Mel Ott, Augie Galan, Charlie Dressen, and Lefty O’Doul. In 1956 the Oakland Oaks moved to Vancouver to become the Mounties, a Baltimore Orioles farm club. Spider continued to parlay his reliable defense and sufficient offensive skill into three more years of professional baseball. His regular playing career ended after the 1958 season, but the 39-year-old returned to the Dodgers family the next year as a spring-training mentor, and then coached for the Mounties during the season.

    His skill in dealing with younger players garnered positive attention, so in 1960 Spider was named player-manager (although he played in just four games) of the Dodgers’ Great Falls (Montana) Electrics in the Class C Pioneer League. The next season Jorgensen dropped a level to manage the Artesia (New Mexico) Dodgers of the Class D Sophomore League. That league was a purely instructional entity and Jorgensen remained at that level in 1962, shifting within the organization to the St. Petersburg Saints of the Florida State League.

    After the 1962 season with St. Petersburg, Jorgensen left professional baseball and returned to his home in Sacramento. However, he could not stay away from the sport. Although unpaid, he put his knowledge and experience to work coaching amateur baseball, serving as head coach of the Fair Oaks American Legion team, a squad that won the Legion North Division championship in 1967. Jorgensen may have had more raw talent on that Legion team than on any of the three minor-league teams he had managed, as the squad was led by future major-league star, Dusty Baker. In a 2004 book, How To Be Like Jackie Robinson, Baker, by then manager of the Chicago Cubs, was quoted as saying, “In all the time he coached us, I never knew Spider played for the Dodgers. I knew he was a terrific coach, but he never once mentioned he was a former player.”

    In 1969 Jorgensen returned to professional baseball as a scout and spring-training instructor for the Kansas City Royals. As a scout, he was directly responsible for signing future major leaguers Greg Minton, Doug Bird, and John Wathan. He also had a stint of sixty-nine games managing the Royals’ Winnipeg Goldeyes in the short-season Northern League. 

    After Kansas City Jorgensen scouted for the Philadelphia Phillies for a few years, and found pitcher Bob Walk, among others. As a scout for the Chicago Cubs, he persuaded the team to draft Mark Grace, who proved to be one of the finest hitters of the 1990s.

    Years later, in an obituary written by Jim Gazzolo, others commented on Spider’s scouting ability and on his character. “I don’t think there is a person in the world who didn’t love him,” Ontario High baseball coach Bob Beck told Gazzolo. “To my knowledge, he didn’t have an enemy in the world. He had an unassuming manner about himself. He was just very friendly, accommodating, but he didn’t miss a trick. He always knew what was going on.”

    In 1996 Jorgensen was a member of the first group of inductees into the Sacramento City College Athletic Hall of Fame. A baseball man to the end, Jorgensen was still scouting locally for the Cubs when he died on November 6, 2003, at San Antonio Hospital in Rancho Cucamonga, California, three days after his eighty-fourth birthday. He is inurned at Lakeside Memorial Lawn Cemetery in Folsom, California.  -  Bill Johnson


    • November 10, 2020
    • (CST)
    • November 10, 2024
    • (CST)
    • 5 sessions

    MORTENSAFTEN

    Sankt Morten is the Danish name of Saint Martin of Tours. According to legend, Martin was forced to become a bishop by his parishioners and tried to hide in a barn. However, the noise of the geese gave him away. For this reason, but probably in reality because of the goose slaughtering season, it is tradition to eat a goose dinner, although over time duck has become a more practical dish on this occasion.

    In Denmark, Mortensaften, meaning the evening of St. Martin, is celebrated with traditional dinners, while the day itself is rarely recognized. (Morten is the Danish vernacular form of Martin.) The background is the same legend as mentioned above, but nowadays the goose is most often replaced with a duck due to size, taste and/or cost.








    Mortensaften Youtube Video

    • November 11, 2020
    • 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM (EST)
    • Virtual Event - DACC New York

    NORDIC SERIES 2020: UN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND THE DECADE OF ACTION

    For this last Nordic Series event of the year, we have invited as panelists the five Nordic permanent representatives to the UN and five major Nordics corporations to give their thoughts on the status of their incredibly important work related to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

    The United Nations vision to end poverty, rescue the planet, and build a peaceful world are solidly embedded in the 2015 UN SDG vision for a sustainable world. And the Nordic countries have placed themselves at the forefront of this effort and are pursuing their "Build Back Better and Greener" blueprint. We are now 5 years down the road and that leaves the UN and their public and private partners only about a decade to deliver on their 2030 deadline. Their shared plan recognizes the pivotal role of private industry and the potential of private-public-partnerships in achieving common goals.


    The Danish representatives will be Ambassador Martin Bille Hermann, Permanent Representative of Denmark to the United Nations, and Justin Perrettson, Head of Global Engagements, Novozymes.

    Please join us November 11 at 9:00-10:30 a.m. (EST). We will be posting registration and other updates on our Events page as soon as they become available.

    The Nordic Series is a collaborative initiative between the five New York-based chambers of commerce of Norway, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, and Sweden.  

    DACC New York Website

    DACC New York Facebook


    • November 14, 2020
    • (EST)
    • December 13, 2020
    • (EST)
    • 13 sessions
    • Danish Seamen's Church - New York

    JULEMARKED - DANISH SEAMEN'S CHURCH

    Hours:
    Tuesday 2:00PM-5:00PM
    Thursdays 10:00AM-2:00PM
    Saturdays 11:00AM-5:00PM
    Sundays Noon-5:00PM

    WEBSHOP WITH CURBSIDE PICKUP Danish Christmas goods can be ordered online, after which we pack your order, which you can then pick up at the church in a day and time of your choice within the church's opening hours.

    PHYSICAL SHOP IN THE PARISH ROOM OF THE SEAMAN'S CHURCH There will be a physical store in the Parish Hall room of the Church of Seaman's Church, where you can do your Christmas shopping within opening hours. Opening hours are Tuesdays 14-17, Thursdays 10-14, Saturdays 11-17 and Sundays 12-17. There will currently only be 13 people in the shop at a time, but don't worry, we have ordered copious quantities of pork roast, liver pâté, Danish sweets, calendar lights, Christmas decorations, etc.

    CHRISTMAS HYGGE IN SØMANDSKIRKEN BAGGÅRD In addition to the physical store and webshop, we hope to open christmas fun in the backyard of The Seaman's Church, where we will serve æbleskiver and glögg to a limited number of guests at a time. It will be possible to book a reservation for this at a later date, so all of you who usually wish each other a happy Christmas at the church's Christmas market will also have that opportunity this year. 

    Danish Seamen's Church
    102 Willow St
    Brooklyn, NY. 11201

    Phone - 347-633-1176
    Email - JS@dskny.org

    Website

    Facebook


    • November 14, 2020
    • 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM (CST)
    • St Elizabeth's Church - Rockville, MD

    THE 57TH ANNUAL DANISH CHRISTMAS BAZAAR

    2020 Christmas Bazaar is Canceled

    We invite you to join us at the Annual Danish Christmas Bazaar. Enjoy an authentic Danish lunch of open-faced sandwiches and a day of Holiday shopping. You can find Danish Christmas Decorations, Danish Delicatessen, Greenery, Embroidery & Crafts, Danish Pastry & Cookies, Jewelry & China, and much more. 

    Visit the Bazaar page for more information.

    The Royal Danish Embassy
    The Danish Club of Washington D.C.

    THE ANNUAL DANISH 
    CHRISTMAS BAZAAR

    Saint Elizabeth's Church
    917 Montrose Road
    Rockville, MD

    DIRECTIONS

    The bazaar will be held at Saint Elizabeth's Church, 917 Montrose Road, Rockville, Maryland. From I-270, take exit 4A (Montrose Road). Go East on Montrose Road one mile. Saint Elizabeth's Church will be on the left. Parking is free.
    • November 15, 2020
    • (CST)
    • September 15, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • 9 sessions
    • Online - New Issue Available

    CHURCH AND LIFE - NEW ISSUE

    For more information and to Subscribe...

    Subscribe Here

    CHURCH AND LIFE: A BRIEF HISTORY

    by Thorvald Hansen

    Church and Life (originally, Kirke og Folk) was begun by the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church in 1952 as an exclusively Danish publication in line with its original purpose which was to serve the Danish readership of the church. Until the 1930s the official church paper had been Kirkelig Samler, but when this had been replaced by the English language publication, Lutheran Tidings, the Danish readers were served by a page called Kirkelig Samler in the Danish language Dannevirke, a privately owned weekly which was unofficially related to the church. When this publication ceased in1951, Danish news of the church was no longer available and this was missed, particularly by older readers. It was to fill this vacuum that the new Danish publication was begun.

    The first issues were distributed gratis to some 750 individuals who might be interested, but within a short time it became a subscription paper with some 1,000 subscribers. It was a 16 page paper issued twice monthly. When the Lutheran Church in America was born in 1963 and Lutheran Tidings ceased publication, some of the readers of that paper became subscribers to Church and Life. Today it has become an exclusively English language publication of 12 to l6 pages (depending on the material available) and is issued monthly. The subscription price is $20 per year. Gifts and memorials make up the shortfall, and the paper continues to function in the black. For its content the paper depends upon the voluntary contributions of a significant number of writers. The December issue is at least twice the normal size for Christmas .

    In 1983 the name was changed to Church and Life. This is not, nor was it intended to be, a translation of the Danish, but rather an indication that the church body out of which it grew was concerned also with this earthly life.

    Throughout its long history the paper has had six full time editors: Holger Strandskov, Paul Wikman, Michael Mikkelsen, Johannes Knudsen, and Thorvald Hansen. The present editor, Joy Ibsen, is the daughter of a former pastor in the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church.
    Currently the paper serves some 460 subscribers as a tie that binds them, not only to one another, but to the religious and social environment with which they have been familiar. This is not an exclusive group, nor are they guided by nostalgia, but one to which any and all who share similar values are more than welcome.


    Reference: Evangelical Lutheran Church in America


    • November 22, 2020
    • (EST)
    • November 22, 2021
    • (EST)
    • 2 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - SCARLETT JOHANSSON

    Scarlett Ingrid Johansson (Born November 22, 1984) is an American actress and singer. The world's highest-paid actress since 2018, she has made multiple appearances in the Forbes Celebrity 100. Her films have grossed over $14.3 billion worldwide, making Johansson the ninth-highest-grossing box office star of all time. She is the recipient of several accolades, including a Tony Award and a BAFTA Award, as well as nominations for two Academy Awards and five Golden Globe Awards.

    She was born in the New York City borough of Manhattan, on November 22, 1984. Her father, Karsten Olaf Johansson, is an architect originally from Copenhagen, Denmark. Her paternal grandfather, Ejner Johansson, was an art historian, screenwriter, and film director, and his father was Swedish. Scarlett's mother, Melanie Sloan, a New Yorker, has worked as a producer. She comes from an Ashkenazi Jewish family from Poland and Russia, originally surnamed Schlamberg, and Scarlett has described herself as Jewish. She has an older sister, Vanessa, also an actress; an older brother, Adrian; and a twin brother, Hunter.[9] Johansson also has an older half-brother, Christian, from her father's first marriage. She holds both American and Danish citizenship.

    Born on November 22, 1984, in New York City, actress Scarlett Johansson comes from a long line of creative artists. Her Danish grandfather worked as a screenwriter and director, and her mother worked as a producer.

    Johansson's interest in acting surfaced at an early age. When she was eight years old, she appeared in an off-Broadway production of Sophistry with Ethan Hawke. Johansson continued to seek out roles and decided to study at Manhattan's PCS, a private educational institution known for such famous acting alumni as Carrie FisherRita Moreno and Sarah Michelle Gellar. Musical theater was one of Johansson's passions, which she pursued at PCS. "I was one of those jazz-hands kids," she told Vogue.

    She began acting as a child, and her role in the movie The Horse Whisperer brought her critical acclaim at age 13. Her subsequent successes include Lost in TranslationGirl with a Pearl EarringThe Nanny DiariesVicky Cristina Barcelona, Hitchcock and the mega-hit The Avengers. Exploring other artistic avenues, Johansson released her first album in 2008 and the next year she made her Broadway debut. Following her contributions to Ghost in the ShellRough Night, Isle of Dogs and Avengers: Endgame, Johansson garnered Oscar nominations for her roles in Marriage Story and Jojo Rabbit.

    Johansson married Canadian actor Ryan Reynolds in September 2008, in a small ceremony in British Columbia, Canada. The couple purchased a home together in Los Angeles, but filed for divorce two years later, in December 2010.

    After her split from Reynolds, Johansson was romantically linked to actor Sean Penn for a time. The pair traveled to Mexico together and attended actress Reese Witherspoon's wedding in March 2011. Later that year Johansson found herself at the center of a scandal when nude photos taken on her cell phone were posted online by hackers. The FBI initiated an investigation to find the individuals behind the leak.

    A representative for Johansson confirmed in September 2013 that she had gotten engaged to journalist Romain Dauriac. On September 4, 2014, Johansson and Dauriac announced the birth of their baby daughter, Rose. The couple wed on October 1, 2014, in Philipsburg, Montana, though the public didn't get wind of the announcement until December. After more than two years of marriage, Johannson divorced Dauriac in September 2017.

    In May 2019, it was revealed that Johansson and SNL writer and "Weekend Update" host Colin Jost got engaged after two years of dating.

    During her school years, Johansson landed some acting roles, including her film debut in 1994's North with Elijah Wood. Her first leading part came two years later with Manny & Lo, an independent dramatic comedy. Johansson played the younger sister of a pregnant teenager, both of whom were in foster care. Her twin brother, Hunter, also made an appearance in the film.

    Johansson attracted critical attention with 1998's The Horse Whisperer, also starring Robert Redford and Kristin Scott Thomas. Her portrayal of a young amputee won over many fans, including the film's star and director. Redford commented on Johansson's remarkable maturity, saying that she was "13 going on 30." In 2001 the actress received even more positive attention from critics with her supporting role in Ghost World, despite its tepid box office success.

    After graduating Professional Children's School (PCS) in 2002, Johansson found herself as one of Hollywood's top up-and-coming actresses. She had two starring roles in 2003, both of which garnered her critical accolades. In Lost in Translation, she played a woman visiting Tokyo who forms an unlikely relationship with a much older man (played by Bill Murray). Johansson also gave an impressive performance as a servant girl who is painted by famed artist Johannes Vermeer (played by Colin Firth) in Girl with a Pearl Earring.

    Johansson took on a variety of projects after these early successes. She worked with director Brian De Palma on the 2006 crime thriller The Black Dahlia, and tried her hand at comedy with 2007's The Nanny Diaries. A frequent collaborator with director Woody Allen, Johansson has appeared in several of his films, including 2008's Vicky Cristina Barcelona, opposite Javier Bardem and Penelope Cruz

    Around this time, Johansson branched out into new territory when she joined forces with Pete Yorn for an album of duets, which were recorded in 2007. The pair finally released their collaborative efforts in 2009 with the album Break Up, and Johansson wrote several tracks for the recording. "I've been singing for my whole life. When I was a kid I wanted to be on Broadway," she told New York magazine. In 2008 Johansson released her first album, Anywhere I Lay My Head, which featured cover versions of songs by Tom Waits. The recording proved to be a critical and commercial disappointment.

    Johansson soon took on a new career challenge. In 2009 she made her Broadway debut in a revival of Arthur Miller's drama A View from the Bridge opposite Liev Schrieber. Johansson earned positive reviews for her convincing performance as Catherine, a teenage girl who is raised by her aunt and uncle. For her work on the show, Johansson won a Tony Award.

    Turning to big-budget fare, Johansson played the super agent Black Widow in Iron Man 2(2010) opposite Robert Downey, Jr. and Mickey Rourke. The action flick became one of the summer's big blockbusters and set the stage for her contributions to numerous films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

    Johansson next appeared as Black Widow in the box-office smash The Avengers (2012). The film also featured Downey as Iron Man, Chris Hemsworth as Thor and Chris Evans as Captain America. 

    Johansson continued holding down her high-profile role for a string of Marvel blockbusters, including Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014), Avengers: The Age of Ultron (2015), Avengers: Infinity War (2018) and Avengers: Endgame (2019). Her involvement in the franchise proved highly lucrative, fueling her rise to the top spot in Forbes' ranking of the world's highest-paid actresses in the summer of 2018.

    Johansson then prepared to fly solo with the scheduled April 2020 release of Black Widow.

    Johansson remained busy on screen outside of her commitments to Marvel. She co-starred in Cameron Crowe's dramatic comedy We Bought a Zoo with Matt Damon in 2011, and the following year she took on the character of real-life film star Janet Leigh in Hitchcock, which explores the life of director Alfred Hitchcock during the making of the horror classic Psycho.

    In 2013 Johansson lent her distinctive voice to Her, as an intelligent operating system that draws the affection of Joaquin Phoenix's lonely character. She went on to take a supporting role in Jon Favreau's dramatic comedy Chef (2014) and starred as the title character in Luc Besson's sci-fi thriller Lucy (2014). In 2016 she rejoined Favreau to voice the character of Kaa in The Jungle Book.

    ADVERTISING

    In 2017 Johansson starred an adaptation of Ghost in the Shell. The production was criticized for its whitewashed cast, as Johansson's character in the original anime was Japanese. That same year she returned to comedy, as part of the ensemble cast for Rough Night, and in 2018 she voiced one of the canines in Wes Anderson's stop-motion feature Isle of Dogs.

    In July 2018 Johansson found herself in the middle of another casting controversy when she was tapped to play transgender massage parlor owner Dante "Tex" Gill in Rub & Tug, from Ghost in the Shell director Rupert Sanders. After initially dismissing the concerns through a spokesperson, Johannson acknowledged the "insensitive" nature of her response and announced she was withdrawing from the film.

    Next up for the actress was a co-starring role in the well-received drama Marriage Story(2019), alongside Adam Driver. She then appeared in another controversial project, Taika Waititi's Jojo Rabbit (2019), as the mother of a 10-year-old boy in Nazi Germany who considers a goofy Adolf Hitler to be his imaginary best friend. Johansson scored a best actress Oscar nomination for the former role and a supporting actress nod for the latter, making her the 12th actor (male or female) to earn the double nominations in the same year. - Wikipedia


    • December 05, 2020
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM (CST)
    • DANE Archive & Museum - Edison, NJ

    JULEMARKED

    The Danish Home located at 855 New Durham Road, Edison, NJ is a Cultural & Heritage Center housing an archive and museum. 

    DANE offers a museum as well as genealogy research and is open to the public Tuesdays and Thursdays or by appointment. Information is available by calling 732- 287-6445, danenj@aol.com or visiting DANE website: http://sites.rootsweb. com/-njdane/. Information about events at the Danish Home available by calling 732-287-9855.

    DANE 2020 Schedule:

    • September 20 - Archive Work Day
    • October 18 - Archive Work Day
    • December 5 – Julemarked, 10 AM - 3 PM
    • December TBD – Julefest

    Nordøst is the official publication of DANE – Danish Archive North East.

    It is published a few times a year. DANE is a 501(c)(3) licensed non-profit organization.

    DANE Archive and Museum
    855 New Durham Road
    Edison, NJ 08817

    Telephone - 732-287-9855
    Email - danenj@aol.com

    Website

    • December 06, 2020
    • 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM (CST)
    • Russel Acton Folk Center - Berea, KY

    27TH DANISH AMERICAN YULE FEST

    At Russel Acton Folk Center.  Contact Sune Frederiksen for more information 859-248-0690

    Russel Acton Folk Center
    212 W Harrison St
    Berea, KY  40403

    Telephone - (859)248-0690
    sune.ky@icloud.com
    www.berea-folk-circle.org


    • December 11, 2020
    • 12:00 PM (EST)
    • Virtual Event - DACC New York

    DACC NEW YORK CHRISTMAS LUNCHEON 

    We have already been contacted by a number of members inquiring about our annual Christmas Luncheon. We are still debating how to conduct the event virtually as there is little-to-no chance that we can have it in person at the Harvard Club under the present circumstances. What is certain is the date and time when we will raise a glass with you: Friday, December 11 at noon. Hopefully with real aquavit and a virtual raffle. So, stay tuned!

    DACC New York Website

    DACC New York Facebook


    • December 24, 2020
    • (CST)
    • December 25, 2020
    • (CST)
    • Denmark and United States

    GLÆDELIG JUL!

    Christmas in Denmark embodies the spirit of joy and enthusiasm to the maximum. As December approaches, every house and street is lit up with colourful lights, so much so that it neutralizes the effect of a dull winter. Most Danes believe that Christmas is about carols and songs, the aroma of spruce, oranges and freshly baked cookies. One of the city's oldest traditions is being adorned with thousands of candles to create an atmosphere of warmth, togetherness, relaxation and love. Usually, every store and street is elaborately decorated with green, red or white paper hearts, since this is the Danish symbol during Christmas. Again, even houses and dinner tables are ornamented with lights and hearts. Christmas cookies and æbleskiver are made for both the children and adults. Read on to learn more about the customs and traditions of Christmas in Denmark. 

    Some people in Denmark give and receive extra Advent presents on the four Sundays of Advent.

    Different types of Advent candles and calendars are popular in Denmark. A Kalenderlys (calendar-candle) is an Advent candle and most people have one of these types of candles. A Pakkekalender (gift calendar) is also a fun way to countdown to Christmas Eve. There are 24 small gifts for the children in the calendar, one for each day until Christmas Eve.

    Julekalender (christmas calendar) is a television series with 24 episodes. One episode is shown each day in December with the last one being aired on Christmas Eve. The first Julekalender was shown on TV in Denmark in 1962. The two main Danish TV channels DR and TV2 both show different versions of Julekalender each year. The theme of the stories in the Julekalender normally follow a similar storyline, with someone trying to ruin Christmas and the main characters saving Christmas!

    As well as the TV series, both DR and TV2 produce paper advent calendars to go along with the stories! DR is the oldest TV channel in Denmark and it's paper calendar is called Børnenes U-landskalender (Children's U-Country Calendar) (goes to another site). It's been making the calendars for over 50 years and profits from the sale of the calendar go to help poor children in a developing country. The calendar made by TV2 is called julekalender and profits from that calendar go to help Julemærkefonden, a children's charity in Denmark.

    You can also support Julemærkefonden when you send Christmas Cards in Denmark. Every year a set of Christmas stamps/stickers/seals called julemærket are sold in December to help raise money for the charity. You use a normal postage stamp as well, the julemærket stickers just make the post look more Christmassy! You can out more about julemærket on https://www.julemaerket.dk (goes to another site)

    Christmas Parties are held from 1st November to 24th December where everyone has a good time! Making cakes and biscuits is popular in the time before Christmas. Gingerbread cookies and vanilla ones are often favorites.

    In Denmark most people go to a Church Service on Christmas Eve about 4.00pm to hear the Christmas sermon or talk. It's also an old, traditional custom to give animals a treat on Christmas Eve, so some people go for a walk in the park or woods and they might take some food to give the animals and birds. You might also go for a walk to give you an appetite for the Christmas meal!

    When they get home the main Christmas meal is eaten between 6.00pm and 8.00pm. It's served on a beautifully decorated table. Popular Christmas foods include roast duck, goose or pork. They are served with boiled and sweet potatoes, red cabbage, beetroot and cranberry jam/sauce.

    Most families have a 'ris á la mande' (a special kind of rice pudding, made of milk, rice, vanilla, almonds and whipped cream) for dessert. All but one of the almonds are chopped into pieces. The person who finds the whole almond gets a present called a Mandelgave (almond present). Traditionally the little present was a marzipan pig! Now a marzipan pig is still sometimes given, but it's also often something like sweets or a little toy.

    After the meal the lights on the Christmas Tree are lit, people might dance around the tree and sing carols. Then it's time for people to open their presents. The Christmas tree normally has a gold or silver star on the top and often has silver 'fairy hair' on it to make it glitter.

    On Christmas day people meet with their family and have a big lunch together with danish open-faced sandwiches on rye-bread.

    In Denmark, children believe that their presents are brought by the 'Julemanden' (which means 'Christmas Man' or 'Yule Man'). He looks very similar to Santa Claus and also travels with a sleigh and reindeer. He lives in Greenland, likes rice pudding and is helped by 'nisser' which are like elves.

    St. Lucia's Day (or St. Lucy's Day) is also celebrated on December 13th, although it's more famous for being celebrated in Denmark's neighbor, Sweden.

    In Danish Happy/Merry Christmas is 'Glædelig Jul'. Happy/Merry Christmas in lots more languages.

    • December 30, 2020
    • (CST)
    • December 30, 2021
    • (CST)
    • 2 sessions

    THIS DATE IN DANISH AMERICAN HISTORY - ØRSTED (OERSTED) MEDAL FOR PHYSICS

    This year (2020) it is 200 years since Denmark's H.C. Ørsted discovered electromagnetism!

    The world scientific event is marked all year long with the celebration HCØ2020, for which His Royal Highness the Crown Prince is a patron of.

    The Oersted Medal is named for Hans Christian Ørsted (1777-1851), a Danish physicist who, in the course of creating a demonstration for teaching his class, discovered that electric currents cause a magnetic field. This was a crucial step in establishing the theory of electromagnetism so important in building modern technology and modern physics. The award was established by AAPT (American Association of Physics Teachers) in December 1936 and is given annually to a person who has had outstanding, widespread, and lasting impact on the teaching of physics. Some previous Oersted award winners are John Winston Belcher, Karl Mamola, Dean Zollman, George F. Smoot, Mildred S. Dresselhaus, Carl Wieman, Lillian McDermott, Hans Bethe, Carl E. Sagan, Edward Purcell, and Richard Feynman.

    At the December 1934 meeting in Pittsburgh, an anonymous donor offered to finance for a period of three years an annual award (a medal and a certificate) for notable contributions to the teaching of physics. To take advantage of this offer, a committee composed of Thomas Cope (University of Pennsylvania), Homer Dodge, and David W. Cornelius (University of Chattanooga), was appointed to study the proposal and make recommendations the following year. This form of recognition was to become the Oersted Medal; the donor was later revealed to be Paul Klopsteg. The idea of naming the award for Oersted came from Frederic Palmer. Permission was granted by the Danish Royal Society, but considerable time was required for the design and preparation of the medal.

    The first award, announced at the annual meeting in late December 1936, was given posthumously to William S. Franklin (1867-1930). Franklin was described as a man of exuberant energy “who boasted that the teaching of physics was the greatest fun in the world.” He was known for his “frequent keen and clarifying comments” on papers presented at Physical Society meetings, and he wrote prolifically—25 volumes of textbooks, numerous research papers, many contributions on “Recent Advances in Physics” in School Science and Mathematics, and a popular volume of educational essays dealing with the beauties of nature. Much of his career had been spent at Lehigh University and MIT, and the Association placed bronze memorial tablets in the physics laboratories of both those institutions. His death had come in June 1930, the result of an automobile accident; otherwise, he surely would have taken a prominent role in the organization of AAPT.

    Historical work on Oersted was carried out by J. Rud Nielsen; his article on the subject appeared in the American Journal of Physics 7, 10 (1939). President Richtmyer was able to report to the AAPT Executive Committee at the end of 1938 that for the medal designed by Dieges and Clust, “the motif suggested by F. Palmer, Jr., viz: Oersted, scientist and teacher, discovering electromagnetism in the presence of his assembled pupils, has been developed into one face. Thanks to the assistance rendered by J. Rud Nielsen, the scene is believed to be highly authentic.” The 1937 medal was accepted by the daughter of E.H. Hall. A. Wilmer Duff was the recipient of the 1938 award. The Oersted presentation was first made during an AAPT business meeting, not as part of a joint ceremonial session.

    Hans Christian Ørsted often rendered Oersted in English; 14 August 1777 – 9 March 1851) was a Danish physicist and chemist who discovered that electric currents create magnetic fields, which was the first connection found between electricity and magnetism. Oersted's law and the oersted (Oe) are named after him.

    A leader of the Danish Golden Age, Ørsted was a close friend of Hans Christian Andersen and the brother of politician and jurist Anders Sandøe Ørsted, who served as Prime Minister of Denmarkfrom 1853 to 1854.

    Ørsted was born in Rudkøbing in 1777. As a young boy he developed an interest in science while working for his father, who owned the local pharmacy. He and his brother Anders received most of their early education through self-study at home, going to Copenhagen in 1793 to take entrance exams for the University of Copenhagen, where both brothers excelled academically. By 1796, Ørsted had been awarded honors for his papers in both aesthetics and physics. He earned his doctorate in 1799 for a dissertation based on the works of Kant entitled The Architectonics of Natural Metaphysics.

    In 1800, Alessandro Volta reported his invention of the voltaic pile, which inspired Ørsted to investigate the nature of electricity and to conduct his first electrical experiments. In 1801, Ørsted received a travel scholarship and public grant which enabled him to spend three years traveling across Europe. He toured science headquarters throughout the continent, including in Berlin and Paris.

    In Germany Ørsted met Johann Wilhelm Ritter, a physicist who believed there was a connection between electricity and magnetism. This idea made sense to Ørsted as he subscribed to Kantian thought regarding the unity of nature. Ørsted's conversations with Ritter drew him into the study of physics. He became a professor at the University of Copenhagenin 1806 and continued research on electric currents and acoustics. Under his guidance the university developed a comprehensive physics and chemistry program and established new laboratories.

    Ørsted welcomed William Christopher Zeise to his family home in autumn 1806. He granted Zeise a position as his lecturing assistant and took the young chemist under his tutelage. In 1812, Ørsted again visited Germany and France after publishing Videnskaben om Naturens Almindelige Love and Første Indledning til den Almindelige Naturlære (1811).

    Ørsted was the first modern thinker to explicitly describe and name the thought experiment. He used the Latin-German term Gedankenexperiment circa 1812 and the German term Gedankenversuch in 1820.

    Ørsted died in Copenhagen in 1851, aged 73, and was buried in the Assistens Cemetery. - Wikipedia

    • January 01, 2021
    • (CST)
    • January 01, 2025
    • (CST)
    • 5 sessions

    GODT NYTÅR!

    New Year’s Eve rituals exist in many parts of the world and Denmark is no different. Here’s a short guide to understanding some of the best-known traditions.

    The Queen Margrethe’s New Year’s Eve speech at 6pm signals the beginning of a long and festive night. It’s a live broadcast from the Queen’s office in Christian IX’s Palace at Amalienborg, an annual essential that first started with King Christian IX in the 1880s. The Queen takes this opportunity to summarize the year’s main political events, both global and local. The speech always concludes with a salute to the nation with the words “Gud bevare Danmark” (God preserve Denmark), which signals the time to begin the meal.

    Unlike the Christmas dishes consumed just a few days prior, the New Year’s Eve menu consists of boiled cod, served with home-made mustard sauce and all the trimmings. However, Danes are less traditionally bound to the food when it comes to New Year. So, many Danes prepare exotic and alternative specialities for their New Year’s dinner.

    For dessert, the famous Kransekake, a Danish invention from the 1700s. Like champagne, it is one of the fixed elements of New Year’s Eve. It’s a towering cake made from layer-upon-layer of marzipan rings. The cake’s turret-like shape promises happiness and wealth for the coming year.

    Just before midnight, many Danes gather in front of the television to watch a short movie in black and white from 1963 called “90-års fødselsgaden” (“Dinner for one”, also known as “The 90th Birthday”).

    At the midnight countdown, it is a tradition for everyone celebrating indoors to stand on a sofa or a chair and jump into the new year. It symbolizes the hope for better time/eases the transition and then everyone wishes each other a Happy New Year. At this point a choir performs the Danish anthem and the Danish Monarch song.

    Shortly afterwards, people gather in the streets to set off fireworks. Danes traditionally celebrate New Year with lots of fireworks. It was only around 1900 that fireworks began to become something that ordinary people could buy. Before that, New Year was celebrated by using guns to fire shots into the air. It was done because of an old belief that loud noises and fireworks keep spirits and negative energies away.


    • January 03, 2021
    • (CST)
    • January 03, 2022
    • (CST)
    • 2 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - VICTOR BORGE

    Børge Rosenbaum (3 January 1909 – 23 December 2000), Danish comedian, conductor, and pianist who achieved great popularity in radio and television in the United States and Europe. His blend of music and comedy earned him the nicknames The Clown Prince of Denmark, The Unmelancholy Dane, and The Great Dane.

    Victor Borge was not the first comedian to have contrived his act from sending up or mutilating serious music. But he did it with more style than anyone else, in a way which had more widespread and long-lived appeal. He continued to play his piano, or hilariously failed to play his piano, on tours of the United States, where he mainly lived, and Europe, from where he originated, well into his 80s.

    Borge always claimed that his deadpan humour succeeded because it was simple and drawn straight from life. If so, its simplicity was that of genius, of being able to impose a thread of distorted but impregnable logic on to almost any set of circumstances. 

    "What," one TV interviewer asked, "are you doing next?" "I guess I'll be going straight to the bathroom." Another interviewer asked why he had bought a farm in Portugal. "Someone," he replied, "had to buy a farm in Portugal." Even the ageing process was turned into a dismissive aside: "It is so much better than the alternative." 

    Borge the comic, whose command of the piano was (on stage) liable to grotesque accident, so that a simple piano stool could narrowly escape being a disaster area, turned even his imperilled past as a Danish Jew into the humour of mock conceit: "Only Churchill and me knew how dangerous Hitler was. Churchill was trying to save Europe, and I was trying to save myself." 

    Born in Copenhagen, Borge was the son of a violinist with the Royal Danish Philharmonic. His mother introduced him to the piano from the age of three, and he made his stage debut at the age of eight. There was one great problem which he had to face in his early career - the quality of the on-site pianos he had to play. Some were dreadful, so he developed tricks for playing them not taught by conventional teachers. Out of that situation came his humorous movements and asides, always in a distinctive, unctuous, throwaway voice. 

    By the outbreak of the second world war, Borge was a reasonably successful pianist and musical satirist in Denmark, well known for his guying of Hitler and other Nazis. When the Germans invaded Denmark, newspapers reported that his name was at the head of those destined for extermination. Fortunately for Borge, two Russian diplomats who had been amused by his act smuggled him aboard an American ship bound for Finland, from where he caught the last boat out to the free part of Europe. 

    Once in New York, however, Borge was handicapped by not knowing a word of English. He studied it in cinemas on 42nd Street, watching the same films round and round until he made some sort of sense of what the characters were saying. Being asked to read lines for the warm-up of a radio show led to him being invited to do the same sort of job on air for the Bing Crosby Kraft Music Hall. He understood hardly anything of what he was reading, but his ruptured English made him a success with listeners. He liked to recall that he was nominated second-best radio comedian of the year. 

    Out of this grew his mature act, in which language and logic tortured one another to breaking point. On the west coast, he made music and comedy records for the US war effort, and afterwards developed a repertoire of 15,000 jokes or routines, from which he could make a selection to suit any audience. 

    He devised variations on an early performance, when he had been trying to play seriously. Not trusting his memory, he stuck sheet music inside the piano lid, only to find that in performance it was peeling off around him like leaves in a storm. The counterpoint between his lugubrious dignity and the bizarre things that befell him - like being blasted off his piano stool by a soprano's top note, then producing a safety belt from the stool - could be hilarious. 

    Borge made a unique and highly lucrative niche for himself. He hired his own orchestra for his tours of the US and Canada, and had a 22-acre ranch and pool in the San Fernando Valley, California. His first marriage ended in divorce, and his second marriage, in 1953, was to his manageress, Sanna (who died in September). But when his ex-wife was occupying the ranch, he had to become frugal, setting up a large poultry farm in Connecticut so that he could have a stately home that made a profit. 

    In the 1970s, when more boisterous sorts of comedy became fashionable, he seemed to falter, complaining that the tabloids called him a has-been. During a London visit, he was touchingly grateful that broadsheet critics praised the show. He invigorated his act by introducing as partners a succession of attractive young women. 

    By the 1980s, Borge had got his second wind and looked like going on for ever as an international touring artist. By the 1990s, his initial suspicion of television - he thought his material too narrowly-based for constant TV exposure - had disappeared entirely. He continued touring, with a sell-out audience at the Barbican for his 1992 tour of the US, Australia and Britain. 

    His work for good causes, including Thanks To Scandinavia, a scholarship fund to commemorate Scandinavian efforts to help victims of Nazi persecution, earned him honours in several countries. But bringing laughter pleased him even more than honours. "The shortest distance between two people is a smile," was one of his favorite sayings, and there was always something life-affirming about his studied, quiet, intellectually devious humor. 

    • March 01, 2021
    • (CST)
    • March 01, 2023
    • (CST)
    • 3 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - CHRISTIAN GULLAGER

    Amandus Christian Gullager (March 1, 1759 – November 12, 1826) was a Danish-American artist specializing in portraits and theatrical scenery in the late 18th century. He worked in BostonMassachusetts,  New York, and Philadelphia.

    Gullager was born to Christian Guldager Prang and Marie Elisabeth Dalberg in Copenhagen. He trained at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts where he was awarded a silver medal in 1780. Gullager moved to Boston by 1786. In 1792, Gullager established a drawing academy at his house on Tremont Hill in Boston. Gullager worked in Newburyport in 1786, in Boston from 1789-1797, in New York City from 1797-1798, in Philadelphia 1798-1805, and in New York again in 1806–07. He died during 1826 in Philadelphia and was buried at the Second Presbyterian Church Yard, Third and Arch Streets.

    Gullager trained at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen and by 1789 established himself in Boston as one of the "best portrait painters of this metropolis."  Gullager worked in Newburyport in 1786, in Boston from 1789 to 1797, in New York City from the fall of 1797 to the spring of 1798, in Philadelphia from 1798 to 1805, and in New York again in 1806–07.  Approximately sixty portraits are attributed to Gullager, many of which were painted in Massachusetts. He also painted scenery for the theater in Boston and New York, designed engravings and medals, and sculpted a bust of George Washington from life. Gullager even advertised himself as a miniaturist, although no surviving miniatures are assigned to him. The last twenty years of his life are undocumented, except for his return in 1826 to Philadelphia, where he died.


    More Information

    • March 25, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • April 01, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • American-Scandinavian Foundation - New York, NY

    ASF FELLOWSHIPS & GRANTS FOR DANISH CITIZENS TO STUDY IN THE U.S. 2021-22

    APRIL 1, 2021 DEADLINE


    New York, NY—The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications from Danish graduate students and post-graduates who wish to study or conduct research in the U.S. during the 2021-22 academic year. Awards are made in all fields.

    For further information and to begin an online application, please click here!

    Deadline: April 1, 2021

    FOR DANISH CITIZENS TO STUDY IN THE U.S. 2021-22



    Download Full Press Release

    For email inquiries, please contact grants@amscan.org.
    For more information, please visit www.amscan.org.


    FELLOWSHIPS & GRANTS


    SCANDINAVIA HOUSE
    58 PARK AVENUE
    NEW YORK, NY 10016
    212-779-3587

    SCANDINAVIAHOUSE.ORG


    @ScanHouse



    • April 01, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • April 01, 2025
    • (CDT)
    • 5 sessions

    BODTKER GRANTS - DEADLINE

    Deadline for Submission: April 15

    The Danish American Heritage Society is pleased to offer grants to qualified researchers for study in area of common interest. Bodtker Grants provide stipends of up to $5,000 for students or graduates interested in exploring  topics related to Danish history and heritage in North America. 


    A Bodtker Grant is primarily intended for research and internship at Danish American Archive and Library in Blair, Nebraska; the Danish American Archive at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa; or the Museum of Danish America in Elk Horn, Iowa. At the Board's discretion, proposals involving other Danish cultural and archival institutions may be considered.

    Deadlines: April 15 (Notification: May) or September 15(Notification: October)
    Stipend Amount: Up to $5,000

    Grant Application

    DAHS Website


    • April 26, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • April 26, 2022
    • (CDT)
    • 2 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - OLAF HENRIKSEN

    Olaf Henriksen (April 26, 1888 – October 17, 1962) was a Major League Baseball outfielder who remains to date the only Danish-born person ever to play in the major leagues. He played seven seasons (1911–17) for the Boston Red Sox as a teammate of Hall of Famers Babe Ruth and Tris Speaker, among others, and he played a role in three World Series victories, namely in 1912, 1915 and 1916.

    Defensively Olaf Henriksen solely played the outfield. His primary offensive skill was to get on base, and he recorded the second highest on-base percentage in modern baseball history among rookies with more than 100 plate appearances. He never showed much power, though, as he only had one career home run. Henriksen was mainly a bench player for the Red Sox, but he delivered a decisive hit against the famous pitcher Christy Mathewson in Boston's World Series victory in 1912.

    Despite being born in Denmark, Henriksen's nickname was "Swede".  In his active baseball career he was 5 ft. 7½ in. tall and weighed 158 lb.

    Olaf Henriksen was born in the Danish village Kirkerup on Western Zealand in 1888. Not much is known about the reason for his immigration to the United States. His baseball talents were first discovered by the Boston Americans while he played for their minor league affiliate Brockton in the New England League, and he debuted in the Major Leagues on August 11, 1911 at the age of 23. Boston lost the game 11-5 to the Philadelphia Athletics.

    At the beginning of the 1912 season rumour had it that Olaf Henriksen and his teammate Hugh Bradley were to be traded to the New York Highlanders in exchange for star player Hal Chase. The New York Times described it as "one of the most important trades of recent years", but the deal was never finalized.  The public began to take notice of Henriksen, as evidenced by this preseason analysis of Boston's roster:

    The outfield will remain about the same for SpeakerLewis and Hooper are a trio that is hard to beat. Olaf Henricksen, [sic] however, is going to give Lewis a fight for his job. Henricksen, until he was injured, was going at a great clip, and all pitchers looked alike to him.

    — Harry Casey, Baseball Magazine, January 1912

    His last game was against the Washington Senators on June 27, 1917. Three days later Olaf Henriksen was released from the team and sent back to the minor leagues, but he refused to report.  A year later the New York Times reported that the Brooklyn Robins was attempting to sign Henriksen with the intention of letting him reassume his familiar role as a pinch hitter, but the negotiations apparently stalled.   After his own professional career ended, Olaf Henriksen became the manager of the baseball team at Boston College.  He also managed the semipro team of the Grow Tire Company of Boston.

    Henriksen's family included his wife Mary and daughter Catherine.  On October 17, 1962 Olaf Henriksen died in Norwood, Massachusetts. He is buried in St. Mary Cemetery in the town of Canton, Massachusetts.

    Red Sox team photo taken after their World Series victory in 1916. Olaf Henriksen is the third man from the right in the back row.

    Henriksen batted and threw left-handed.  A baseball card from 1912, which was produced by a cigar company, calls him the "viking descended outfielder".  He is described as a "slashing" hitter who quickly gathered interest from scouts of the Boston Americans. In the Major Leagues he was typically used as a pinch hitter, and as a consequence he only had an average of 1.9 plate appearances per game played over the course of his career. He never became a regular in the lineup but instead he served as a backup for Red Sox' famous outfield trio consisting of Tris SpeakerHarry Hooper and Duffy Lewis. In 1915 he appeared in 73 regular season games and 2 additional games in the playoffs which was his personal record.

    Defensively Henriksen exclusively played the outfield. He had most appearances (61) as right fielder, second most (42) as left fielder and finally some (22) as center fielder.

    Probably the greatest moment in Olaf Henriksen's professional baseball career occurred when Red Sox manager Jake Stahl decided to use Henriksen as a pinch hitter for Hugh Bedient in the 7th inning of the eighth and final game of the 1912 World Series. Boston was behind by a run and the opposing pitcher was Christy Mathewson, later to become one of the first five players elected into the Hall of Fame. With a late swing Henriksen hit a curveball from Mathewson directly against 3rd base. The ball ricocheted off the base and went far enough into foul territory for the runner on 2nd to score. Henriksen, whom the New York World described as "the confounded son of Thor", ended up with a double. The Red Sox went on to win the game and thereby the World Series.

    On March 17, 1916 the Red Sox played an internal spring training match. Babe Ruth launched a long shot which looked like a sure home run, but Olaf Henriksen managed to surprise everybody by literally running through the wooden outfield fence and catching the ball.

    Olaf Henriksen is furthermore one of the few players to ever have pinch hit for Babe Ruth. On June 7, 1916, when Ruth had pitched 7 innings versus the Cleveland Indians, Henriksen was substituted into the game and got a base on balls, which ultimately tied the score at 1–1. The Red Sox won the game 2–1.

    Henriksen's aggregate batting averageon-base percentage and slugging percentage for his career was .269/.392/.329, respectively. His best season was probably 1913, in which he batted .375/.468/.400 in 31 games, although he played a more significant role on the team the following year when he in 63 games batted .263/.407/.337.

    Among rookies with a minimum of 100 plate appearances in their first season in Major League Baseball, Olaf Henriksen registered the second highest on-base percentage since the year 1900 when he in 1911 posted a mark of .449.

    Judging from his (even for that era) low slugging percentage, Henriksen was a pretty light-hitting player, and he did only hit 1 career home run, with only 20 of his 131 career hits going for extra bases. In addition, he scored 84 runs and got 48 runs batted in in his career.

    Henriksen seems to have had tremendous plate discipline, as evidenced by his 97 career walks versus only 43 recorded strikeouts. However, strikeout data for hitters only dates back to 1913, so in the years with complete statistics his walk/strikeout ratio was 69/43 = 1.6, which is far above the Major League average of that period (approximately 0.8).

    He recorded 15 stolen bases versus 9 caught stealing over the course of his career, although the last figure is doubtful due to insufficient data from that age in that particular statistical category.

    Of a total of 176 total chances he committed 6 errors and had 8 outfield assists. His career fielding percentage was .966 which is a little higher than the league-average fielding percentage of the time (0.956).

    Olaf Henriksen played in five World Series games, with a minimum of one appearance in each of the three Series which Boston participated in (and won) during his tenure on the team. In these games he totalled four plate appearances, of which one resulted in a hit, one in a base on balls and the last two in outs.

    • May 03, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • May 03, 2023
    • (CDT)
    • 3 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - JACOB RIIS

    Jacob August Riis (May 3, 1849 – May 26, 1914) was a Danish-American social reformer, "muckraking" journalist and social documentary photographer. He is known for using his photographic and journalistic talents to help the impoverished in New York City; those impoverished New Yorkers were the subject of most of his prolific writings and photography. He endorsed the implementation of "model tenements" in New York with the help of humanitarian Lawrence Veiller. Additionally, as one of the most famous proponents of the newly practicable casual photography, he is considered one of the fathers of photography due to his very early adoption of flash in photography.   Text under CC-BY-SA license 

    In 1870, when Jacob August Riis immigrated to America from Ribe, Denmark on the steamship Iowa, he rode in steerage with nothing but the clothes on his back, 40 borrowed dollars in his pocket, and a locket containing a single hair from the girl he loved. It must have been hard for the 21-year-old Riis to imagine that in just a few short years, he would be pallin’ around with a future president, become a pioneer in photojournalism, and help reform housing policy in New York City.

    Jacob Riis, who died in 1914, struggled through his first few years in the United States. Unable to find a steady job, he worked as a farmhand, ironworker, brick-layer, carpenter, and salesman, and experienced the worst aspects of American urbanism--crime, sickness, squalor--in the low-rent tenements and lodging houses that would eventually inspire the young Danish immigrant to dedicate himself to improving living conditions for the city’s lower-class.

    Through a little bit of luck and a lot of hard work, he got a job as a journalist and a platform for exposing the plight of the lower class community. Eventually, Riis became a police reporter for The New York Tribune, covering some of the city's most crime-ridden districts, a job that would would lead to fame and a friendship with police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt, who called Riis "the best American I ever knew." Riis knew what it was to suffer, to starve, and to be homeless, and, though his prose was sometimes sensationalist and even occasionally prejudiced, he had what Roosevelt called "the great gift of making others see what he saw and feel what he felt."

    But Riis wanted to literally show the the world what he saw. So, to help his readers truly understand the dehumanizing dangers of the immigrant neighborhoods he knew all too well, Riis taught himself photography and began taking a camera with him on his nightly rounds. The recent invention of flash photography made it possible to document the dark, over-crowded tenements, grim saloons and dangerous slums. Riis’s pioneering use of flash photography brought to light even the darkest parts of the city. Used in articles, books, and lectures, his striking compositions became powerful tools for social reform.

    Riis’s 1890 treatise of social criticism How the Other Half Lives was written in the belief “that every man’s experience ought to be worth something to the community from which he drew it, no matter what that experience may be, so long as it was gleaned along the line of some decent, honest work.” Full of unapologetically harsh accounts of life in the worst slums of New York, fascinating and terrible statistics on tenement living, and reproductions of his revelatory photographs, How the Other Half Lives
    was a shock to many New Yorkers - and an immediate success. Not only did it sell well, but it inspired Roosevelt to close the worst of the lodging houses and spurred city officials to reform and enforce the city’s housing policies. To once again quote the future President of the United States: “The countless evils which lurk in the dark corners of our civic institutions, which stalk abroad in the slums, and have their permanent abode in the crowded tenement houses, have met in Mr. Riis the most formidable opponent every encountered by them in New York City.”  (Jimmy Stamp - Smithsonian Magazine)


    • May 08, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • May 08, 2023
    • (CDT)
    • 3 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - TED SORENSEN

    Theodore Chaikin Sorensen (May 8, 1928 – October 31, 2010) was an American lawyer, writer, and presidential adviser. He was a speechwriter for President John F. Kennedy, as well as one of his closest advisers. President Kennedy once called him his "intellectual blood bank".

    Sorensen was born in Lincoln, Nebraska, the son of Christian A. Sorensen (1890–1959), who served as Nebraska attorney general (1929–33), and Annis (Chaikin) Sorensen. His father was Danish American and his mother was of Russian Jewish descent. His younger brother, Philip C. Sorensen, later became the lieutenant governor of Nebraska. He graduated from Lincoln High School during 1945. He earned a bachelor's degree at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, and attended University of Nebraska College of Law, graduating first in his class.

    During January 1953, the 24-year-old Sorensen became the new Senator John F. Kennedy's chief legislative aide. He wrote many of Kennedy's articles and speeches. In his 2008 autobiography Counselor: A Life at the Edge of History, Sorensen said he wrote "a first draft of most of the chapters" of John F. Kennedy's 1956 book Profiles in Courage and "helped choose the words of many of its sentences."

    White House photo of Sorensen during the Kennedy administration.

    Sorensen was President Kennedy's special counsel, adviser, and primary speechwriter, the role for which he is remembered best. He helped draft the inaugural address in which Kennedy said famously, "Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country." Although Sorensen played an important part in the composition of the inaugural address, "the speech and its famous turn of phrase that everyone remembers was," Sorensen has stated (counter to what the majority of authors, journalists, and other media sources have claimed), "written by Kennedy himself." In his 2008 memoir, Counselor: A Life at the Edge of History, Sorensen claimed, "The truth is that I simply don't remember where the line came from."

    During the early months of the administration, Sorensen's responsibilities concerned the domestic agenda. After the Bay of Pigs debacle, Kennedy asked Sorensen to participate with foreign policy discussions as well. During the Cuban Missile Crisis, Sorensen served as a member of ExComm and was named by Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara as one of the "true inner circle" members who advised the president, the others being Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, National Security Adviser McGeorge Bundy, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, General Maxwell D. Taylor(chairman of the Joint Chiefs), former ambassador to the USSR Llewellyn Thompson, and McNamara himself. Sorensen played a critical role in drafting Kennedy's correspondence with Nikita Khrushchev and worked on Kennedy's first address to the nation about the crisis on October 22.

    Sorensen was devastated by Kennedy's assassination, which he termed "the most deeply traumatic experience of my life. ... I had never considered a future without him."  He later quoted a poem that he said summed up how he felt: "How could you leave us, how could you die? We are sheep without a shepherd when the snow shuts out the sky." He submitted a letter of resignation to President Johnson the day after the assassination but was persuaded to stay through the transition. Sorensen drafted Johnson's first address to Congress as well as the 1964 State of the Union. He officially resigned February 29, 1964, and was the first member of the Kennedy Administration to do so. As Johnson was later to recount in his memoirs, Sorensen helped in the transition to the new administration with those speeches.

    Prior to his resignation, Sorensen stated his intent to write Kennedy's biography, calling it "the book that President Kennedy had intended to write with my help after his second term." He was not the only Kennedy aide to publish writings; historian and special assistant Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. wrote his Pulitzer Prize winning memoir A Thousand Days: John F. Kennedy in the White House during the same period. Sorensen's biography, Kennedy, was published during 1965 and became an international bestseller. - Wikipedia


    • May 09, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • May 09, 2022
    • (CDT)
    • 2 sessions

    THIS DATE IN DANISH AMERICAN HISTORY - JENS MUNK

    On May 9, 1619, Jens Munk with two ships and 65 men set sail from Copenhagen for North America in search of the Northwest Passage to the Orient.  Munk, commissioned by King Christian IV, made his way past the Southern tip of Greenland through Hudson Straight and into Hudson Bay.  There he took possession of the country in the name of King Christian and called the region Novia Dania, but after extensive search failed to find the passage.  Instead the expedition was confronted with a bleak winter, so Munk sailed south to what is now the Churchill River and prepared for the season.  They built huts, cut wood, and killed wild fowl to compensate for their lack of equipment and provisions.  They survived the autumn months well and the chaplain, Rasmus Jensen, led the celebration of Christmas in the traditional Lutheran way.  But in January the winter became severe and exposure to the elements, shortage of food, and scurvy led to ill health and death.  One man after another died, including chaplain Jensen, until only Jens Munk and two men remained alive.  Finally the temperatures warmed and by June they regained their strength, and sailing the smaller of the two ships, returned to Denmark arriving on Christmas Day.  (From "The Danish Americans" by George R. Nielsen)

    More Information

    More - Arctic Profiles

    • June 14, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • June 14, 2023
    • (CDT)
    • 3 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - STENY HOYER

    Steny Hamilton Hoyer (born June 14, 1939) is an American attorney and politician serving as U.S. Representative for Maryland's 5th congressional district since 1981 and as House Majority Leader since 2019. A Democrat, he was first elected in a special election on May 19, 1981, and is currently serving in his 20th term. The district includes a large swath of rural and suburban territory southeast of Washington, D.C. Hoyer is the dean of the Maryland Congressional delegation and the most senior Democrat in the House.

    Since 2003, Hoyer has been the second ranking Democrat in the House of Representatives behind Nancy Pelosi. He is a two-time House Majority Leader, having previously served in the post from 2007 to 2011 under Speaker Pelosi. During two periods of Republican House control (2003–2007 and 2011–2019), Hoyer served as House Minority Whip, both times under Minority Leader Pelosi. As a result of the 2018 midterm elections, in which the Democrats took control of the House, Hoyer was re-elected Majority Leader in January 2019 on the opening of the 116th Congress, remaining the number two House Democrat behind Speaker Pelosi.

    Hoyer was born in New York City, New York, and grew up in Mitchellville, Maryland, the son of Jean (née Baldwin) and Steen Theilgaard Høyer. His father was Danish and a native of Copenhagen; "Steny" is a variant of his father's name, "Steen". His mother was an American, with Scottish, German, and English ancestry, and a descendant of John Hart, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. He graduated from Suitland High School in Suitland, Maryland.

    In his early years at the University of Maryland College Park, Congressman Hoyer held a 1.9 grade point average. His attitude towards school and politics changed after hearing a speech from John F. Kennedy prior to his election in 1960. In 1963, he received his B.A. degree magna cum laude from the University of Maryland, College Park, where he also became a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity. He earned his J.D. degree from Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C., in 1966.

    Hoyer has three daughters, Anne, Susan, and Stefany, from his marriage to Judy Pickett Hoyer, who died of cancer in February 1997. In 2012, after Hoyer announced his support of same-sex marriage, his daughter Stefany Hoyer Hemmer came out as a lesbian in an interview with the Washington Blade.

    His wife was an advocate of early childhood education, and child development learning centers in Maryland have been named in her honor ("Judy Centers").  She also suffered from epilepsy, and the Epilepsy Foundation of America sponsors an annual public lecture in her name.  Hoyer, too, has been an advocate for research in this area, and the Epilepsy Foundation presented him in 2002 with their Congressional Leadership Award.

    Hoyer serves on the Board of Trustees for St. Mary's College of Maryland and is a member of the board of the International Foundation for Electoral Systems, a nonprofit that supports international elections. He is also an Advisory Board Member for the Center for the Study of Democracy.

    • July 03, 2021
    • 12:00 PM (CDT)
    • July 05, 2021
    • 1:00 PM (CDT)
    • Rebild National Park near Aalborg, Denmark

    REBILD FESTIVAL IN DENMARK

    Celebration of Danish American Friendship - The annual Rebild Festival at the Rebild National Park near Aalborg, Denmark

    Official Detailed 2021 Schedule to be Announced

    July 3 - Rebild Park events and Gala in Aalborg

    July 4 - Tent Luncheon and Festival in the Rebild Hills

    July 5 - General Membership Meeting

    http://www.danishrebildsociety.com

    https://www.rebildfesten.dk


    • July 23, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • July 23, 2023
    • (CDT)
    • 3 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - RASMUS ANDERSEN

    Rasmus Andersen (July 23, 1847 - August 21, 1930) was a Danish American Lutheran minister and is considered the founder of the Danish Seamen's Church in Brooklyn, New York.

    Reverend Andersen was born in Vedelshave, Fyn County, Denmark. While a student in 1871, he was sent to America by the "Commission for the Furtherance of the Proclamation of the Gospel Among Danes in America," established in 1869 to develop mission work among Danes that immigrated to the United States. The young Andersen wished to be a foreign missionary but the commission decided he should teach Danish immigrant children. Andersen, along with two pastors sent by the commission, arrived in New York on June 12, 1871.

    Andersen experienced some difficulty in finding a placement with a congregation. A fellow commission representative told him not to be discouraged and gave him the advice to work hard to learn English. He enrolled at the Norwegian-Danish Conference seminary in Marshall, Wisconsin, and while on a Christmas vacation visit to Waupaca, Wisconsin, found a Danish congregation to whom he could minister. He was ordained June 26, 1872, and began his work as a pastor. He stayed in the Waupaca area ministering to several congregations for six years. His next congregation, at which he remained for three years, was in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. He was the pastor at his last congregation, Our Saviour's Danish Church, in Brooklyn, New York, until his retirement in 1903.

    In addition to his pastoral work, Pastor Andersen also was a founder of the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. At the 1878 convention of the church, it created a constitution and settled matters related to home mission work, the founding of a folk school, and the publishing of a children's paper.

    Pastor Andersen also took the work of ministering to sailors and newly-arrived immigrants. He continued this work well after his retirement from the Brooklyn congregation in 1903. He was also the author of many books and pamphlets on such varied topics as the history of early Scandinavian voyages to America, advice to immigrants, travel memoirs, and biographies of pastors. He was also considered to be one of the church's first historians.

    More on the Danish Seamen's Church Website - 

    Seamen's Church History

    • August 12, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • August 12, 2022
    • (CDT)
    • 2 sessions

    A GREAT DANISH AMERICAN BIRTHDAY - ERIK CLEMMENSEN

    Erik Christian Clemmensen (August 12, 1876 – May 21, 1941) was a Danish-American  chemist. He is most commonly associated with the Clemmensen reduction, a method for converting a carbonyl group into a methylene group.

    Clemmensen was born on August 12, 1876 in Odense, Denmark.

    He left school at the age of 15. He signed up to join an expedition on a warship, with the aim of becoming a naval officer, but illness prevented him from achieving this goal. Clemmensen studied at the Copenhagen Polytechnic Institute (now the Technical University of Denmark). He emigrated to the United States in 1900 and worked in the pharmaceutical industry. He joined the pharmaceutical company Parke, Davis & Co in DetroitMichigan. For the invention of the Clemmensen reduction, he received his Ph.D. in 1913 from the University of Copenhagen.

    In 1914, he co-founded the Commonwealth Chemical Corporation in Newark, New York along with H.G. Chapman and Rhea Chittenden, where he developed methods for the manufacture of sodium benzoatevanillin, and coumarin. After a fire in 1929, the company was acquired by Monsanto Chemical Company and moved to St. Louis, Missouri. While working for Monsanto, Clemmensen helped develop the synthesis of the artificial sweetener saccharin. In 1935, he returned to New York City and founded The Clemmensen Chemical Corp.

    He is best known for the reaction that he developed while at Parke, Davis & Co. This reaction involves the reduction of ketones using a zinc amalgam and HCl. It has been employed in the preparation of polycyclic aromatics and aromatics containing linear hydrocarbon side chains, the latter not being obtainable from a Friedel-Crafts alkylation.

    Clemmensen died on May 21, 1941 in Newark, New York.

    • September 01, 2021
    • (CDT)
    • September 01, 2025
    • (CDT)
    • 5 sessions

    BODTKER GRANTS - DEADLINE

    Deadline for Submission: September 15

    The Danish American Heritage Society is pleased to offer grants to qualified researchers for study in area of common interest. Bodtker Grants provide stipends of up to $5,000 for students or graduates interested in exploring  topics related to Danish history and heritage in North America. 


    A Bodtker Grant is primarily intended for research and internship at Danish American Archive and Library in Blair, Nebraska; the Danish American Archive at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa; or the Museum of Danish America in Elk Horn, Iowa. At the Board's discretion, proposals involving other Danish cultural and archival institutions may be considered.

    Deadlines: April 15 (Notification: May) or September 15(Notification: October)
    Stipend Amount: Up to $5,000

    Grant Application

    DAHS Website



National Foundation for Danish America
PO Box 1003
Wilmette, Illinois 60091

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